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I am looking for some insight with my male poodle. He is a white mini poodle who is 6 years old. I have had him since he was 4 months old and recently (within the last year) he has become very food aggressive towards other dogs and territorial in the bed. It seems to only happen with other male dogs. I recently introduced him to my boyfriends very submissive hound dog and they get along until it comes to food or bed time. My dog attacked the hound today (who is 4x his size) after they were DONE eating.

My dog has lived with 3 other male dogs for the past 4 years and doesn't have an issue with them when it comes to his food.

Does anyone have any recommendations on what I can do to stop this behavior?
 

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For a start, absolutely no dogs on the bed! Feed in separate spaces. Watch the behavior of your own and BF's dog for body language that signals stress or unhappiness with the situation.

Separately was this at your home or BF's home? Was there territorial stuff going on? How did you introduce them in one or other home or on neutral ground (I hope)? Did you allow for a retreat if one of them was unhappy or did you make them remain close?

Not all dogs will like and want to be social with all dogs. All dogs need social skills towards people and other dogs, but that doesn't mean all dogs can live with all other dogs. Some combinations just don't work but there shouldn't be real aggression. We don't leave our male dogs unattended together because we know they don't really like each other, but we also know neither of them wants to kill the other one either. We chose to make that work for us all, but it isn't for everyone.
 

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I am looking for some insight with my male poodle. He is a white mini poodle who is 6 years old. I have had him since he was 4 months old and recently (within the last year) he has become very food aggressive towards other dogs and territorial in the bed. It seems to only happen with other male dogs. I recently introduced him to my boyfriends very submissive hound dog and they get along until it comes to food or bed time. My dog attacked the hound today (who is 4x his size) after they were DONE eating.

My dog has lived with 3 other male dogs for the past 4 years and doesn't have an issue with them when it comes to his food.

Does anyone have any recommendations on what I can do to stop this behavior?
Your dog is trying to tell you he feels uncomfortable. Sometimes it looks like the dog who is reacting is the dog who has a problem, but that's not always the case. It could be the hound dog gave off a gesture in dog language that wasn't friendly, or, conversely, in a clumsy attempt to be friendly, the hound accidentally scared your dog.

You said he gets upset when he is done eating. What happens before he gets upset? Does the hound step toward his bowl? Look at his bowl? Stare at your dog? Invade your dog's space? Dogs speak in body language and sometimes we don't see the full picture. We pay close attention to the noisy reaction and miss the trigger. It could be your dog is reacting for a darn good reason.

You know the feeling you have when the waiter tries to take your plate before you're done eating? That's food aggression. The trigger was the waiter. What's trigger for your dog? Pay attention to what comes before the reaction, and you'll learn a lot about your dog.

What you can do to stop this behavior is create an environment where it cannot occur. Your dog doesn't like eating around the hound dog. Feed them in separate rooms. Give treats in separate rooms, too. Where does your dog sleep? A dog's sleeping space is sacred, just like it is for you. I doubt you'd feel comfortable having someone you don't know very well share a bed with you tonight. It's the same with your dog. Your dog needs a space to sleep that is free from invaders and usurpers.

Separate the dogs during meals and snacks. Keep sleeping quarters sacred. And if you see a problem, write down what happened just prior to your dog getting upset. Learning what sets off the reaction will help you avoid the dominos falling.
 

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Catherine,

I love when I don't read your posts before replying, and then read it and we're in sync again. Like you, I tend to go mitigation first, then see if I can untangle the reason for the behavior. Fastest way to stop an unwanted behavior is changing the environment in a way that makes it less likely to occur.
 

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I agree with keeping dogs off the bed. They are perfectly fine on the floor and won't feel unloved.

I also agree with feeding them separately. Since I feed raw, my dog(s) eat outside. They each will grab their meat and high tail it to different areas. This is natural.
 
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