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For quite a while now, my wife and I have been pondering adding another dog to our family. We currently have a small terrier mix that we adopted about 3 years ago. Because of his small size, we wanted a breed that is relatively friendly to other dogs, and that would make a great family companion. We also wanted a dog that is intelligent, easy to train, moderately active, and that sheds little or not at all. All of these characteristics brought us to the poodle! I'm a tall guy, and I wanted a larger dog this time around so that I don't have to bend in half to give the dog a treat. So, we are going with a standard.

I've been in contact with a reputable breeder, and they are expecting a litter at the end of the week. If all goes well, I'll be placing a deposit for a puppy after that. In the meantime, I came here to learn as much as I can about the breed and about caring for a dog in general. We've only adopted dogs as young adults before, so this will be our first puppy. We have a lot to learn, I am anxious but also excited for the new addition to the family.
 

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Welcome to PF. I am sure you will enjoy having a standard poodle. I am not super tall but since I don't like having to do deep knee bends to take a dumbbell or give a treat standards are the dog for me too. they are everything you described them as although they are not always easy to train because they are such major brainiacs and can outsmart you if you aren't careful!


If you don't mind sharing, where is your pup coming from? Feel free not to answer since things are not set in stone just yet.
 
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Welcome - sounds like a poodle is perfect for you. My boy is a standard as I too wanted his size. Asta is 50 lbs which I can manage in an emergency. He helps me so much - is smart as a whip and training me as much as I am training him.
 

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Hi and welcome. Hope everything goes well so you’ll be bringing home a poodle bundle of joy home soon.
 
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I had a standard poodle many years ago. Eight kids bouncing around the house and yard never phased the dog.

I'm sure you have been warned about grooming. Magnum was a sleek active 60 pounds. That is a lot of wool. Learn how to comb out/brush out the dog and do it often because debri will stick in the hair. More combing equals fewer baths.

Your little puppy will become a big dog, so never allow him to jump on people. He runs up to you, you hold out a treat, let him sniff it and lure him into a sit. Have him always sit when he is front and center and that will keep him from jumping on people.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I had a standard poodle many years ago. Eight kids bouncing around the house and yard never phased the dog.

I'm sure you have been warned about grooming. Magnum was a sleek active 60 pounds. That is a lot of wool. Learn how to comb out/brush out the dog and do it often because debri will stick in the hair. More combing equals fewer baths.

Your little puppy will become a big dog, so never allow him to jump on people. He runs up to you, you hold out a treat, let him sniff it and lure him into a sit. Have him always sit when he is front and center and that will keep him from jumping on people.
Sounds like good advice, thanks!
 

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Welcome Eric! I always had Scottie’s and then made a breed change to heal a broken heart and finally to have a big dog. Be prepared for a VERY smart dog that is also irresistible:)
 

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Exciting! I have a 15 week old Spoo :) How old will your puppy be when you get him/her??
If you’ve never had a puppy before:

- Their noses are to the ground CONSTANTLY inside and outside so you need to make sure you have absolutely nothing that he/she can eat because if they see it, they WILL eat it (and not tell you). It happens literally in the blink of an eye.
- Make sure you have a really high quality diet. I recommend 100% staying away from kibble & try making a homemade food or buying Raw. Seriously, this makes such a massive difference to the growth and health later on down the road for your new puppy. Your puppy will be eating quite a bit, and he/she will go through a phase where really you should let him/her eat as much as they will until they leave some in their bowl. Puppies will have a period of time where they peak in their appetite when they’re doing a lot of growing, then they’ll come back down again. Poodles are not glutens & they’ll typically only eat until they’re full.
- Don’t take your puppy anywhere until 21 days after his/her vaccines! You do not want to risk Parvo or Distemper.
- Always supervise toy chewing and inspect your puppy’s toys often. Some Standard Poodles are light chewers, some are rippers, some are medium chewers. But all puppies that will start teething around approx 15 weeks will be mouthy (my little boy right now sleeps a bunch, then wakes up and runs around with his mouth open!), and chewing on everythinggggg - but they can’t help that. Gentle reinforcement when they gnaw on something they shouldn’t could include redirecting his/her attention to a toy instead.
“Kong” makes excellent teething toys for puppies. I recommend getting the large puppy size.
- Standard Poodles have “soft” mouths. Stay away from rawhide (they’re not good for any dog) but “Nylabone” makes some soft-er bones for chewing especially while they’re a puppy.
- Don’t let him/her have free run of your house for quite a long time. You should have a nice big area inside gated off for your pup to play in with his/her toys, a crate if you’re going to crate train (good idea to do for a puppy!!! But never ever use it for punishment) water and food bowls of course
- Puppies are like newborn babies. You’ll be tired (I know I am!) a little stressed maybe, they’ll be needy, clingy, they’ll need reassurance from you for a while since they’ll be adjusting from leaving their litter-mates. He/she may not want you to leave them alone for a while, they may whine or bark - it’s normal. It’s normal to want to cuddle them to give them comfort, especially for the first few weeks home.
- After your puppy’s vaccines (21 days after) start taking him/her to new places slowly. You want to make sure they become used to new sounds and experiences when they’re young so they’re not afraid when they’re older. Controlled exposure is good. Stay away from dog parks until he/she is much older.
- Try clicker training. Really helps, especially for teaching tricks.
- Buy him/her soft treats. I’d recommend freeze dried chicken, beef liver, turkey. One ingredient, nutritious and they love them.

Beyond these things, I’d say just research as much as you can!! A big bit of advice is also to be suuuuper patient.. Both with your puppy, and yourself. Your puppy won’t know how to listen to you as quickly as you may want, and your puppy will definitely act like a goofball and sometimes test the limits - being firm in your “no’s”, without being intimidating & making your puppy fearful of you, is so important.

Standard Poodles are very loving, comforting, smart (my boy learned “shake a paw in 3 days after lots of repetition and little pieces of treats, no joke!), sensitive dogs that will grow up to be extremely confident and well adjusted if you give them guidance, teach them boundaries and lots of love when they’re puppies. They’re like kids - you have to train them when they’re young, to be well-behaved, good citizens in the future.
I know this is a loooong post, but I hope it helps a bit :) Reach out if you need help.. Good luck!!


 

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Thanks so much for the advice, I appreciate it! The puppy will be around 8-9 weeks old when we bring it home. The litter is due any time now, so we still have time to prepare. I haven't talked to my vet yet about the vaccinations, but according to the AKC schedule, distemper is at 6-8 weeks, and parvo at 10-12 weeks. Assuming I wait 21 days after, we're looking at 13-15 weeks before I can take the puppy out of the house? By then the most critical socialization period is over. I want to be safe, but that seems like an awful lot of missed socialization opportunities. How do you manage it?
 

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Thanks so much for the advice, I appreciate it! The puppy will be around 8-9 weeks old when we bring it home. The litter is due any time now, so we still have time to prepare. I haven't talked to my vet yet about the vaccinations, but according to the AKC schedule, distemper is at 6-8 weeks, and parvo at 10-12 weeks. Assuming I wait 21 days after, we're looking at 13-15 weeks before I can take the puppy out of the house? By then the most critical socialization period is over. I want to be safe, but that seems like an awful lot of missed socialization opportunities. How do you manage it?

There’s more and more research about waiting to vaccinate until 12 weeks old.. My breeder actually stipulated in the contract that they do not want vaccines administered at all until 12-15 weeks old (I did it at 12 weeks old as that’s when I brought my puppy home so he was better socialized with his litter etc) and rabies at 25 weeks old. Basically, a puppy has their mother’s immunity and antibodies so vaccinating too young actually is redundant and puts their little bodies through a lot, that really isn’t necessary. There’s of course many different opinions on this (as with everything), but I do have articles my breeder printed out for me from a research Dr., that supports waiting. If you want to just research this a bit more, I have some articles from my breeder that I can pass along or you can do some searches on your own. While every puppy is different of course, my breeders follow the “no vaccines until 12-15 weeks old” for all their puppies and did so with their adult dogs too. They focus on nutrition and building the puppies immune system at a young age.
They feed raw, add a pre&probiotic, use hemp oil in the food, treats are freeze dried or home cooked, as well as offering a bit of goats milk as a treat too. They start this immediately after the pups are weaned. Really if your puppy got adequate colostrum at birth, and the breeder is reputable and properly vaccinated the puppy’s mother, there should be little concern. Some people say the puppies immunity from their mother can leave them at 3 weeks - but if that really is the case (which may be in some cases, I’m not saying it’s not possible) - then I would think my breeder would have had some very sick puppies at some point and not be in “Good Standing” and registered with the CKC (Canadian Kennel Club).

The immunity to the vaccine isn’t instant. My vet told me it takes 21 days for your pup to build the full protection, and so to be very careful where I took him. Of course you can take him out of the house, but really try and limit high risk areas such as dog parks, wooded areas for hiking, direct contact with “stranger” dogs etc where risk is just higher. Socializing with your dog at home and bonding, as well as with family members etc is really crucial especially at that age. Things like parvo and distemper can be transmitted much easier than rabies. Distemper, you can actually bring in on your shoes.

But, Eric, if you are at all uneasy about this - I get it. It’s not “wrong” to do it either way. :)


 

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And to your point about the most crucial socialization opportunities being over by 13-15 weeks of age - definitely not imho! :)


 

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Well, I'm one who does believe in early socialization being critical. I really wanted to get my dogs out and about before the window closes at 16 weeks.

I took my dogs out in a stroller EVERYWHERE I could (garden centers, coffee shops, Nordstrom, Home Goods, schools, walks in the park) before they were fully vaccinated. I let as many people say hi to them and pet them. Then puppy socials at training class plus walks in my neighborhood 2 weeks past the second vaccination. Places like the dog park and the general public were off limits until three weeks past their final vaccination.
 

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Welcome to the forum! It is so exciting getting a new puppy! I don’t have a standard but a mini.

Everybody is absolutely correct about being smart... and yes, he/she will outsmart you, or try to, at every turn. My mpoo, about a a short while after I wee pad trained him showed me just what to expect. I had the wee pad in my living room, and had taken it out of the playpen as he learned how to walk to it himself.

Every time he’d go potty, I’d give I him a treat. One day I was on the phone with a friend and not paying such close attention to him. I heard a tiny yip and saw him on the pad. He then ran to me and got his treat. A short while later he again was on the pad, and when I saw him he ran to me and got his treat. The third time he yippedand was on the pad, I finally looked at the pad, and he hadn’t used it once! That was the first time he outsmarted me and my guard went up.

Also, from the two poodles I’ve had, I find them too be really drawn to good praise when they do something right. Other than the wee pad, I trained him with just praise. People have said it is quicker with treat, but in my experience that doesn’t hold true. When Zekefur is learning something new, I don’t give him a gentle “Good boy” and a scratch on the head. I give him a very excited “GOOD BOY!”, lots of quick, excited rubs on his body and head, pick him up and give him a kiss, and more. I keep it super upbeat, and he responds to that wonderfully and is excited to do the trick or new
Thing I am teaching him.

Make sure electrical wires are hidden. Zeke was prone to put his mouth on cables and electrical wires. I got a scented dish soap and wiped everything down with it. The next time he put his mouth on it the taste was disgusting and he quickly learned to leave them alone.

Poodles are also very affectionate and cuddly. They are also very sensitive. Don’t be harsh in discipline. Don’t scream and yell a “no!” Just firmly say “no!” Or off! Or whatever words you choose to do. I taught mine the word “stop”, which means no matter what he’s doing he stops dead in his tracks and looks to me. It’s a great command. I’ve seldom used it, but it can be life saving. A lot of people will call this “Leave it”.


And I’ll echo it’s very important to crate train. I didn’t do it with Zekefur, and he now has an injury for which I need to keep him quiet, and it’s nearly impossible. I wish I had.

I wish you the best with your new puppy! It’s a tiring, but very exciting and fun time. Hope you’ll share plenty of pics once you get him or her. We all love our puppy fixes!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Well, I'm one who does believe in early socialization being critical. I really wanted to get my dogs out and about before the window closes at 16 weeks.



I took my dogs out in a stroller EVERYWHERE I could (garden centers, coffee shops, Nordstrom, Home Goods, schools, walks in the park) before they were fully vaccinated. I let as many people say hi to them and pet them. Then puppy socials at training class plus walks in my neighborhood 2 weeks past the second vaccination. Places like the dog park and the general public were off limits until three weeks past their final vaccination.


For sure it’s important! Since he has never had a puppy before, I want him to understand that if he doesn’t immediately socialize with stranger dogs and foreign places etc in the first 8-15 weeks of the puppy’s life, he is not somehow damaging the puppy’s ability to be a well socialized dog.
I only got my puppy at 12 weeks old and I only vaccinated him at 12 weeks old - so I waited to take him on public grasses and high traffic public areas - until he was 15 weeks old (which he is now almost 16 weeks old) but in the meantime he met many family and friends, socialized with my cat, sat on my porch with me and watched neighbour dogs go by, met some neighbours who came to greet him (on his home turf), was in our fenced-in backyard and also came for car rides and experienced new smells - all in a controlled way for 21 days.... My boy has now been coming right into public with me and to pet stores and he’s great. In the time before he could go right into public I have done a lot of training and bonding and socializing - just close to home. As you said, dog park and public places off limits.


 

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I have to agree with MF, though I did some I did not do nearly enough with my boy. So I do have some issues that are being worked out but its taken me longer to do. If ever I had a do over I'd take the chance and expose my pup to as many "outside" noises, people and children as I could. Now I go slowly and at distances to get him more accustomed to strangers. WE are almost ready to move on to a more crowded shopping lot and sit outside our vehicle watching...and doing sits & downs with treats when he stays focused on me. Its all working but I probably could have been past this. I didn't have to do this with other dogs I had but these poodles have energy and are smarter...they pick up your vibes.
 

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Completely agree with MaizieFrosty. Puppy kindergarden classes start them at about 8 weeks, and they're invaluable. My Poodle was four when I got him, but I took my last puppy out and about every single possible place. She was a Toy breed, so the Sherpa bag was perfect for her to snooze when she got tired. She was the most solid dog ever, not something always said about Toy breed dogs. A huge amount was her fantastic breeder and line; I added some amount via early and often socialization.

Suggest Eric also search here for Lily CD RE's posts on puppy socialization and Ian Dunbar's approach and thoughts, as he is a DVM. Also, hoping Eric might familiarize himself with Dr. Dodds' vaccination protocol, as it's quite advanced. Jean Dodds, DVM.

Can't wait to see your puppy, Eric :)! Btw, NM native though have spent most of my life in other states. Nice to see another Texan; loved my years there.
 

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Here's Dr. Dodd's vaccination protocol; but the one your vet will use, or that suggested by AKC are all legitimate schedules to consider.

https://www.animalhealthfoundation.net/blog/2017/12/dr-jean-dodds-dog-vaccine-protocol/

And another vote for early socialization- avoid letting your dog sniff the ground where potentially sick dogs have been such as public parks and the potty area near your vet. I like MF's idea of using a baby stroller - or carrying your dog in a bag. I train my dog for competitive dog sports. All my friends bring their new puppies to the dog training facilities to interact with healthy dogs and people. You might find a puppy class designed for socialization locally.
 

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For sure it’s important! Since he has never had a puppy before, I want him to understand that if he doesn’t immediately socialize with stranger dogs and foreign places etc in the first 8-15 weeks of the puppy’s life, he is not somehow damaging the puppy’s ability to be a well socialized dog.
I only got my puppy at 12 weeks old and I only vaccinated him at 12 weeks old - so I waited to take him on public grasses and high traffic public areas - until he was 15 weeks old (which he is now almost 16 weeks old) but in the meantime he met many family and friends, socialized with my cat, sat on my porch with me and watched neighbour dogs go by, met some neighbours who came to greet him (on his home turf), was in our fenced-in backyard and also came for car rides and experienced new smells - all in a controlled way for 21 days.... My boy has now been coming right into public with me and to pet stores and he’s great. In the time before he could go right into public I have done a lot of training and bonding and socializing - just close to home. As you said, dog park and public places off limits.


I'm going to slightly disagree with the part in bold. I do believe it's important to take your dog out and for them to meet other safe dogs before the critical socialization window closes. You may get lucky and have a dog that does fine after that window, but in many cases, they have socialization deficiencies. Plus, it would be hard to get people of all ages, genders, and ethnicities to come visit the puppy at home. But out in public you meet all types of people. As for bonding, the dog will bond whether you stay home or go out and about.

Like Skylar, I compete with my dogs. I can take them absolutely anywhere and expect them to be secure and well-behaved under most any circumstances. Their breeders got them off to an excellent start and then I put in a TON of work.
 
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