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Discussion Starter #1
Good evening all,

Just wanted to make a brief post regarding health testing and why breeders should make it such a huge priority.

There are many inheritable conditions within each breed-- hip dysplasia, eye issues, epilepsy, etc. Over the years, extensive research has been put into solving these issues and providing breeders with a way to prevent them. We do this by health testing-- i.e., ensuring our dogs are sound and of good health before allowing them to contribute to the gene pool. These can be DNA tests for dominant/recessive traits, or orthopedic tests to evaluate the dogs' bone and joint structure. Without testing, a breeder has no way of knowing what their dog might pass on. A "vet check" simply isn't good enough.

The more knowledge we have about inheritable conditions, the more power we have to prevent them. I would encourage everyone-- whether a breeder or a pet owner-- to help contribute to research done on Poodles by staying up to date with current studies. It is often very simple to do; fill out a form and submit a cheek swab, a voila. Invaluable information is provided to help breeders create a healthier, happier next generation. The Poodle Club of America frequently updates their page on studies in the works. Take a look and see if your Poodle qualifies :)

Pictured is Dash, who we have just submitted his DNA test for the following: PRA, vWD, DM, OCD, GM2, IVVD, and NEWS. He will also have his eyes, hips, and patellas examined and certified prior to being bred. When breeders are trusted with the health and welfare of our future dogs, we should be expecting extremely high standards of care and precision.

Regards,
Rachel
www.templecitypoodles.ca
466852
 

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Good evening all,

Just wanted to make a brief post regarding health testing and why breeders should make it such a huge priority.

There are many inheritable conditions within each breed-- hip dysplasia, eye issues, epilepsy, etc. Over the years, extensive research has been put into solving these issues and providing breeders with a way to prevent them. We do this by health testing-- i.e., ensuring our dogs are sound and of good health before allowing them to contribute to the gene pool. These can be DNA tests for dominant/recessive traits, or orthopedic tests to evaluate the dogs' bone and joint structure. Without testing, a breeder has no way of knowing what their dog might pass on. A "vet check" simply isn't good enough.

The more knowledge we have about inheritable conditions, the more power we have to prevent them. I would encourage everyone-- whether a breeder or a pet owner-- to help contribute to research done on Poodles by staying up to date with current studies. It is often very simple to do; fill out a form and submit a cheek swab, a voila. Invaluable information is provided to help breeders create a healthier, happier next generation. The Poodle Club of America frequently updates their page on studies in the works. Take a look and see if your Poodle qualifies :)

Pictured is Dash, who we have just submitted his DNA test for the following: PRA, vWD, DM, OCD, GM2, IVVD, and NEWS. He will also have his eyes, hips, and patellas examined and certified prior to being bred. When breeders are trusted with the health and welfare of our future dogs, we should be expecting extremely high standards of care and precision.

Regards,
Rachel
www.templecitypoodles.ca View attachment 466852
This may be an indelicate question, but do you have a general sense of how much you will have invested in all his tests and exams before you feel comfortable letting him sire the next generation?

The reason I'm asking is that I've had a few people say, "You spent HOW MUCH on a puppy?! You could have got one at [Craig's List/shelter/pet store] for $xxx."
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Here is a breakdown:
  • genetic testing: $300
  • genetic diversity: $100
  • patellas: $40
  • CAER eyes: $40/year
  • hips: $250
  • submission to the OFA: $60
Total = $790

I might include thyroid, cardiac, and dentition certifications at some point as well. In my experience, health testing is one of the most inexpensive yet invaluable tools we have available. Well worth every penny, for both the breeder and the buyer!
 

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Great post! I have kind of a weird question.... but I've always wondered how breeders decide the pricing of their puppies and what goes into that decision? I'm in no way interested in breeding my pets but I think maybe hearing how the breakdown/decisions of pricing puppies could help people understand why we pay the prices we do for our puppies.
 
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