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I'm starting to get a little freaked out by all the health concerns concerning the poodle. Starting to question if I want to get one. My German Shepherd that had to be put down a few months ago had an eye disease. Can't think right now what it was called. She had to have prescription meds put in her eyes two times a day for years. She died of Kidney disease. Had a Yellow Lab (wonderful dog) YEARS ago that I listened to my Vet and had spayed at 3 months old (yes I know now, not good). She had to have medication for leaking urine from maybe 6 months old until she died of bone cancer at 11. I have two rescues now. A male, Rusty, that I adopted when he was 4 months. He's almost 12 now, 65 lbs., and a terrier mix that is 4 years 14 lbs. ONE of my reasons for being interested in the Poodle was shedding. Man!!! could my Shepherd leave hair in the house. So can Rusty but not like Sascha did. So I want a puppy. Don't want to adopt because they will be spayed or neutered before they should be. Don't want HAIR. Tell me, should I get a Poodle?????
 

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We refer to our GSD as a German Shedder. Yuppers on the hair everywhere with them. I do love him though. He is a very sweet dog.


For any breed there will be health issues. It doesn't guarantee everything will be perfect, but only getting a dog from an excellent breeder can point you in the direction of good health and temperament (again for any breed).
 

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Contrary to what is often said, mutts can have health problems, too. Dogs are like people - they can suffer from a wide variety of issues that may or may not have a hereditary basis.
 

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My standard died from bloat. After that I did research and switched to feeding raw.

There is anecdotal research that shows bone density problems, such as hip dysplasia, could be caused by a lack of vitamin C.

Sometimes, there are things you can do in the care of your dog to keep them from "typical" problems.
 

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As with any other breed, there are health risks. If your breeder does the recommended Poodle Club of America health testing, you’re starting from the best possible place.
 

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Yes what has already been said. Later spaying/neutering is new yet to many. I've had many dogs done early without problem and 11 years for a lab is not so bad. You can have health issues with any dog, just like people..Buying from a reputable breeder is your best choice but there are no guarantees in life. You know the ol saying the only guarantees in life are you will pay taxes and die.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
We refer to our GSD as a German Shedder. Yuppers on the hair everywhere with them. I do love him though. He is a very sweet dog.


For any breed there will be health issues. It doesn't guarantee everything will be perfect, but only getting a dog from an excellent breeder can point you in the direction of good health and temperament (again for any breed).
I know you are right. It is one of the reasons I did not put down a deposit on a puppy before going to her place and seeing what is what. I made a mistake with my Shepherd. Breeder sounded wonderful on email and her site but so many red flags that I ignored when I got there. I hope I can use my head this time.
 

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Contrary to what is often said, mutts can have health problems, too. Dogs are like people - they can suffer from a wide variety of issues that may or may not have a hereditary basis.


Yes that is very true. I have been lucky with Rusty so far.
 

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Yes what has already been said. Later spaying/neutering is new yet to many. I've had many dogs done early without problem and 11 years for a lab is not so bad. You can have health issues with any dog, just like people..Buying from a reputable breeder is your best choice but there are no guarantees in life. You know the ol saying the only guarantees in life are you will pay taxes and die.
Ha ha. True enough on the guarantees in life.
 

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I know you are right. It is one of the reasons I did not put down a deposit on a puppy before going to her place and seeing what is what. I made a mistake with my Shepherd. Breeder sounded wonderful on email and her site but so many red flags that I ignored when I got there. I hope I can use my head this time.



If I am putting the dots together correctly you posted about a breeder who said she had bred moyens by breeding smaller standards to each other. I think people who replied there commented that this isn't the way to breed moyens. Red flag there. Keep asking us questions and we can help. If you want a smaller standard going to a good breeder who shows is likely to help you find a smaller dog since they won't be breeding for huge dogs. Judges tend not to put up very large standards.
 

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My standard died from bloat. After that I did research and switched to feeding raw.

There is anecdotal research that shows bone density problems, such as hip dysplasia, could be caused by a lack of vitamin C.

Sometimes, there are things you can do in the care of your dog to keep them from "typical" problems.
I am sorry to hear that your dog died from bloat. I was always worried about that with my Shepherd. I am told that feeding more than once a day is one of the things that helps with that. Is this not true?? Also, I am going to wait, if I get lucky enough to get a puppy, and spay or neuter later than the Vets recommend.
 

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It's totally luck of the draw. I have to say, our Heinz 57 mutts have lived long, healthy lives compared to our purebreds, overall. And yes, spoos have tons of health problems in the breed. One of mine is healthy, one is not as healthy. One thing you can do besides getting a dog from fully health tested parents (both of mine are) is to look for a breeder who does genetic diversity testing. The lower the coefficient of inbreeding, perhaps the healthier the dogs will be. Do your research--spoos are the best dogs in the world--but they are not the healthiest as a breed.
 

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My two standard poodles are 11 years old and never had any health issues. Both were spayed late. They have had a lot of exercise their whole lives and good quality food, but sadly I didn't choose a reputable breeder back then so mine really is luck of the draw! If I were to get another poodle I would be way more careful about choosing a breeder who health tests.

Sent from my VOG-L04 using Tapatalk
 

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Tossing another idea into your ring. Have you considered an oversize miniature poodle? There's not necessarily more breeders of mini's than standards (definitely more than true moyen breeders in the US) but that could give you additional choices.

You opened with your reasonable concerns of poodle health. What are the health risks that you're seeing that have you concerned?

I don't know if you're familiar with the standards for health testing so here's a copy of and a link to The Poodle Club of America's suggested tests:

https://poodleclubofamerica.org/health-concerns/

HEALTH TESTING IN POODLES

To help ensure the future health of Poodles, good breeders screen prospective Poodle parents with tests available for primary health issues in our breed. The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) and the Canine Health Information Center (CHIC) work with parent clubs to establish important screening criteria, and the following are tests needed to receive a CHIC number for each Poodle variety. Where noted, the PCA Foundation also recommends other DNA tests, some just recently developed as researchers identify faulty genes that cause disease. Eye exams to detect hereditary problems should be done yearly until an age suggested by your veterinary eye specialist. For more on poodle health, go to Poodle Club of America Foundation.

TOY POODLES

DNA Test for prcd-Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) from an OFA-approved laboratory.
Yearly Eye Exam by a boarded ACVO veterinary ophthalmologist.
Patellar Luxation: OFA Evaluation.

MINIATURE POODLES

Same CHIC requirements as Toy Poodles with the addition of: Hip Dysplasia: OFA or PennHIP Evaluation.

The PCA Foundation strongly recommends the DNA test for Miniature Poodle Dwarfism (Osteochondrodysplasia) to avoid breeding two carriers to each other and producing puppies affected with this deforming and crippling disorder. Research suggests that about 10 percent of Minis carry the mutation that causes this disease and that it is not limited to a few bloodlines.

STANDARD POODLES

Hip Dysplasia: OFA or PennHIP Evaluation.
Yearly Eye Exam by a boarded ACVO veterinary ophthalmologist.
Health Elective (at least one of the following three tests required for CHIC number):
OFA Thyroid Evaluation from an OFA approved laboratory.
OFA Sebaceous Adenitis (SA) Evaluation by an OFA approved dermatopathologist.
Heart Evaluation by an ACVIM boarded veterinary cardiologist.

The PCA Foundation recommends all three electives for Standard Poodles and also strongly recommends the following DNA tests from an OFA approved laboratory to easily avoid breeding two mutation carriers to each other and producing affected puppies:
DNA Test for Neonatal Encephalopathy with Seizures (NEwS) and
DNA Test for vonWillebrand’s Disease (vWD).

Note: A CHIC requirement across all participating breeds is that the dog must be permanently identified via microchip or tattoo in order to qualify for a CHIC number.

------------

I think just about every purebred dog will have certain health risks, but knowledge is growing all the time of those risks and how to breed away from them. Getting a pup or dog from a quality breeder is a bit like having insurance against these known risks.

Getting a crossbred or mixed breed dog has it's own set of risks. There's no history to look at, so as has been said, it's a complete roll of the dice.

If I were in your place, and we all have been, I'd be focusing on what I want in and from a dog and what kind of companion I want for the next 12-15 years. If a poodle fits you, don't let "might be" stop you.
 

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I'm starting to get a little freaked out by all the health concerns concerning the poodle. Starting to question if I want to get one. My German Shepherd that had to be put down a few months ago had an eye disease. Can't think right now what it was called. She had to have prescription meds put in her eyes two times a day for years. She died of Kidney disease. Had a Yellow Lab (wonderful dog) YEARS ago that I listened to my Vet and had spayed at 3 months old (yes I know now, not good). She had to have medication for leaking urine from maybe 6 months old until she died of bone cancer at 11. I have two rescues now. A male, Rusty, that I adopted when he was 4 months. He's almost 12 now, 65 lbs., and a terrier mix that is 4 years 14 lbs. ONE of my reasons for being interested in the Poodle was shedding. Man!!! could my Shepherd leave hair in the house. So can Rusty but not like Sascha did. So I want a puppy. Don't want to adopt because they will be spayed or neutered before they should be. Don't want HAIR. Tell me, should I get a Poodle?????
I've always had purebred dogs, half from rescue, half from puppyhood. All but one of them were put down due to arthritis and poor quality of life at an advanced old age. One collie had myasthenia gravis, but lived to 14, one German shorthair had a bad mitral valve and manageable heart failure, but lived to arthritic old age (rescue, but probably 14ish), the youngest, our male poodle, developed a hemangiosarcoma (not uncommon in older dogs of all breeds) at 12. My two black poodle half-sisters each lost a toe to toe cancer (mostly seen in older black dogs) and one of those two also survived bloat, they both lived to almost 14. My oldest dog lived to 14 years and 10 months, the youngest to 11 years and 363 days.

Recessive genetic diseases can only occur if both parents are carriers, so some of those diseases are more common in purebreds — but genetic testing has reduced their frequency. Dominant genetic diseases can be passed by either parent and can be just as common in mixed breeds as purebreds. Genetic testing is rarely performed on mixed breeds. Bloat, arthritis, certain cancers, fading immune systems from old age, orthopedic diseases and infectious diseases can occur in both purebreds and mixed breeds, but statistics are not always kept and advanced treatment not always performed for mixed breeds. Disease registries for animals are a relatively new concept and often maintained by breed clubs. "Mixed breeds are healthier" is a cliché rather than a statement of known fact.

Our two elderly black standard poodles had toe cancer. More than 90% of dogs who develop toe cancer are black and generally also elderly, large breed dogs. A friend's medium sized, 5 year-old, brown mixed breed also lost a toe to toe cancer. Stuff happens.

On the other hand, every really, really old dog (17 and 22!!) that I've ever encountered was a miniature poodle. They lose their teeth and develop cataracts, but some of them just keep ticking along.
 

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From what I am reading here you need to do a lot more research on how to pick an excellent breeder and a healthy dog. I insisted on health testing back 3 generations, and really researched and learned what the tests meant. I insisted on a breeder that paid attention to not having related dogs.

Do your research, investigate, learn everything you can. And remember, all dogs will die .... sadly. If people are having dogs die from the same illnesses I would look at their environment, I would look at how and what they feed them, and I would look at everything else, from exercise, to treats, to whether they walk their dogs on chemically sprayed lawns.

There are so many things in our environment now, and so many unhealthy things in commercial food, and treats, and toys. The same goes for us humans as well....
 

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Tossing another idea into your ring. Have you considered an oversize miniature poodle? There's not necessarily more breeders of mini's than standards (definitely more than true moyen breeders in the US) but that could give you additional choices.

You opened with your reasonable concerns of poodle health. What are the health risks that you're seeing that have you concerned?

I don't know if you're familiar with the standards for health testing so here's a copy of and a link to The Poodle Club of America's suggested tests:

https://poodleclubofamerica.org/health-concerns/

HEALTH TESTING IN POODLES

To help ensure the future health of Poodles, good breeders screen prospective Poodle parents with tests available for primary health issues in our breed. The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) and the Canine Health Information Center (CHIC) work with parent clubs to establish important screening criteria, and the following are tests needed to receive a CHIC number for each Poodle variety. Where noted, the PCA Foundation also recommends other DNA tests, some just recently developed as researchers identify faulty genes that cause disease. Eye exams to detect hereditary problems should be done yearly until an age suggested by your veterinary eye specialist. For more on poodle health, go to Poodle Club of America Foundation.

TOY POODLES

DNA Test for prcd-Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) from an OFA-approved laboratory.
Yearly Eye Exam by a boarded ACVO veterinary ophthalmologist.
Patellar Luxation: OFA Evaluation.

MINIATURE POODLES

Same CHIC requirements as Toy Poodles with the addition of: Hip Dysplasia: OFA or PennHIP Evaluation.

The PCA Foundation strongly recommends the DNA test for Miniature Poodle Dwarfism (Osteochondrodysplasia) to avoid breeding two carriers to each other and producing puppies affected with this deforming and crippling disorder. Research suggests that about 10 percent of Minis carry the mutation that causes this disease and that it is not limited to a few bloodlines.

STANDARD POODLES

Hip Dysplasia: OFA or PennHIP Evaluation.
Yearly Eye Exam by a boarded ACVO veterinary ophthalmologist.
Health Elective (at least one of the following three tests required for CHIC number):
OFA Thyroid Evaluation from an OFA approved laboratory.
OFA Sebaceous Adenitis (SA) Evaluation by an OFA approved dermatopathologist.
Heart Evaluation by an ACVIM boarded veterinary cardiologist.

The PCA Foundation recommends all three electives for Standard Poodles and also strongly recommends the following DNA tests from an OFA approved laboratory to easily avoid breeding two mutation carriers to each other and producing affected puppies:
DNA Test for Neonatal Encephalopathy with Seizures (NEwS) and
DNA Test for vonWillebrand’s Disease (vWD).

Note: A CHIC requirement across all participating breeds is that the dog must be permanently identified via microchip or tattoo in order to qualify for a CHIC number.

------------

I think just about every purebred dog will have certain health risks, but knowledge is growing all the time of those risks and how to breed away from them. Getting a pup or dog from a quality breeder is a bit like having insurance against these known risks.

Getting a crossbred or mixed breed dog has it's own set of risks. There's no history to look at, so as has been said, it's a complete roll of the dice.

If I were in your place, and we all have been, I'd be focusing on what I want in and from a dog and what kind of companion I want for the next 12-15 years. If a poodle fits you, don't let "might be" stop you.
I second the idea of picking an oversized mini if health is a top priority but you want a bigger dog than a typical mini. Nothing is a guarantee, so we can only talk about probability. And the probability is, a fully health-tested mini poodle from a top breeder with a healthy line is likely to live longer/healthier than a similarly well-bred standard poodle. Statistically, mini and toy poodles are two of the few breeds that, on average, outlive mutts (albeit just by a tiny fraction).

Kevin
 

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My two poodles have had life long good health (I have owned six other breeds). One was an oversize toy and my Ivan is a minature. Both poodles came from the same experienced breeder. She was devoted to breeding sound dogs and when we first met offered that I could talk to her long time veterinarian about her breeding program. The younger dog, now 16 1/2 is still with me--he is my shadow. He had his first health issue at 15 when he had a heart attack. Nevertheless, my vets now call him a miracle dog because he is doing so very well and taking just two meds. His sleeps more now, yet remains somewhat energetic--he often jumps up two steps going up stairs. He has some hearing and sight loss, but all in all remains very healthy, and I give credit to the breeder. If you find an excellent breeder, you have a great chance to get an exceptional companion. When my Ivan passes, I will find another.
 
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