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I was just on another forum and came upon a very detailed post about a poor owner who lost her beloved dog in a car accident. It brought me to tears.

I thought I would share some details to hopefully instill the need for specific and serious consideration when travelling with your puppers. I know many probably already drive with their dogs in crates or attached to seat belts, but there may be some who have not yet thought about it, as this person.

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They were on the highway with their dog happily in the back of their car laying on some comfy blankets, as usual. An object in the road ahead caused the driver in front of them to swerve and lose control, thus hitting several cars, including theirs. This caused their car not only to run into the barrier, but to flip at least twice.

The owner was okay, but they noticed the back window was gone, and so was their dog. Though fellow drivers who stopped to help, told them not to move, they climbed out anyways and started running down the highway to find their dog. Drivers pointed them in the direction they saw the dog running. But by the time they found the dog, it was where traffic had still been moving, and the dog was, to put it less graphically, dead. Hit by a car.

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Please use a safe method of transport for you dogs. There is only one harness that has passed crash testing and that is the one by Sleepypod. Or use a crate that has also passed crash testing. It is worth the extra expense!
 

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We have had this discussion many times and even recently, but it is always worth revisiting. I once saw a dog fall out of an open car window. It was on a slow traffic one way road in a park that has a dog run. The dog was fine, but seriously that was so stupid. I also had a spoo jump out of a car parked in front of the old PCA show site in Maryland. I had both Lily and Javelin (who was less than a year old) with me when this fog charged us. A friend grabbed the loose dog, but it made Lily so upset she wouldn't potty and was still so nervous that she soiled the rally excellent ring when we otherwise had a nice start on the course. I hate seeing dogs loose in cars for more reasons than I can list here. My dogs are harnessed and tethered, but even with those precautions in place I don't let them hang their heads out the windows. That also seems like a stupid idea since the dog could get an eye injury (or worse) from something hitting it.
 

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I apologize if there was a recent thread about this that I should have added to instead of making a new post.

That is a good point, I feel the same way about open windows. Dangerous and irresponsible but so very popular.
 

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Oh I think it is always worth bringing this back to the top of our discussions either in new threads or by reviving old ones. It is a very important discussion and new light is always shed on it when it comes up. The only really "useless" part of your post is that these people ended up with their dog brutally killed in traffic.
 
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Last month, we had a client bring his puppy to class with recent cuts above its eyes and a couple on its body. The client’s mother was transporting the dog in the car one day the prior week without restraint and with the window down. The dog jumped out of the window while the car was moving. The client was fortunate that the scrapes the dog got were the extent of its injuries. I noticed after the incident that the dog was still transported loose in the car (windows up at least).

My dogs ride in crates while traveling even if it is the mile to my mother’s house. I used to have whippets. They were Houdinis at getting out of harnesses, so the crates were always a safer bet.
 

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I'm always saddened to see or read about dogs that are not properly secured in the car. Especially when it has a tragic ending.

My minipoo is secured with a SleepyPod clickit harness. It is the safest travel option I could find that makes sense for us.

As for many of those crates, they are a great option if you're using one of the heavy duty crates designed to be safe in a car accident.

I also posted a link about the potential dangers of using a tether. They share the same dangers that they caused with they were used with children - and for good reason they are not used to transport children in the car. https://www.centerforpetsafety.org/pet-parents/extension-tether-advisory/

https://www.centerforpetsafety.org/

I wish that everyone would do some research on the various products and choose the safest choices. I know that I can't protect myself or my dog in every potential accident, but I can protect us for the most.
 

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As horrifying as car accidents are, they're more rare than your dog bolting out of the car and being killed in a store parking lot. Restrain your dog in the car, by all means, but make sure you train a safe exit from the car. The car door opening is an automatic cue for a stay. Body block the dog from leaving the car. Wait for a sustained connection with you, Noelle makes eye contact. Make sure you have the leash firmly in your hand. Check for traffic, when it is safe, release your dog. Every. Single. Time.

Yesterday Noelle was almost run over by an idiot who backed her car out without looking. Noelle's quick reflexes saved her, but that scared the hell out of both of us and some people who were watching. Be safe out there. There's a lot of idiots on the road.
 

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As horrifying as car accidents are, they're more rare than your dog bolting out of the car and being killed in a store parking lot. Restrain your dog in the car, by all means, but make sure you train a safe exit from the car. The car door opening is an automatic cue for a stay. Body block the dog from leaving the car. Wait for a sustained connection with you, Noelle makes eye contact. Make sure you have the leash firmly in your hand. Check for traffic, when it is safe, release your dog. Every. Single. Time.

Yesterday Noelle was almost run over by an idiot who backed her car out without looking. Noelle's quick reflexes saved her, but that scared the hell out of both of us and some people who were watching. Be safe out there. There's a lot of idiots on the road.
Oh no Click, how scary for you and Noelle. I’m so very glad you are both okay.

You bring up a very important topic, that is, being safe exiting a car. Babykins always jumps up with excitement when I release her seatbelt. She’s a jack in the box with poodle springs. Sometimes she will jump around in the car because she can’t wait to go somewhere fun. I always make her sit before giving her the release word (free) and hand signal that she can leave the car. I think the sit helps her settle down and collect herself before leaving the car so she’s not bouncing around outside the car. I vary the time how long she has to sit so she doesn’t anticipate.
 

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Click I am very glad you and Noelle are okay. Parking lots really can be a horror show.


Safe exits from cars are important to train. Both poodles know that I expect a lie down to happen as I am opening the car door in the back where they are. I have trained them to jump down right between me and the open door and not to take a flying leap. Peeves also has a reasonably good car exit. On the other hand a number of years ago BF had gone on a trip, but hadn't been able to take Becks (previous GSD) to the vet for boarding before he left. I stayed one night with him and took him to the vet the next day. That dog knew me but didn't really take me very seriously. I had no problem getting him in the back seat of my car, but was pretty gobsmacked when he flew over me as I opened my door to get out and jumped out of my car. Thankfully I was able to get a hold of the leash as he left and was still seated so I could sort of lean back to stop him. He weighed about 110 pounds. That vet's office is right on a busy four lane road. It scared the heck out of me.
 
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Thanks. We were on our way back to my car when suddenly a car backed up without looking where she was going. Noelle was way too close to the rear right tire for comfort and leapt out of the way. Two people who saw it screamed. I was horrified. I will have to think about how we get to our car through a crowded parking lot. I usually look for white back up lights and pay very close attention, but this was too fast for me to be prepared.

With Miss Babykins, that sit is a good idea. Long sustained eye contact and pure calm are my rules for exiting the car. And with the GSD, Catherine, wow. I'm glad you were able to hang on.
 

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I also consistently ask for a sit immediately upon leaving the car. This helps Zephyr to understand that his exit from the car should be calm and controlled rather than a wild lunge.
 

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I am a fanatic on training them to stay in the car, it is bad enough with one, but 3 they have to be under control. The have car sets, and I put 2 in on one side of the care and the 3rd from the other side of the car. They get really excited when we get home or to a destination. I make them all 3 set in their car set, take one at at a time, keeping them between me and the car (shorten the leash) and the other 2 has to sit and wait their turn to get out.
 

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We have had this discussion many times and even recently, but it is always worth revisiting. I once saw a dog fall out of an open car window. It was on a slow traffic one way road in a park that has a dog run. The dog was fine, but seriously that was so stupid. I also had a spoo jump out of a car parked in front of the old PCA show site in Maryland. I had both Lily and Javelin (who was less than a year old) with me when this fog charged us. A friend grabbed the loose dog, but it made Lily so upset she wouldn't potty and was still so nervous that she soiled the rally excellent ring when we otherwise had a nice start on the course. I hate seeing dogs loose in cars for more reasons than I can list here. My dogs are harnessed and tethered, but even with those precautions in place I don't let them hang their heads out the windows. That also seems like a stupid idea since the dog could get an eye injury (or worse) from something hitting it.
Hello Lily, how exactly do you tether your dogs to the seat? I had my puppy in a Ezydog harness tethered to the Ezydog seat belt attachment. But when my puppy sits up and turns, the tether gets caught in his front legs and starts to pull tension against him. When I'm driving I can't easily adjust it, so I feel it's more dangerous to have him in this configuration. I've tried moving the tether and shortening it but it didn't help much without restricting him too much.

Could you please give me advice/recommendation?

Sarah
 

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Just asking to clarify, is the attachment you're using the longer example pic or the shorter one?

There are safer devices, pricey, but much less expensive than an ER visit. Sleepypod is the highest rated brand for safety. It's gone thru the same crash testing that is used for humans.

Here's the link to the CPS testing

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=13&ved=2ahUKEwjF5ra25JngAhXIVt8KHVs3CpoQFjAMegQIBxAB&url=https://www.centerforpetsafety.org/test-results/harnesses/cps-approved-harnesses/&usg=AOvVaw1rnWbpvkIjLj1R6msHakUk

and to the home page for more equipment

https://www.centerforpetsafety.org/cps-certified/
 

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The attachment I am using is the one on the larger dog that has the seatbelt loop. But I attach that loop to a tether that is about as long as the one on the little dog to my puppy's harness. If I were to attach his harness directly to the Ezy dog seatbelt loop he would not be able to lay down. I was planning on purchasing the sleepypod harness once my puppy grew more. He's now 10 months old and 47 lbs, but I expect him to grow more. What size sleepypod do you use on your spoo?

Thank you!

Sarah
 

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Hello Lily, how exactly do you tether your dogs to the seat? I had my puppy in a Ezydog harness tethered to the Ezydog seat belt attachment. But when my puppy sits up and turns, the tether gets caught in his front legs and starts to pull tension against him. When I'm driving I can't easily adjust it, so I feel it's more dangerous to have him in this configuration. I've tried moving the tether and shortening it but it didn't help much without restricting him too much.

Could you please give me advice/recommendation?

Sarah

I have tethers that clip to the seat belt buckle receivers at one end and a leash clip style clip at the other end that attaches to their harnesses. If your dog is getting tangled I think you just need to teach them to be relaxed so they aren't hopping around too much. They do get used to the system. they have medium size sleepypod sport harnesses. It is a little big on Lily but just right on Javelin (37 and just under 50 pounds respectively).
 
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It's so sad to hear of this happening. It breaks my heart.
We were sitting at breakfast today and a truck pulled up and my son mentioned the dog in the front seat with the window down and head out the window. I told him we would not ever allow that. It is not safe and irresponsible.
We do use a basic harness and seat belt leash where he can sit and lay, but want to upgrade to a better safer harness.

Sent from my SM-J727R4 using Tapatalk
 
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