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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve been discussing this with Peggy’s trainer and she feels driving a new puppy home is better than flying. Less traumatic, good for bonding, etc.

I’d love to hear from anyone who’s actually done this type of drive. Peggy’s breeder was five hours away. We managed that fine. But what about a trip involving multiple overnights in hotels or motels? Possibly a week or more. Would it really depend on the puppy’s temperament?

P.S. No, we don’t have a puppy lined up. Yes, we have our eye on a couple of breeders, none of which are even remotely close to us. So envious of those of you on the other coast right now!
 

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I think my parents' last dog was driven partway from/by the breeder and stay in a motel one night before being picked up by my folks who drove the dog the rest of the way home. I'd do it I think, but one night in a hotel would be my limit. It just feels so important to get to a home base where you can start your routines. Dealing with a tiny non-housetrained puppy on someone else's carpets would stress me out even if it didn't make too much of a difference for the dog.
 

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I won't fly a dog regardless of age. Even with a pet nanny. Drove a toy pup from West Palm Beach to New Orleans. Also drove 2 young dogs from New Orleans to San Diego and 2 senior dogs from San Diego to New Orleans. Not bad BUT you need to book your motel reservations in advance because I found a lot of motels won't take pets. Not a lot of choice in some places. Also, I recommend bringing someone with you so I person stays with the pup while the other goes out to eat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Dealing with a tiny non-housetrained puppy on someone else's carpets would stress me out even if it didn't make too much of a difference for the dog
That’s exactly what I’m thinking. We got Peggy straight onto a routine and I’m sure it made a difference in the ease of her training. I can’t imagine figuring out a new set-up every night, and driving each day after a broken sleep.
 

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I won't fly a dog regardless of age. Even with a pet nanny. Drove a toy pup from West Palm Beach to New Orleans. Also drove 2 young dogs from New Orleans to San Diego and 2 senior dogs from San Diego to New Orleans. Not bad BUT you need to book your motel reservations in advance because I found a lot of motels won't take pets. Not a lot of choice in some places. Also, I recommend bringing someone with you so I person stays with the pup while the other goes out to eat.
What’s your reason for refusing to fly with a dog? He or she would be in the cabin with us.
 

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Maybe the dog would fly in the cabin with you. It's up to the crew as to where the dog actually flies. The law governing air travel gives the airlines a lot of discretion. (I'm assuming you would fly commercial and not on a private jet.)
 

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Maybe the dog would fly in the cabin with you. It's up to the crew as to where the dog actually flies. The law governing air travel gives the airlines a lot of discretion. (I'm assuming you would fly commercial and not on a private jet.)
I have never heard of someone being forced to put their puppy in cargo, assuming of course that they’ve purchased an appropriate ticket and the puppy is properly sized and in an approved carrier.
 

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Also, pups don't fare well if they have to travel in an overhead bin. I assume your intent is to fly the pup in a carrier on your lap, a purchased seat or under your seat. Again, it's up to the airline.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Also, pups don't fare well if they have to travel in an overhead bin. I assume your intent is to fly the pup in a carrier on your lap, a purchased seat or under your seat. Again, it's up to the airline.
An overhead bin?? Why would you ever?

My friend flies frequently with her dog. I have never heard of her having any issues like what you’re describing.
 

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An overhead bin?? Why would you ever?

My friend flies frequently with her dog. I have never heard of her having any issues like what you’re describing.
Unfortunately I have heard stories of people being forced to put their pets in the overhead bin, and some have died. I can't imagine the rationale but it's possible that some seats don't have the space in front or some airline set-ups can't accommodate the carriers under foot. Planning and double and triple checking with the airline should be ok with a puppy small enough to carry on a plane and an airline with clear policies that others can vouch for.
 

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This took a really, really weird turn. 😂

I would much rather fly like so many people do every day than drive cross country with a puppy. Aside from the logistics and wanting to get into routine, Starla was SO carsick. It took an hour of misery to get her home. I can’t imagine putting a puppy through days of that. Maybe she was the exception? But it seems from this forum that many young poodles experience car sickness.
 
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I have several friends who have either shipped puppies as a breeder, or else had puppies shipped to them from a breeder (with some cross-over is a couple of cases), and in every case, the puppy came out of their crate happy and wagging their tail.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
My bad. I'm a lawyer. What do I know.
Then you have a unique perspective on this. What would be the best way for someone to handle a situation in which they’re being asked to put their dog’s life at risk? Just ask to deplane?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I have several friends who have either shipped puppies as a breeder, or else had puppies shipped to them from a breeder (with some cross-over is a couple of cases), and in every case, the puppy came out of their crate happy and wagging their tail.
Yeah, the breeder I’m particularly interested in has had one owner fly out from California to pick up their puppy and then fly home. She said it was tiring, but worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This took a really, really weird turn. 😂

I would much rather fly like so many people do every day than drive cross country with a puppy. Aside from the logistics and wanting to get into routine, Starla was SO carsick. It took an hour of misery to get her home. I can’t imagine putting a puppy through days of that. Maybe she was the exception? But it seems from this forum that many young poodles experience car sickness.
It really did. Lol.

I do know that delays can be a nightmare if you’re flying with a dog. That would be my biggest concern. Also, the thought of keeping him or her crammed in a bag doesn’t make me especially happy. I don’t think there’s a perfect solution here, other than to give up on those breeders.
 

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I’ll suggest “Bring Fido” if you travel with a dog or dogs. I have been traveling back and forth from Arizona to Tennessee and back each year for almost 10 years, and this app. is very helpful. They have already done the research on pet fees, number of dogs allowed and sizes allowed. Check it out.
 

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I have driven a new puppy home from a breeder for 60 miles. The pup threw up all the way home (windy mountain road and first extended car outing). I have flown from Texas to California with a new pup (non-stop) in a carrier. He slept most of the time and didn't seem stressed. I have read a few horror stories about stupid flight attendants insisting that dogs be put in the overhead bin, but that is NOT the norm. Neither of these was my dog. I was along for support.
 

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It may be a fluke, but there's always that last-minute plane change. First-class can end up in economy next to the toilet said the voice of experience. That would leave little room for a puppy.
(Yes, you can get a refund but it would still be a stretch...or not room for a stretch.)
 

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Ritter was pretty horrified by his 9 hour trip. He wouldn't come out of his carrier, even though the door was open, and he peed in it. I wouldn't have wanted to deal with a pee covered puppy in a hotel bathtub. I wonder if he would have been more comfortable in a van or a camper with enough room for us to set up a playpen with a pee pad under it.

I did take Pogo and Snarky on an overnight trip when they were around six months old. By that time they were used to car rides and had all their shots. It was pretty uneventful, apart from them catching fleas at one of the hotels.
 
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