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Any recommendations for a good harness to help with pulling?Thanks
Hi, and welcome to PF! It looks like from your avatar that you have a Spoo? I use a Sporn Harness for my Standard Poodle, Sisko. Its given me the best control over him, but the extra attachment for it broke off one day while Sisko and I were playing, so I wouldn't recommend using the extra attachment.

What's your Poodle's name? What's s/he name? I would love to hear me about you guys.

P.S we love photos!
 

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Personally I don't use harnesses to stop a dog from pulling. Some of them restrict the dog's movement and can be uncomfortable or even injurious for the dog. I work at stopping pulling on a flat buckle collar by stopping my movement when the dog pulls. I then wait until the dog decides straining at the end of the leash is not going to result in getting to what ever they are trying to reach. Generally at that point they check in and I praise and treat. As they progress they will move closer to you to take the pressure off the collar. The alternative is to use a pinch collar so that the dog corrects itself more directly than you doing so. You have to know how to use a pinch collar properly (yes I know some people believe there is no way to do so). I have talked about how to introduce, use and later fadee the use of pinch collars many times here so you can search for that if you are interested.

For toy size dogs I think harnesses are usually better since it is too easy for them to get seriously injured if they are power pullers or the handler is inclined towards collar pops. Their tracheas are too delicate.
 
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We use the front flip on a Freedom Harness. It absolutely does not prevent pulling on its own, but complements positive reinforcement techniques by gently redirecting their body back to you when the dog applies pressure.

Harnesses with a tightening action like the Sporn (or even, more subtly, the back clip on the Freedom Harness) can increase frustration, pair stimuli with negative sensations, and even cause pain over time.

I'd use these types of harnesses only as a last line of defense—meaning you first put in the work to teach your dog what you expect of him or her.

(Note: I could not have figured out how to communicate this to Peggy without the help of a trainer. I couldn't get the reward rhythms right. I was too chatty. I was giving mixed messages... I could go on and on! But we actually had a major breakthrough during one random class. It was like something finally clicked for me, and I was reminded that doing the wrong thing over and over and over again, regardless of how much time and effort I was putting in, in no way compares to the power of doing the RIGHT thing even once.

Poodles are so smart.

Once we figure out how to communicate our desires to them, they're like, "Well why didn't you say so????" Then the harness can just be there as a backup, in case of something unexpectedly thrilling or dangerous, which might make even the best poodle's brain turn off.)
 

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If you’re going to try this approach, I’d suggest using a martingale flat collar so that even pressure is applied when the dog pulls. This company makes some nice ones, but they’re pretty easy to come by.
Well I do like martingales for puppies since I find their bigger on leash problem is usually putting on the brakes and pulling out of flat buckle collars, but for pulling on leash training I actually think it is better for the dog to feel the pressure at the front of the neck. I am interested to know why you would use a martingale in this setting.
 
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Well I do like martingales for puppies since I find their bigger on leash problem is usually putting on the brakes and pulling out of flat buckle collars, but for pulling on leash training I actually think it is better for the dog to feel the pressure at the front of the neck. I am interested to know why you would use a martingale in this setting.
I think it’s better to put even pressure rather than to have an overexcited dog choke themselves, which is pretty uncomfortable for them and can potentially cause damage to their throat. It really depends on how insistent or excited the dog is...

I’ve seen full grown dogs also slip out of their flat collar when trying to go after a squirrel or other dog. In general, I just think they’re a safer option.
 

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What I do with a pulling dog, regardless of size or breed.

Using a harness and a 20 foot lead, I go to an open area. Start walking at a brisk pace. When dog gets in front of you or decides to chase something, walk in a different direction so that the dog must follow you. Repeat over and over. Do not worry about a crisp heel, you have twenty feet in any direction. At some point the dog will notice how crazy you are and will start paying attention to you and where you are. When you find that you can walk or run in any direction and the dog follows with no pulling, you are successful.

For your next step, you again go to the large area and let the dog have the 20 feet. When he is following you and staying within the 20 feet, call him to you and get him in the heel position, praise and treat. Keep calling him back to you for praise and treat and give it a name. Try "heel". Using the treats, keep him at your side longer and longer. As he perfects walking at the heel, use a cue to release him. Something like "at ease" or "romp", or whatever you like that you aren't likely to say by mistake in the middle of traffic.

I would then move to a ten foot lead and an area that is smaller, like a city or suburban neighborhood.
 
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