Poodle Forum banner
1 - 20 of 159 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Happy is moving to South Korea! I’ve been selected for a position at Camp Humphreys near Pyeongtaek, about an hour or so south of Seoul. We will likely travel the weekend of 23/24 April. This has been in the works since October, but only became official yesterday. We’re excited to be headed over as a family this time. I’ve been stationed there twice before, but as a bachelor. I will miss our N. VA forests and trails, a sentiment surely shared by Happy, but I expect Happy will have a pretty good life in the land of the morning calm as Korea has become quite dog friendly and she’ll be able to join us on many adventures.

There is NO quarantine for dogs coming from the U.S as long as I follow the rules. Happy just need to be up on all her shots, get a clear certificate of health and pass a rabies titre test. We’ve already researched the requirements and they’re not overly complicated. Besides the stress of closing out one household and reestablishing it on the other side of the world, I am very anxious about getting Happy over there – mainly the flight! I’m irrationally concerned about putting her in the belly of an aircraft for a minimum of 11 hours. I would gladly plunk down full fare if she could occupy a seat right next to me. As I understand it, there’s a limit to the number of hours a dog can travel in the belly of a plane. This means we’ll have to depart the U.S. from the west coast. I will choose Seattle as it offers the shortest flight time (11 hours). I know the odd are greatly in our favor that nothing bad is going to happen, but I’m really stressing over this.

I’m also concern that Happy has not come into her second heat. We were putting off spay until after this, or the next, heat. I’m sure it’s not a good idea for Happy to fly until she is completely healed. With 23 April just around the corner, I’m quickly running out of time. I could delay the spay until after we settle in our new home, but I really wanted to have a gastropexy done and I’m not sure how available the procedure is in Korea.

Here are my first questions:

Moving happy to Korea – the flight. I’ve already decided on two possible courses of action:

A. I will drive to Seattle in order to minimize Happy’s time in the air. I can ship our car from there. It’s a 4 to 5 day drive. Pros: least time in the air, a big road trip for happy. Cons: Increases our travel time to at least 7 days + 5 of those days are in the car with my 6yo son.

B. Fly non-stop to Seattle (about six hours) and rest a day or two before boarding the flight to Korea. Pros: breaks up the trip for Happy and reduces the stress of a 22 hour travel day, minimizes her time separated from the family.

Which would you do, A or B?

Spay: Should I do it immediately, or wait until after were settle?

That’ll be it for now. I plan to use this this thread to both document Happy’s move and to seek your wisdom. I’ll update as things progress.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,599 Posts
I would do B for a few reasons.
1. I can’t imagine my kids trapped in a car + on a plane for a week. We would all be so frazzled.
2. I haven’t made it to the PNW yet, and it’s high on my list of places to fly to once we can fly again.

to answer your spay question, can your SIL (is it your SIL?) call her vet and see if they do pexys or if they can recommend someone who does? Can your vet do the spay/pexy NOW or do they need lead time/have you spoken with them?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mfmst and Liz

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I would do B for a few reasons.
1. I can’t imagine my kids trapped in a car + on a plane for a week. We would all be so frazzled.
2. I haven’t made it to the PNW yet, and it’s high on my list of places to fly to once we can fly again.

to answer your spay question, can your SIL (is it your SIL?) call her vet and see if they do pexys or if they can recommend someone who does? Can your vet do the spay/pexy NOW or do they need lead time/have you spoken with them?
I know my wife prefers option b. As for the spay, I haven't consulted my vet yet. We do have a good friend who lives where we'll settle who could check if there's a local vet who does the plexy.

Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,480 Posts
I might do option C, which isn’t mentioned, ie just do one long flight and get it done with. Why ? Because once Haply is done with the first trip, it’s going to be extremely stressful for her to have to go through it a second time. She won’t want to go in the crate.

I would ask my vet for some calming medication and make her very comfortable in her crate and just do it. Even for you, it’s going to be hard putting her back on the plane a second time. Especially if she is anxious and begging not to go.

I would just want it all done in one shot. Best for dog and humans in my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,328 Posts
I agree with Dechi, ask your vet for medication to help keep her calm during the plane trip. Test it out well before hand so you know how she reacts to the medication.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
14,232 Posts
I would be stressing, too. Just remind yourself that plenty of dogs have managed the journey and Happy will, too.

Like Dechi, I’d avoid putting her through two flights. And I would do this even if it meant driving the first leg. Is there any possibility of sending your wife and son on ahead and you just tackle this part of the trip with Happy? Could be a fun adventure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Hi, we have been looking at similar issues, as we are planning to relocate from Japan to France later this year. Our prior dog was a Polish Lowland Sheepdog who, like Happy, was too big to travel in the cabin. We now have a toy poodle, so that issue is a bit easier, but I did some of the research before our sheepdog passed away unexpectedly in late 2020. It may be cost-prohibitive, but there are service like this that can help with relocating a dog: Bringing Dogs and Cats to South Korea | Korea Pet Import and Transport | PetRelocation
My understanding was that there may be some advantage to using a service like this as they can ship via cargo and thereby avoid some of the risks involved in shipping a dog in cargo on a passenger flight. It might be worth asking.
 

·
Registered
Tyler
Joined
·
338 Posts
I would opt for B for the reasons you stated.

We had our dog and cat neutered at the vet clinic at Osan Airbase. (Camp Humphreys was a small base back then, unlike now, so Osan was the go-to base for most everything. Lots has changed since 1977.) Have you contacted the Camp Humphreys' vet clinic? I'm sure they could answer your questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
just do one long flight and get it done with
I may be mistaken but as I understand it, the non-stop from Dulles to Seoul exceeds the amount of time a dog can be in the belly of an aircraft. I’m basing this on a co-workers experience when he brought his dogs out of Korea last year. He had to land in Los Angeles before proceeding to the east coast. Also, not every aircraft is capable of transporting animals down below. It may have been the planes coming into Dulles are not equipped for animal transport.. I agree with you that a single non-stop would be less stressful and preferable. I will consult the airline to see if the non-stop is an option.

ask my vet for some calming medication and make her very comfortable in her crate
With regards to calming medicine, I was told sedating dogs was no longer done because of it increased chances of death. Again, I will consult the airline and my vet to see if this is true.

I’ll definitely post my finding. Thanks for the advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I currently work on Ft Belvoir and, as a military retiree and Army civilian, I’m able to leverage the military veterinarian for our move. I’ll also be able to utilize the vet on Camp Humphreys. I’m headed over the Belvoir vet this afternoon. I really doubt the Army vet can/will do the plexy, but I’m sure I can find a good vet on the economy to do the procedure. BTW, Camp Humphreys is huge now!
 

·
Registered
Tyler
Joined
·
338 Posts
I really doubt the Army vet can/will do the plexy, but I’m sure I can find a good vet on the economy to do the procedure. BTW, Camp Humphreys is huge now!
I wonder .... Given how many MP dogs are GSDs, it might be sop. I found this article by an ex military vet - Beating the Bloat – Central Animal Hospital.

Yep - completely different place now. Anjeong-ri was a small village, and Pyeongtek a very small city. There were mud brick farm houses in the surrounding countryside. And most of the buildings on Camp Humphreys were quonset huts, heated by kerosene stoves. We lived in a small apt in a family compound off base.

Damn - I'm feeling nostalgic.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,996 Posts
Military Working Dogs US
(e) Final Acceptance. Dogs meeting medical and training criteria are officially accepted, given a permanent tattoo number and assigned an ideal weight range. Intact females and cryptorchid males are neutered at this time, any necessary dental care is performed, and all dogs receive a prophylactic gastropexy. Dogs enter training following recovery...

b. GDV was a major cause of death in MWDs for decades; however, GDV is a rare occurrence in DOD MWDs now, since performance of a prophylactic gastropexy was instituted in 2009 for all new DOD MWDs. In this procedure, a permanent surgical adhesion between the stomach and inner peritoneal wall is created during an elective procedure that prevents volvulus and has dramatically reduced the incidence of GDV and gastric dilatation in the MWD population. However, veterinary personnel may still encounter emergently ill working dogs with GDV, because most Special Operations Forces, contractor and allied working dogs have not been prophylactically gastropexied. Although rare, failure of the surgical adhesion site after a gastropexy has been reported.

ARN17825_TBMED298_FINAL.pdf (army.mil)

Signs Point to Yes :)🎱
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Looks like we may have gone a bit small on the crate. We got one rated for dogs 50-70lbs, but the airline guidelines say the crate needs to be at least as tall as the dog including bedding. I've been told horror stories about people showing up at the airport and being told their crate is too small. The airline was happy to sell one large enough, but at a greatly inflated price. So it looks like this one is going back in exchange for the ginormous one.

Dog Water dog Dog breed Carnivore Toy
Dog Dog breed Carnivore Companion dog Fawn


Other news: The military veterinarian can, and will, take care of Happy's health certs and titre test. I picked up all the info yesterday and am getting the necessary records together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,316 Posts
Maybe I didn't read carefully enough. Did you say you are willing to pay for a separate ticket for her, or did I read that somewhere else? (It is 1:15 am and I am so sleepy!) If you are willing to do that, is the airline willing to let her ride say on the floor next to you? Is she super well trained for being in the plane and airport? My spoo is my service dog and so that is the way I travel. For such a long trip I would be concerned for some flight delay or cancellation and having her too long in the belly of some plane, etc. I am looking forward to hearing how this comes out.
 
1 - 20 of 159 Posts
Top