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Hi, I was wondering how many Standard Poodle owners like to use hand signals to communicate with your dogs and which ones?

Cheers.
 

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Do you mean training with physical gestures instead of verbal commands? I generally lay a silent foundation before I add a verbal cue. But I can get a little too chatty with her, which can be confusing. So even once she knows the verbal cue, I sometimes like to shut up for a whole training session, or mix it up a bit.

Sit: I clench two fists high up my chest, like I'm pulling up hard on a horse's reins.

Lay Down: I extend my arm straight out and down until I'm pointing at the ground in front of her.

Wait: I make an open-handed "stop" signal with one hand.

Come a little closer: I curl my fingers towards me in a rapid coaxing motion.

Up onto something, down off something, or go to your bed/mat/clearly defined area: I just point wherever I'd like her to go.

Left spin: I pinch my fingers together like I've got her on a string and swirl my fingers once in a circle, counterclockwise above her head.

Right spin: Same as above, but I swirl them clockwise.

Go around: I draw a line with my finger in the air, straight out from my belly button towards the object I want her to go around, and then (as though I'm drawing a "J") I hook the short end in the direction I want her to go.

Up from a down to a sit: I pinch my fingers and "pull" them straight up, as though lifting her with a string.

Up from a sit to a stand: Same as above but the line angles from her face towards my forehead.

Over: I point to a jump and draw a rainbow with my finger. I can also lift a leg, which cues her to jump over my leg.
 

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Do you mean training with physical gestures instead of verbal commands? I generally lay a silent foundation before I add a verbal cue. But I can get a little too chatty with her, which can be confusing. So even once she knows the verbal cue, I sometimes like to shut up for a whole training session, or mix it up a bit.
My understanding is that what PTP described is common. I've also heard that dogs in general prefer hand gestures to voice commands, because gestures are more natural to them since they're so adept at reading body language.
 

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All dogs generally read body language more readily than spoken language. Words do not innately mean things to them. If I tell a dog to sit they will sit once they have been trained to associate that sound with that action. They are perfectly capable of learning and remembering that and emitting the correct response. If I tell a young child to sit they will be adaptive in their response and sit on whatever thing seems an appropriate place to sit.

For advanced levels of performance obedience there are exercises in which signals only are the main aspect of what is to be done, no words allowed there. I have trained all of our dogs to understand signals and words separately but can also use them together. The main signals required for utility obedience are sit, stand, drop (lie down) and come front. Many of us who show use lots of other nonverbal orders for things like stay and wait, get to heel, give attention and so forth.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Do you mean training with physical gestures instead of verbal commands? I generally lay a silent foundation before I add a verbal cue. But I can get a little too chatty with her, which can be confusing. So even once she knows the verbal cue, I sometimes like to shut up for a whole training session, or mix it up a bit.

Sit: I clench two fists high up my chest, like I'm pulling up hard on a horse's reins.

Lay Down: I extend my arm straight out and down until I'm pointing at the ground in front of her.

Wait: I make an open-handed "stop" signal with one hand.

Come a little closer: I curl my fingers towards me in a rapid coaxing motion.

Up onto something, down off something, or go to your bed/mat/clearly defined area: I just point wherever I'd like her to go.

Left spin: I pinch my fingers together like I've got her on a string and swirl my fingers once in a circle, counterclockwise above her head.

Right spin: Same as above, but I swirl them clockwise.

Go around: I draw a line with my finger in the air, straight out from my belly button towards the object I want her to go around, and then (as though I'm drawing a "J") I hook the short end in the direction I want her to go.

Up from a down to a sit: I pinch my fingers and "pull" them straight up, as though lifting her with a string.

Up from a sit to a stand: Same as above but the line angles from her face towards my forehead.

Over: I point to a jump and draw a rainbow with my finger. I can also lift a leg, which cues her to jump over my leg.
Thanks for such a detailed response, it's much appreciated.
 

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No there are not standard signals nor are there standard orders. Some things are more practical than others, but it is all pretty much up to the handler. I used to see a guy with a utility dog and for the jumps he said this one and the other one to the dog. You can say apple for down if you want. the key is to be consistent. I was playing around with a friend's spoo at class last week and I kept using my orders and my friend kept telling me the dog didn't know the words (since they were mine)...
 

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We love hand signalsWe do both, verbal and hand signals. We don’t do them for everything but I’d say a good half of our commands have non-verbal signals. Bobby will sit when we say, “Sit” but a palm up or a snap of the fingers will communicate just as well. I’m even working teaching him to sit with just using my eyes. 😂 He’s not totally trained with that but he’s learning. He is one of those smart poodles, right?😉
I slap my thigh for “Heel,” point 2 fingers at eyes for the “Look at Me” signal which we affectionately call “Eyeballs.” Thumb up for “OK.” We also have hand signals for “Down,” “Stand,” “Stay,” “Free,” “Quiet,” “Come,”
“Hug,” “Play Dead,” “Crawl,” “Back,” “Wait,” and there are few more but these are these are the basics for us.
we use them interchangeably.
I think teaching and using hand signals is fun but so practical too!
l
 

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That's really good to know... Poodles really are incredibly smart creatures. I collect my first spoo later this year. I can't wait to start with my new pup. Thanks again for your informative reply. It's much appreciated.
 
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