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So I haven't read anyone's responses but here is my advice. Been a professional groomer for 12 years and started showing my standard poodle the beginning of this year and have learned how to groom and take care of the show coat...

DRYING:
1) When drying a poodle with a HV dryer, do you start brushing the coat while it's still wet-wet or damp or ???

- Pet coat poodle: depending on the coat lengths, I usually just use the HV and don't bother brushing until it's completely dry

- Show coat poodle: I brush only when wet and if I have to brush a dry spot I spritz it with water or a conditioning spray. I will use my comb while drying at the same time to get a straighter finish

2) What grooming tool (brush and/or comb) do you prefer to use when drying to get the coat straight (and does this change for different coat areas and degree of dryness)?

- Pet coat poodle: I use a slicker brush and metal comb

- Show coat poodle: I use a pin brush and a metal comb. Never use a slicker on a show coat

3) Do you start drying and/or brushing a certain area of does that depend on the individual poodle and/or trim? I dry the shortest hair first and dry the head and ears last. On the show coat I dry the bracelets and rosettes first.

4) What is the primary difference between a HV dryer and a stand (heat) dryer? Can you get the straight, fluffy look with one or the other or do you need both? (ie., what are the pros/cons of both). I can get the straight fluffy look on both with no difference. The stand up doesn't blow air out as forcefully so on the show coat it is better becAuse less risk of damage and breakage to the coat, but honestly I rarely use the stand up on my show dog because I have never damaged her hair by using the HV on low while I brush the more delicate coat. Stand up is also really good for dogs who don't like the HV dryer around their heads. The stand up is quieter and softer so dogs tend to allow it on their heads.

GROOMING:
5) What products do you recommend to prevent razor burn on poodles with sensitive skin--worst case scenario (ie., Skin Works)? (One of my poodles doesn't get razor burn but will scratch later and give himself a rash!).

Oatmeal shampoo is generally soothing enough to reduce the risk. I usually will shave sensitive areas before the bath and then wash them in a high quality oatmeal shampoo and this usually deflects any razor burn or rashes.

6) Do you use an anti-static spray when scissoring? Will this ruin your shears? If you have a favorite product, ie., Groomer's Choice Anti-Static Spray, please list. Jay Scruggs recommends the GC spray.

I use a fine misting water bottle and fill it with water and spritz the area I'm working on once. it takes away any static and it's so fine that the water dries within a minute

7) Do you tend to groom in a certain order? Do you tackle the face first or the feet, or does this once again depend on the individual poodle?
After bathe and dried. First thing I do is nails. Then feet. The sani then clean ears. Then I start at a back leg and work my way to the front doing face last. Unless I know the owner is notorious for showing up early. Then I do the face and head first that way if the owner pops in unannounced I don't have to work on a wiggly face.. Lol

8) How do you keep a longer/fuller topknot from falling (you know what I mean, that icky part they get down the middle after a day or two)? Any tips?

I really am not sure what you mean, but I band my poodles top knot because she is a show dog, I do this every 1-2 days.

9) What's the best way to get a tight line separating bracelet from upper leg in Miami trim, etc.? Do you use a clipper or shear?
I use my clippers to create the lines and then I scissor in the bracelets

10) Do you prefer snap-on combs or scissoring for the finished look? What parts of the poodle do you feel must be scissored (topknot obviously)? Is the #30 blade the best choice when using the combs?

- Favorite snap-on combs: I don't use combs
- Scissoring tips: I always scissor finish everything. I feel the snap on combs are an extra step that take more time. I know scissoring is a talent that not everyone will always accomplish, but for me scissoring is a strong point and I can scissor a full dogs coat faster then I can shave down a coat. Even when I shave a dog down, I scissor finish any sticky outies.

GROOMING TOOL MAINTENANCE:
11) What's the best way to clean your clipper blades? I've heard the spray cleaners are bad, etc.
I use blade cleaners. I never have a problem. I have used water and dawn dish soap, but you must make sure they are 100% dry before puting them back together because blades will rust

12) How often do you sharpen your blades and shears? (After how many grooms...approximately.)
That depends. About every couple of months. It depends on if they get dropped, how many dirty or rough coats did you have to work on, how well were the sharpened... We use to have an amazing sharpener who did such a good job that I didn't have to sharpen my shears for about 6 months or so and that was with every day use




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I am grooming my 5 mo old Spoo myself and she is great for body and feet, but she is terrible for her face. She thrashes around and not only am I unable to do a good job I'm afraid I will hurt her. Does anyone have tips about teaching them about face shaving. I have a oster A5 clipper which is fairly noisy but she's so good about everything else I'm just a loss about her face.
 

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Grooming 101 Groomer's Q & A

1) When drying a poodle with a HV dryer, do you start brushing the coat while it's still wet-wet or damp or ???
I never brush the coat wet.I think it splits the hair, just like our won heads!I brush when the coat is nearly dry with a good Slicker.If it makes noise get rid of it.It's splitting the hair!
 

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I am grooming my 5 mo old Spoo myself and she is great for body and feet, but she is terrible for her face. She thrashes around and not only am I unable to do a good job I'm afraid I will hurt her. Does anyone have tips about teaching them about face shaving. I have a oster A5 clipper which is fairly noisy but she's so good about everything else I'm just a loss about her face.
One thing that helps is keeping the nose almost straight up! It's a position where it's harder for the dog to be a pest and if it wriggles, it'll likely just back down/out instead of pushing against the blade and getting nicked.
 

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Raven's Mom,I always rub their faces when I pet them.Also massage the muzzle & I take the clippers & turn them on & just rub them over the dogs body & faces before I clip.Like a practice run.Clipping the face vibrates the nose & eyes & makes them afraid,I think.It freaks me out to have my electric toothbrush vibrate my nose & eyes too,LOL
 

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I am grooming my 5 mo old Spoo myself and she is great for body and feet, but she is terrible for her face. She thrashes around and not only am I unable to do a good job I'm afraid I will hurt her. Does anyone have tips about teaching them about face shaving. I have a oster A5 clipper which is fairly noisy but she's so good about everything else I'm just a loss about her face.
Another thing is to do a lot of practise when you don't have to worry about a clean face. Key is SHORT sessions (just a touch of vibrating clipper, or a little shaving motion) to keep her hopes up and GOOD effort-payout ratio. Minimize risk as totally as you can! Start from a less sensitive area (lower neck, cheeks), hold the clipper low for maximum control, be very very patient and go for two slight shaves rather than one efficient one. Know where her vibrissal pads are. Avoid the sensitive area (whatever she likes the least) until you can trust her to not thrash about when you approach.

If process feels slow and you need to neaten her nose, you can scissor it to be neater, if moustachioed. Just go slow and very patient. If she's patient and trusting, and your scissors sharp, you'll be able to shorten the moustache down to "shaved" length! This may even help her to better trust you with other (big! noisy! vibrating!) tools near her nose. (Sulo is an example of this working.)

Unless she's traumatized, she should soon figure out that facial grooming sessions usually last only for a tiny little while (longer as she improves), is pretty easy and not much of a bother (more challenging as she improves) and result in good things (praise, special treats, special toy only for this occasion, neck rubsies, roughhouse, whatever she enjoys), and be on a better mood when you take the clipper out.
 

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I love the information on this grooming post, but I do have a question. How do you start introducing a new puppy to grooming in a way that they will grow to be very wonderful for grooming? I want to set my girl up for the success of closer to a show clipped coat but that will require a lot of patience and practice on both ends. I dont want to accidentally make her hate the thought of grooming :(
 

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I am grooming my 5 mo old Spoo myself and she is great for body and feet, but she is terrible for her face. She thrashes around and not only am I unable to do a good job I'm afraid I will hurt her. Does anyone have tips about teaching them about face shaving. I have a oster A5 clipper which is fairly noisy but she's so good about everything else I'm just a loss about her face.


I think most people know this, but worth pointing out- I make sure to start with a fresh cold-to-the-touch blade for faces, sensitive bits and as much as possible the feet. If the blade is slightly warm or hot, my guy gets squirrelly. And the hot blades can burn the skin. If it’s too hot to touch my skin, it’s too hot to touch his. This is where owning multiples of the same blade size comes in very handy.


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What are a few scissors you recommend?

Context:
I am a lefty and have an 8lb leggy toy poodle. I have smaller hands.

I don't want to spend a ton of money, but I want something that I can sharpen. We've been bathing and clipping him ourselves for a year without any scissors at all, and I want to budget in a pair of straight and curved scissors for his topknot etc.

Thanks!! :bathbaby:
 

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Look at the house brand shears at PetEdge.
 

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As in many things, with scissors you will get what you pay for. I have several very high end shears (Chris Christensen) which cost hundreds of dollars each that I use for finish scissoring only and only on clean, blown out coat. This way they keep their edge much longer. Another caveat, I would hesitate to buy any scissors without trying them in your hand for weight/feel. While you can adjust tension on most shears, you still need to be comfortable with how they feel in your hand when you are scissoring. Are there any dog shows near you where there might be vendors who have scissors you could try?

If not, try looking at Dubl Duck Shears. A number of online pet sites sell them. They have several different quality grades. I have Standards but most people use similar size shears to scissor all varieties. That being said, you can get 6.5, 7.5, 8 inch, etc. shears in straight and in some curved. I use the Dubl Duck 88B 8.25 shears on my Standards for roughing and some basic finish scissoring. They are workhorse shears, I have several of them and they all have been sharpened many times over the years (make sure you use a sharpener familiar with grooming shears so they don't overgrind and decrease the life of your shears). I use Whitmans, they do an excellent job. I have left shears (and blades) for them when they have been a vendor at dog shows I was at, but you can mail your shears to them as well.
 
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High Velocity dryer blast the excess water from the coat using no heat but fast (high Velocity) air. Stand dryers or finishing dryers uses lower pressure heated air and they are used after a HV dryer to fluff dry the coat so it is as straight as possible.

There are combination dryer which is a hybrid of the both where you get change the velocity and heat also replace the hose for a pipe.
 

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High Velocity dryer blast the excess water from the coat using no heat but fast (high Velocity) air. Stand dryers or finishing dryers uses lower pressure heated air and they are used after a HV dryer to fluff dry the coat so it is as straight as possible.

There are combination dryer which is a hybrid of the both where you get change the velocity and heat also replace the hose for a pipe.
That's a bot you're so kindly replying to :( Just copying and pasting old comments all over the place, resurrecting old posts. It's really annoying.
 
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