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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So, puppy has been with us less than a week. He is really sweet. But my husband and I keep joking that he's like stepford puppy. He's quiet and calm. Too quiet and calm? I always think of puppies as being rambunctious, but this little guy is like a big sleepy lump LOL. He only seems to like going out to the yard to do his business and then walks right to the door to come inside (don't they want to stay out and play?). He doesn't know how to play .. or doesn't want to play? I throw a ball and he's like "whatever" or he may chase it once and then plop his butt down on the grass. He's not even chewing on his chew toys much though he's clearly teething (lost one tooth yesterday). He's not playing with anything much or he'll "play," meaning pounce on a toy ONCE and then lay down and chill. He's not even into the kong with peanut butter in it.

We're new to him so I don't expect insta-connection, but I'm surprised at how independent he is for a puppy. I mean, he's clearly becoming connected (and he's starting to follow me around especially :) ) but he just wants to go in the same room and then go to sleep. Doesn't come for cuddles/ petting. He's really tame for a puppy, I think.

But he's REALLY well-behaved. I can put on his leash, groom him, tell him to "leave it", he gets "stay" a little bit, etc.

He's really growing on me and I much prefer a well-mannered pup, but I'm wondering if I should be worrying that my puppy is TOO GOOD? LOL. Is there such a thing? Could it be the teething? Is it just the transition? I know the breeder did say more of his play was with his litter mates. My sister's dog was up on the weekend and my pup was totally different with him. He got so excited, tried to play "tag" with the other dog, etc. So maybe he only plays with other dogs? How do I teach him to play with us?

BTW, he came from a reputable breeder and it shows in his manners and his easy-going nature in various settings. He's not afraid of thunder or freak out at things, and he's comfortable around people, relaxed, so he's clearly socialized. Just a little bit "doggie".

Advice?
 

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I just think he's going to be wonderful....he needs some time but when he begins to come out of his shell, he won't be a total nut-case, he'll be well mannered and gentle. Don't push him too. much but just be reassuring and friendly and loving. If he is healthy (no fever, good appetite, normal BM's) then don't fret....he's what we all dream of.
 

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I agree with partial2poodles. My Teddy is the the same way and has been since I first brought him home. He's just a naturally mellow guy and would prefer to be sleeping on the floor next to my chair than running around playing with his toys. He loves to play, mostly with other dogs and my cat, but occasionally he will bring a toy to me to play. If I don't notice, he just drops it on the floor and lays down and takes a nap. No begging, no whining--just exactly what you want a dog to do.

He always wants to be in the same room with me wherever I am, but he doesn't necessary want to be cuddled. But when he does want me to hold him, he lets me know. When I need to put him down to do something else, he doesn't mind that either.

He isn't like this because of anything I did, he came that way and has become more and more laid back as he has gotten older. People are always commenting on how quiet and well-behaved he is, especially in public.

So be thankful you got a mellow one. :)
 

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Its very very early. You are likely worrying too much:) Olie was like this and I know now why my BF chose him. This will not last so take advantage LOL!!
 

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We just picked up our first spoo two weeks ago, and I was wondering the exact same thing about him!! He is super calm and well behaved, (shouldn't he be chewing up all our stuff?) He sits and stays, and on the very rare occasion he has something he shouldn't, tell him to leave it and he does. He doesn't jump all over the kids, and mostly just lays around at our feet. We try to play with him, and he will, for alittle while, and then poops out. He does seem to want to play with our 9 year old toy poodle, but she wont have it. He went to the vet yesterday for his 12week shots ect. and the vet said his was fine, just real laid back. Now that I can relax about it being a health issue, i'm thrilled. Since I have two kids under 5, a super chill pup is a God send=)
 

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See, this is why I don't understand why people with kids would prefer a golden or a lab, or a golden/lab/poodle mix over a pure-bred standard poodle. It's really baffling to me, especially after watching the movie Marley & Me. LOL
 

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See, this is why I don't understand why people with kids would prefer a golden or a lab, or a golden/lab/poodle mix over a pure-bred standard poodle. It's really baffling to me, especially after watching the movie Marley & Me. LOL
I know=)
I'm a poodle convert. When I was 18, and first moved out on my own, my boyfriend (now my husband) convinced me to get a poodle. I wanted a dog, and knew I needed a small dog since I lived in an apartment. I DID NOT WANT A POODLE! I thought they looked weird, and were too....poodlely. But he had a poodle growing up and thought they were the best dogs ever. After researching breeds, I realized that a toy poodle would be right for me, as far as the life style I would be able to provide for it. So Darby entered our lives. Now, 8 years later, we have two kids, a house with a big yard, and an love for camping and hiking. We decided to get a big dog. (we still have Darby, by the way) And again, I researched breeds, and the standard poodle just fit. I really wish people would look beyond what a dog looks like, to what it is bred to do, and the amount of exercise, and mental stimuli it needs. For instance, I love love love border collies! They are so smart and loving and beautiful! But I can't provide one with the type of life it needs to be a well balanced and happy dog. We had one when I was a little girl, five I think. She was a great dog, but needed more than just romps in the back yard. She needed a job to do. She became a habitual fence jumper, and was eventually hit by a car. I remember my dad trying to give her c.p.r. on the way to the pet hospital. It broke all of our hearts. She may have been what we wanted, but we weren't what she needed. And she suffered because of it. I used to work at an animal shelter. Almost every dog that was turned over to us, was for an avoidable reason.
"He sheds too much" get a non or low shedding breed
"He always digs under the fence and gets out, and bays all the time (usually a hound) don't get a hound if you don't like that
"He has way too much energy" don't get a super high energy breed
"He's always nipping at our ankles" don't get a herding dog unless you have a herd
If people would just get dogs whose traits and bred in instincts fit into their life style, there would be far fewer dogs that end up in the pound.
Ok, thats my rant, I'm off my soap box now. Sorry=)
 

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I would say that you got a really low drive Poodle. There is nothing wrong with that. It is a good idea, however, to start retrieving training now so that you have that to fall back on as an exercise tool when the dog is older. Start small. Put puppy in your lap in an inside, distraction free area. Tease puppy with a small toy or ball (small enough that it is easy to pick up). I like to use crumpled paper when the puppies are little because the crumpling sound gets them excited. Get the puppy worked up as much as possible and toss the paper no more than 2 ft in front of the puppy. When the puppy goes out after it, make a big deal about it. PARTY PARTY PARTY! Hopefully the puppy will pick it up. Call puppy back with HAPPY HAPPY HAPPY sounds. Eventually the puppy will learn that it pleases you when it does this sort of work for you. You can increase distance when the puppy is successful at shorter distances.


RE outside time.... Poodles do not want to be "outside". The want to be with you all the time. They are typically not pushy about affection. They are content to bask in the glow of their owner.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the tips. I just realized that he likes shiny, crinkly tosy this morning when he started playing with one of the cat toys LOL. Yes, I'm working him up to being interested in the ball little by little. We went for a good walk this morning, with a few short bursts thrown in and, boy, am I falling in love with this little guy. At one point he got very excited (the most I've seen out of him) when we started running fast and he just sprinted ahead blowing in the wind - then he looked back at me, could tell I couldn't keep up (and the leash would run out soon LOL) and he slowed down and waited. So smart!

When I first thought of getting a dog a few months ago, I initially poo-pooed the poodle breed as well. Not from knowing anything about them, but from the cultural stereotypes of them. My husband told a friend of his he got a poodle and the guy immediately started making fun of him and being like "what are you? gay?" It's the weirdest thing the reaction of people that know nothing about them. On the other hand, anyone that's familiar with them or had them before immediately lights up and says they are the best.

I'm soooooo glad that I'm the kind of person that questions my own ASSumptions and didn't go with my initial "I couldn't get a froo-froo poddle dog". And, btw, they are NOT funny looking. They are gorgeous. It's the show hairstyle that turns many people off. I honestly didn't even realize it was a haircut ... I thought that's how their coat naturally grew LOL *embarrased face*
 

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That friend of your husband's, he's exactly the kind of guy who would get a "manly" dog, not bother training it or giving it enough attention and then take it the shelter after the dog dug up the yard/ate the sofa/devoured the kitchen table, etc., etc., because he couldn't control the dog. What a loser.

(and yes, I'm making a snap judgment about someone I don't know, but it irritates me when people say things like that, implying that there's something wrong with being gay)

/steps off soapbox
 

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That friend of your husband's, he's exactly the kind of guy who would get a "manly" dog, not bother training it or giving it enough attention and then take it the shelter after the dog dug up the yard/ate the sofa/devoured the kitchen table, etc., etc., because he couldn't control the dog. What a loser.

(and yes, I'm making a snap judgment about someone I don't know, but it irritates me when people say things like that, implying that there's something wrong with being gay)

/steps off soapbox
No offense to Jazztoon - I agree with Marion that guy wasn't just sterio typing poodles.....But I also know some people dont know any better and were raised to say and act this way it DOES NOT make it OK - but yep there is a misconception for "some" about poodles.

I love taking mine to the dog park and watch the expressions on peoples faces especially men, their mouths hanging open watching my two jumping 9 feet in mid air and landing soft like a leopard lol!!

They look at their big manly dog they raised laying on the ground watching, come over to me and ask what kind of dog, I say poodle and they laugh, shaking their head and say they had NO IDEA what an athletic dog they were. I smile turn and walk on!! LMAO!!
 

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My husband was one of those who "thought" he wouldn't like a poodle because they are too frou-frou... guess who is a total poodle convert? :nod:

It just melts my heart to seem my manly husband craddling the mini poodle and loving on him.
 

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My family has been joking that I attract dogs whose breeds are stereotyped that totally bust those. I have a pit bull who is the sweetest dog to people and other dogs and loves going to doggie daycare, a corgi/chihuahua mix (well, he is both my mom's and mine since he loves all of our dogs) that neither yips nor nips and a Catahoula that is more concerned with her spot on the bed than being a hellion.
And now I'm adding a Poodle who is going to work at least as hard as the "typical" service dog breeds and probably harder!
Just imagine the looks I will get when I'm walking everyone beside the wheelchair:rofl:
 
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