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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Sisko and I have have gotten better! My mood has improved, so I don't get angry at all anymore. Sisko either has to lay down or stay in one part of the kitchen, we've been working on impulse control and attention, and heeling.??

I noticed Sisko would scratch, stretch, yawn, lick his lips and groom himself, when, I asked him to do something, didn't want to do something, like get off the bed, and when he wanted my attention, so I looked into why he would do this and found out that these are called displacement behaviors, so I asked on a wedsite what I should about it and the person on the website said to ignore it and walk away and said to start making Sisko work for his food, and I make him work for attention too. He's still doing the behaviors, but less so, and is more willing to listen to me.

He can still be hard to train because he won't take things seriously and likes to goof off and try to play instead listening. He also gives up very easily when trying to find treats or getting his food from his bowl.

1/4/2020
Sisko is getting even better! He ignored 2 really cute older Golden Retrievers and their owners walking on the other side of the road.
 

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Sounds to me as if you have communication problems - if your dog is not doing as you ask it is because he does not understand what you want, and/or you have not built up a solid history of it being really rewarding to do so. Have you been to any training classes? I think you may find them very helpful. If that is not possible I recommend Jean Donaldson's "Train your dog like a pro" and Kikopup's many training videos, available online. Getting angry and frustrated will just confuse him more - make training into a fun game that you both enjoy, be absolutely consistent about rewarding what you like and ignoring what you don't, understand how to train according to the three Ds (Distance, Duration and Distraction), and remember that your dog is being "trained" every minute of every day by everything around him, not just when you set up a formal session.

If you want to understand how it feels to be a dog there is a game you could play with your mother - she asks you to do something, like sit down or walk across the room, but she can only use the names of fruits, and cannot act it out for you. You have to work out what it is she wants, just as a dog must.
 

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I agree with fjm in many ways. Your dog is confused and frustrated by his inconsistent experiences in the time you were unable to do formal training. Remember also that while you were ill he was languishing with little sense of his place in the world. I was sick during the week after Thanksgiving and that one week off from training has left Javelin feeling sort of lost and a bit aimless. We will get through this together because I need him to do so and I understand that he has some unspent energy. I cannot possibly think about being angry, but rather know I need more patience with him just now.

You need to be patient and go back to basics either in a good positive based class or using good YouTube videos that will help you work through things slowly and in ways that will rebuild your bond so that your dog isn't just a couch buddy but a dog who respects that you have his back.
 

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Sounds to me as if you have communication problems - if your dog is not doing as you ask it is because he does not understand what you want, and/or you have not built up a solid history of it being really rewarding to do so. Have you been to any training classes? I think you may find them very helpful. If that is not possible I recommend Jean Donaldson's "Train your dog like a pro" and Kikopup's many training videos, available online. Getting angry and frustrated will just confuse him more - make training into a fun game that you both enjoy, be absolutely consistent about rewarding what you like and ignoring what you don't, understand how to train according to the three Ds (Distance, Duration and Distraction), and remember that your dog is being "trained" every minute of every day by everything around him, not just when you set up a formal session.

If you want to understand how it feels to be a dog there is a game you could play with your mother - she asks you to do something, like sit down or walk across the room, but she can only use the names of fruits, and cannot act it out for you. You have to work out what it is she wants, just as a dog must.
Such a cool game to help understand the dog's point of view!

Sent from my STV100-3 using Tapatalk
 

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Fenris - how much exercise does your dog get? I've discovered lately that if I want nice well behaved non-pulling walking, I need to let my dog run and burn off some energy first. Do you have a park nearby? If so, I'd suggest trying a long line (mine is homemade, 50' long, and cost less than $20) to let him burn off some energy, maybe play some fetch or wrestle with a favourite toy, and then try working on good leash behaviour.

For staying out of the kitchen - try teaching an alternate behaviour that you DO want him to do. I taught Annie this accidentally while I was working on "stay". I worked on "stay" in a particular spot while I am in the kitchen making food, etc (in the hallway right outside the kitchen door). Every 5-10s, I threw a little bit of food. If she stands up to come in, I gently led her back to her spot, and told her "down! stay!). Then gradually fade to every 30s - 1 min, etc. If I am in the kitchen, Annie now lies in her "food acquiring spot" even when I don't tell her to.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sounds to me as if you have communication problems - if your dog is not doing as you ask it is because he does not understand what you want, and/or you have not built up a solid history of it being really rewarding to do so. Have you been to any training classes? I think you may find them very helpful. If that is not possible I recommend Jean Donaldson's "Train your dog like a pro" and Kikopup's many training videos, available online. Getting angry and frustrated will just confuse him more - make training into a fun game that you both enjoy, be absolutely consistent about rewarding what you like and ignoring what you don't, understand how to train according to the three Ds (Distance, Duration and Distraction), and remember that your dog is being "trained" every minute of every day by everything around him, not just when you set up a formal session.

If you want to understand how it feels to be a dog there is a game you could play with your mother - she asks you to do something, like sit down or walk across the room, but she can only use the names of fruits, and cannot act it out for you. You have to work out what it is she wants, just as a dog must.
Okay, thank you, very much. We went to training classes, but my mom and I decided to stop taking him because he couldn’t calm down, and we’re thinking about private classes. I just found Jean Donaldson’s book on Amazon and I’ll look at Kikopup’s videos. Okay, I will.

Whoa! Okay.
 

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Okay, thank you, very much. We went to training classes, but my mom and I decided to stop taking him because he couldn’t calm down, and we’re thinking about private classes. I just found Jean Donaldson’s book on Amazon and I’ll look at Kikopup’s videos. Okay, I will.

Whoa! Okay.
If your dog can't learn to keep calm for classes, I would start there. He needs to learn to calm himself and control impulses. Impulse control is going to be central to all other training. A dog without impulse control is unable to perform a lot of commands, not because he doesn't understand them, but because he cannot control his impulses. So for example with the kitchen, your dog may understand that you want him out of the kitchen, but he cannot control his impulse to be with you or with the good smells. I think that working on getting him into classes is exactly what he needs. If you have a good trainer they should work with you. Position your dog further away from other class mates if you need to. Work on settling behavior and attention on you games. The trainer should have good tips. I think you will find that the more you work on these basic things, the more you will find improvements in everything. That's why you feel like a failure. You're trying to run before you walk.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I agree with fjm in many ways. Your dog is confused and frustrated by his inconsistent experiences in the time you were unable to do formal training. Remember also that while you were ill he was languishing with little sense of his place in the world. I was sick during the week after Thanksgiving and that one week off from training has left Javelin feeling sort of lost and a bit aimless. We will get through this together because I need him to do so and I understand that he has some unspent energy. I cannot possibly think about being angry, but rather know I need more patience with him just now.

You need to be patient and go back to basics either in a good positive based class or using good YouTube videos that will help you work through things slowly and in ways that will rebuild your bond so that your dog isn't just a couch buddy but a dog who respects that you have his back.
Okay, thank you very much. That couldn’t have felt good at all for him. Okay,
I agree with fjm in many ways. Your dog is confused and frustrated by his inconsistent experiences in the time you were unable to do formal training. Remember also that while you were ill he was languishing with little sense of his place in the world. I was sick during the week after Thanksgiving and that one week off from training has left Javelin feeling sort of lost and a bit aimless. We will get through this together because I need him to do so and I understand that he has some unspent energy. I cannot possibly think about being angry, but rather know I need more patience with him just now.

You need to be patient and go back to basics either in a good positive based class or using good YouTube videos that will help you work through things slowly and in ways that will rebuild your bond so that your dog isn't just a couch buddy but a dog who respects that you have his back.
Okay, thank you very much. That had To be difficult for him. Okay, I starting to get patience back again. I’m looking into kikopup’s videos. Thank you again.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Fenris - how much exercise does your dog get? I've discovered lately that if I want nice well behaved non-pulling walking, I need to let my dog run and burn off some energy first. Do you have a park nearby? If so, I'd suggest trying a long line (mine is homemade, 50' long, and cost less than $20) to let him burn off some energy, maybe play some fetch or wrestle with a favourite toy, and then try working on good leash behaviour.

For staying out of the kitchen - try teaching an alternate behaviour that you DO want him to do. I taught Annie this accidentally while I was working on "stay". I worked on "stay" in a particular spot while I am in the kitchen making food, etc (in the hallway right outside the kitchen door). Every 5-10s, I threw a little bit of food. If she stands up to come in, I gently led her back to her spot, and told her "down! stay!). Then gradually fade to every 30s - 1 min, etc. If I am in the kitchen, Annie now lies in her "food acquiring spot" even when I don't tell her to.
I have a park that we can walk to and a dog park that’s close but not walking distance. I started to walk Sisko around the block 3 to 4 times a day, but it’s been pretty wet lately so we’ve been playing inside until he gets tired. I have a long lead that’s 30’ long. May I ask how you made yours please? He used to run and play with his rope toy outside on his long lead but he likes to sniff around more now. Do you think I should try to get him more interested in playing outside again?

Okay, I’m working on him laying outside the kitchen and staying there. I’ll try it! Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If your dog can't learn to keep calm for classes, I would start there. He needs to learn to calm himself and control impulses. Impulse control is going to be central to all other training. A dog without impulse control is unable to perform a lot of commands, not because he doesn't understand them, but because he cannot control his impulses. So for example with the kitchen, your dog may understand that you want him out of the kitchen, but he cannot control his impulse to be with you or with the good smells. I think that working on getting him into classes is exactly what he needs. If you have a good trainer they should work with you. Position your dog further away from other class mates if you need to. Work on settling behavior and attention on you games. The trainer should have good tips. I think you will find that the more you work on these basic things, the more you will find improvements in everything. That's why you feel like a failure. You're trying to run before you walk.
Ah, okay thank you. Start back at baby steps again ? yep, when I first got him we were walking, but since I got better I tried running and fell? not a good idea. I’m looking at kikipup’s videos and I will ask my trainer about help for impulse control.
 

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I have a park that we can walk to and a dog park that’s close but not walking distance. I started to walk Sisko around the block 3 to 4 times a day, but it’s been pretty wet lately so we’ve been playing inside until he gets tired. I have a long lead that’s 30’ long. May I ask how you made yours please? He used to run and play with his rope toy outside on his long lead but he likes to sniff around more now. Do you think I should try to get him more interested in playing outside again?

Okay, I’m working on him laying outside the kitchen and staying there. I’ll try it! Thank you.
I bought a 50' rope and two clips (like the kind at the end of a leash) from a hardware store. I tied the rope with one clip on each end using bowline knots (google it). I attached one end to my dog, and the other end I can wrap around my waist. I measured loosely around my waist on my end, and tied two figure eight knots as "stopper knots", and clip my end in between the two knots so it doesn't loosen/tighten around my waist. Took me all of 10 min to make ;)

As for playing - sniffing is good brain exercise. But high speed playing is imporant too. I've had a lot of success recently becoming more interesting to my dog with toys outside. I had thought she'd never learn fetch, and then I watched some of Bill Hillmann's videos on training labrador retrievers. He teaches them from puppyhood that "the game" is the most awesome thing ever and uses it to motivate his dogs. I'm not training a field trial retriever, and I don't follow a lot of what he does but his videos really helped me figure out how to use toys as motivation, and get her excited about playing with me outside.They are pretty long and a bit disjointed though . I can't find the one I used, but here's one of his videos
 

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For his lack of focus and calm, I highly recommend this video from Puppy Culture. It's all about teaching your dog to focus on you in the face of distractions. Once you have mastered it at home you would do it in places of increasing difficulty- a quiet park, a busier park, outside a store, and eventually at training classes!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I bought a 50' rope and two clips (like the kind at the end of a leash) from a hardware store. I tied the rope with one clip on each end using bowline knots (google it). I attached one end to my dog, and the other end I can wrap around my waist. I measured loosely around my waist on my end, and tied two figure eight knots as "stopper knots", and clip my end in between the two knots so it doesn't loosen/tighten around my waist. Took me all of 10 min to make ;)

As for playing - sniffing is good brain exercise. But high speed playing is imporant too. I've had a lot of success recently becoming more interesting to my dog with toys outside. I had thought she'd never learn fetch, and then I watched some of Bill Hillmann's videos on training labrador retrievers. He teaches them from puppyhood that "the game" is the most awesome thing ever and uses it to motivate his dogs. I'm not training a field trial retriever, and I don't follow a lot of what he does but his videos really helped me figure out how to use toys as motivation, and get her excited about playing with me outside.They are pretty long and a bit disjointed though . I can't find the one I used, but here's one of his videos
For his lack of focus and calm, I highly recommend this video from Puppy Culture. It's all about teaching your dog to focus on you in the face of distractions. Once you have mastered it at home you would do it in places of increasing difficulty- a quiet park, a busier park, outside a store, and eventually at training classes!
Okay, thank you very much! I’m going to be looking at this and more today.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I bought a 50' rope and two clips (like the kind at the end of a leash) from a hardware store. I tied the rope with one clip on each end using bowline knots (google it). I attached one end to my dog, and the other end I can wrap around my waist. I measured loosely around my waist on my end, and tied two figure eight knots as "stopper knots", and clip my end in between the two knots so it doesn't loosen/tighten around my waist. Took me all of 10 min to make ;)

As for playing - sniffing is good brain exercise. But high speed playing is imporant too. I've had a lot of success recently becoming more interesting to my dog with toys outside. I had thought she'd never learn fetch, and then I watched some of Bill Hillmann's videos on training labrador retrievers. He teaches them from puppyhood that "the game" is the most awesome thing ever and uses it to motivate his dogs. I'm not training a field trial retriever, and I don't follow a lot of what he does but his videos really helped me figure out how to use toys as motivation, and get her excited about playing with me outside.They are pretty long and a bit disjointed though . I can't find the one I used, but here's one of his videos
Okay, that’s awesome! There’s a Ace Hardware that I can walk to, so I’ll check to see if the have it. There’s no chance of Sisko going warp poodle speed and taking me with him is there? He’s taken me away before while he had his lead on outside? I’ve played the sniffing game with him before, but I need to do it more. Sometimes I toss a treat up in the air and he finds where it lands. There was one time where I used a blueberry and we both couldn’t find it, but then he found it a week or 2 later, I didn’t let him eat it though.?

Yeah, it is very important. Thank you, very much for the video! I just remembered that I have to have a sense of humor with this too. We’re both doing a little better today?
 

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Brain games take off at least as much energy as running like a loon. You can teach tricks which are great to have on hand when the weather stinks and you can't get ou with your dog. Also thinking about it more I also would try a flirt pole. You can be pretty still while your dog gets lots of energy scrubbed out. A flirt pole is also actually a good tool for teaching impulse control. Play play play, give it, sit down sit, play play play.........
 
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Brain games take off at least as much energy as running like a loon. You can teach tricks which are great to have on hand when the weather stinks and you can't get ou with your dog. Also thinking about it more I also would try a flirt pole. You can be pretty still while your dog gets lots of energy scrubbed out. A flirt pole is also actually a good tool for teaching impulse control. Play play play, give it, sit down sit, play play play.........
Okay(y) thank you. I’ll see if Mudbay has any flirt poles tomorrow?
 

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Okay(y) thank you. I’ll see if Mudbay has any flirt poles tomorrow?
One thing that works for me, is rather than blaming Buck, I blame myself for owner/trainer error. I started with housebreaking. It was me who missed the cues, didn’t anticipate the schedule. It’s me who needs to figure out how to get a desired behavior or command and keep working patiently, lovingly and with a sense of humor. If you can find a good private trainer, emphasis on good, so there are no further setbacks, book a few classes. They will give you confidence, along with PF and the training resources already mentioned. Also, you have time. Poodles are slow to mature, but retain that joie de vivre, longer than other breeds. Could not have survived without a flirt pole:)
 
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