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Discussion Starter #1
I have my mini penny. She has seperation anxiety from me and she also shows signs of possesiveness of me. I wanted to get another dog one that could protect me more when my fiance goes to boot camp and a companion for penny when I have to go to work. Now with penny like this is it a good idea or not? And any suggestions on a breed that could be suitable for these roles. I can totally afford another and have time for it. I work 3 nights out of the week. Advice please? Oh also I want to rescue the addition so anything I need to look out for. I have had more than one dog but nothing unique like penny penelope.
 

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Before adding a dog to the home, you need to address Penny's behavioural problems. Possessiveness is not something you should ignore. Implement NILIF (nothing in life is free) which means she has to work for everything. For example, sit before she gets fed, sit before she goes out, sit before she comes in, sit before she gets on your lap, sit before she gets on furniture, etc.
Adding another dog will likely only escalate her possessiveness problems.
I would not recommend getting a puppy. I think an adult dog that is calm and confident would be your best bet. Is Penny a dominant or submissive dog?

As for breeds, it depends what you are looking for in a dog. If you're going to rescue, you can probably find a dog that matches just what you are looking for.
It might help to list a few things like:
What size do you want?
How much exercise can you provide?
How much shedding/grooming?
 

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Good advice Locket! Never get another dog until the one you have is balanced and totally trained...unless maybe if you are a professional trainer...IMO-
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Penny does all the things you say. She is well behaved. She is getting better with seperation anxiety and her possesiveness/jealosy is on the increase however. Penny is submissive. She is shy timid around other animals and humans.

The dog I want to have exercise level is medium, and no bigger than a lab. Grooming isn't a problem either. I just want a play buddy for penny and protector. I did want to rescue a pitt. But they told me that because there so strong that they could hurt penny when they play. So I'm trying to avoid that.
 

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Not only are they strong but they have the lock jaw, so if by cahce the pitt ever bit Penne, you wouldn't be able to release them in the same way, if that makes sense. Somebody else will be able to explain it better. Personally I would never trust a pitt, but I have had a recent bad experience.

I always like to see two dogs together of the same breed. Classy looking pair, and you know what is required care wise when you head into it. Why not another mini poodle? Two dogs barking at the door would be intimidating for any stranger:)
 

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Not only are they strong but they have the lock jaw, so if by cahce the pitt ever bit Penne, you wouldn't be able to release them in the same way, if that makes sense. Somebody else will be able to explain it better. Personally I would never trust a pitt, but I have had a recent bad experience.

I always like to see two dogs together of the same breed. Classy looking pair, and you know what is required care wise when you head into it. Why not another mini poodle? Two dogs barking at the door would be intimidating for any stranger:)
Lol, so true.
My grandparents once had students break in to their property in the early hours of the morning, to get into their house. But their Miniature Poodles woke up, ran outside barking like crazy at the intruders. Later on, the students told the police that my grandfather sit his ferocious dogs on him, the police asked him what type of dog they were, and he showed them two tiny wee Miniature Poodles. So yes, two can be intimidating. But you do need to address her issues. It sounds as though she is confused about where she is. You need to implement basic things into your lifestyle, like ignoring her when you come home, and when she asks for attention etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Jak how do you mean confused? And I do ignore her when I enter until she sits. I read that poodles connect with one person. This is true. I had her for two days until I had to leave for work. And she was with my fiance. When I returned she knew me right away and wouldn't leave my side. My fiance was nobody when I was in the picture. We have been to obediance classess and she is well behaved otherwise and has very good manners. So I don't know. I want a dog that's a little larger than her though but I shall think of another mini. It isn't a bad idea. I wish I got her brother when he was available. They would have been quite a beutiful pair.
 

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Jak how do you mean confused? And I do ignore her when I enter until she sits. I read that poodles connect with one person. This is true. I had her for two days until I had to leave for work. And she was with my fiance. When I returned she knew me right away and wouldn't leave my side. My fiance was nobody when I was in the picture. We have been to obediance classess and she is well behaved otherwise and has very good manners. So I don't know. I want a dog that's a little larger than her though but I shall think of another mini. It isn't a bad idea. I wish I got her brother when he was available. They would have been quite a beutiful pair.
Like when you are basically re united with her after any separation, you should ignore her until she goes off and lies down. After she has been lying down for 4-5 minutes then you call her to you, just reinforcing you are the boss (ie pecking order). If she gets all hypo, just ignore her, you give her attention on your terms. Also I would suggest when feeding her, pretend to eat from her bowl, get everyone to do it, have a cracker or something, and do that. Just basic things, like when playing tug, never let her get the toy unless you throw it. Stop playing when you want, not when she wants. You go through doors etc. first, in front of her. Just get her to submit often by making her go on her back, or lie under your feet.

I would totally recommend getting "The Dog Listener" by Jan Fennell
The process is called Amichien bonding, works so well, and it just becomes your normal day life.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
She already does that all ready. She knows who's boss and that's me. I try to rack my brain around my little girl. I love her to death and I want another dog but I definetly don't want to ruin the bond I like it but I don't want her to be alone at night by herself. Oh gosh I'm talking as if she needs a nanny for my child. Lol.

But like I said she is well mannard, obediant, and she knows who's boss but maybe she thinks she 2nd in rank and not my fiance? Hmmm. She's also been going to her bed by herself. She's never done that and I've never made her. I always let her sleep on the bed but she tuks me in jumps off and goes into her bed. Can you tell I'm missing her being at work?
 

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Not only are they strong but they have the lock jaw, so if by cahce the pitt ever bit Penne, you wouldn't be able to release them in the same way, if that makes sense. Somebody else will be able to explain it better. Personally I would never trust a pitt, but I have had a recent bad experience.
Lock jaw is a myth! Pits DO NOT have lock jaw, there is no such thing as "lock jaw" aside from the lock jaw experienced with tetanus infection. Pits are AMAZING dogs, just not for everyone! They have powerful jaws, but what 40+ lbs. dog doesn't?



To Katey:
If she is shy and scared around other dogs, why do you think she'd like a playmate? Until she is comfortable around other dogs, I doubt she will take kindly to a new dog entering the picture. It could reinforce her fear of dogs if the new dogs is over exuberant or rushes to meet her. Fearful dogs take lots of patience and sssslllooowww acclimation to new environments and experiences.

Can you explain her possessive behaviours?
 

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if your set on another dog why not a standard poodle.
I have Mandy and Casey and though Mandy is only 30 lbs they play wrestleand have the best of time.
Let her pick perhaps I know my parents dog is not dog social at all yet there is one dog he just loves to play with so perhaps it is the breeds she has met she doesn't like.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Her possessive behaviors include barking, growling but no snarling, and snipping when I'm petting another dog or when my fiance is all over me before she gets to say hi to me. It seems
 

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if your set on another dog why not a standard poodle.
I have Mandy and Casey and though Mandy is only 30 lbs they play wrestleand have the best of time.
Let her pick perhaps I know my parents dog is not dog social at all yet there is one dog he just loves to play with so perhaps it is the breeds she has met she doesn't like.
She seems to not like another mini poodle of the same family. But the poodle I speak of was very dominAnt and wouldn't let penny eat. I had to eventually seperate and hand feed penny otherwise she wouldn't eat. I wouldn't feed her all of the food but enough where she felt safe that she could eat out of the bowl.
 

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Sounds jealous of you...like my Levi gets jealous when my husband hugs me...Levi tries to jump between us as if to protect (or own) me...we firmly tell him "off" and just keep hugging until he stays down...so we never let him win with ownership....and he is getting better. As far as getting another dog, just remember that the dogs form that animal type of bond and want to run, fight, and bark at each other-it is not the same as just having the one that bonds to you-and then you have to train the 2nd one which may create more jealousy as they have to be separated to train them-ie, one crying in the crate while you are working with the other.
 

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If you are a military family do not get a pit. Nothing would be sadder than having to give it up because they are not allowed on base. And with the military you never know when you may have no other choice but base housing. The number of postings of military families looking for a good home for their family dogs is heartbreaking.

Any medium to large dog can be intimidating when protecting it's pack. I once had a gentle love-everybody Aussie back my son-in-law into a corner when he came into the house unannounced late one night (I had given him a key and knew he was coming). Not until I pulled him back and calmed him down did he realize it was one of his favorite visitors. I realized then that even a very mellow dog was good enough protection for me.
 

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Thank you Locket! The lockjaw thing is total BS and I can't believe there are people who still believe it! There have even been studies showing that other breeds including GSDs and Rotts have much more jaw power. (It's interesting to look at the head structure of those three breeds, when you have that info.) Pits are terriers and all terriers are tenacious. Dudley (schnauzer mix) can win a game of tug of war any day and he's 14. Harley (Rottweiler) would rather let you win so he just have his toy.

The only good reason to get any dog is b/c you truly want one, not b/c your current dog needs a buddy or you want a cheap security system. Little dogs are actually more likely to bark and give warning, if that what's your after. My Rottweiler never barks in the house. I you just want an intimidating dog, keep in mind that most "guarding breeds" require tons of work and it's not easy finding a good breeder. You'll be limited in breed choice too b/c Breed Specific Legislation is really catching on w/ the military. I know pits are out and Rotties are close, GSDs and Dobes won't be far behind. You also need to keep in mind how much harder traveling and relocating will be w/ a second dog, especially a large one.


If you're interested in rescue, why not seek out a med/large black mixed breed. Not only are people afraid of black dogs (they've done surveys on this), but they have more trouble getting adopted (there are surveys on that too). I do agree that your Poodle needs some work before bringing home a second dog. Her bad habits could easily spread to the new dog. They may not be a big deal in a Mini, but they will be in larger dog.
 

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Thank you Locket! The lockjaw thing is total BS and I can't believe there are people who still believe it! There have even been studies showing that other breeds including GSDs and Rotts have much more jaw power. (It's interesting to look at the head structure of those three breeds, when you have that info.) Pits are terriers and all terriers are tenacious. Dudley (schnauzer mix) can win a game of tug of war any day and he's 14. Harley (Rottweiler) would rather let you win so he just have his toy.

The only good reason to get any dog is b/c you truly want one, not b/c your current dog needs a buddy or you want a cheap security system. Little dogs are actually more likely to bark and give warning, if that what's your after. My Rottweiler never barks in the house. I you just want an intimidating dog, keep in mind that most "guarding breeds" require tons of work and it's not easy finding a good breeder. You'll be limited in breed choice too b/c Breed Specific Legislation is really catching on w/ the military. I know pits are out and Rotties are close, GSDs and Dobes won't be far behind. You also need to keep in mind how much harder traveling and relocating will be w/ a second dog, especially a large one.


If you're interested in rescue, why not seek out a med/large black mixed breed. Not only are people afraid of black dogs (they've done surveys on this), but they have more trouble getting adopted (there are surveys on that too). I do agree that your Poodle needs some work before bringing home a second dog. Her bad habits could easily spread to the new dog. They may not be a big deal in a Mini, but they will be in larger dog.
Great advice Harley!
 

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Well, yeah dogs do display what we as humans call "jealousy" but is really more ownership over something. When Harry tries that with Mia, I will make this "eh eh" noise and make him sit if he won't listen but most of the time that's enough. Give them an inch and they will take a mile and you have to just be firm and know what you want them to do.

I agree with Harley, a mix breed that is in a rescue that can evaluate temperaments is a good choice. I think that there are so many that won't be considered for one reason or another and it would be nice to offer a home to one of those.
 
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