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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey!

I am currently looking to get a small miniature red poodle and in my search found Calisa poodles, which have been mentioned on these forums a few times and seems pretty reputable. Talked to the breeder and she seems lovely and I feel like its a great fit/she breeds exactly what I'm looking for, however her pups only go home when they're a bit older, about 6 months old. Next time I talk to her I'm going to ask her about what type of socialization / experiences her dogs go through in the 6 months, but I feel like by getting a puppy at 6 months I might be missing out on a lot and there's the potential that the dog wouldn't adjust the best to me and my lifestyle since I'm missing out of the big socialization phase in the puppies life. The big pro I see would be as me being a first time dog owner they wouldn't make the mistakes I'd make, and less sleepless nights (tho imo all the hardship is part of the bonding, fun and experience of having a puppy).

But curious what others especially those who've gotten an older puppy think about think about this.

Also my apologies if this is in the wrong section
 

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I got my boy at 4 months. I appreciated that he was old enough that his personality was very clear when I picked him. I actually was there to see his brother, but was able to recognize that he was more of a rascal than I wanted to deal with. Unfortunately the breeder didn't seem to have exposed them to much (surprise litter in the middle of a home reno), but he came to me sleeping through the night and with very good manners. No nipping, no jumping, and well on his way to housebroken. I wouldn't hesitate to get an older puppy again, but I would ask a lot more questions if the opportunity arose. I really appreciated the extra sleep and not having to deal with any landshark behavior. The longer time with mom can result in better dog manners, better bite inhibition, and a good breeder isn't going to let the pup develop habits that they wouldn't want to live with.

I would go for it, provided the breeder has made efforts to socialize their pups as broadly as you would and everything else clears muster.
 

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Tyler
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I got my Tyler in December at 5.5 months, and consider myself the luckiest poodle puppy mom in the world! He lived with other poodles, and he was obviously socialized with other poodles and people. That one-on-one training we get with really young puppies was limited, but Ty is picking up on what we're training really quickly. He's excellent at just chilling, something I know he learned from his breeder and the other dogs he lived with. Did I mention he sleeps as I brush him? He was ex-pen trained, so crate training was pretty much a done deal when he got here. And potty training has been a breeze - the few accidents we had were all my fault.

I feel like I hit the jackpot on the miniature poodle puppy lottery. Yes, he's a little behind training-wise where he would have been had he been with me since 10 weeks, but the great foundation is there thanks to his excellent breeder so I'm getting the best of both worlds!

IMO you won't be missing a thing by getting an older puppy. If everything else about the breeder checks the boxes, I say go for it.

p.s. I've had poodles since 1997 - puppies and a 4 yr old rescue. This pupster is the easiest ever - but 98% of that is the breeder.
 

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I got Basil, spoo, at 8 weeks, but I were you then I would just pull the trigger if you want to take the leap into poodle parent life.

I wouldn't get too analytical with the pros and cons if I were you... your still going to have thousands of precious puppy pictures on your phone.

There's still a tremendous amount of puppy at 24 weeks. It's going to be fun.

I think the big pro is that around 6 months their their bladder really matures physically. Like, they can hold it for 3-4 hours. As a new parent, you will still have to learn their bladder... and be in sync to their potty schedule. But, you will have a little more grace there.

I'm in the "yes" group if your feeling good about everything else about this breeder if peer pressure has any value ;)
 

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Elroy: Standard Poodle 02/20/21
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I got Elroy (Standard Poodle) at 8 weeks. He's my 1st dog ever. He's now 10½ months old. I'm so glad I got to see him grow up from only 10 lbs to his current 59 lbs. I'm glad, and proud, I got to train him from A to Z myself! Quite a commitment of time, effort, and a bit less sleeping time for me, but it was all worth it. I must note though, I just retired so I have all the time in the world for him! If it's your first dog, there's a lot of good experiences from 2 to 6 months you'll be missing out on. If you've had puppies before, you may have no need to go through the hard work part again. Only you can decide!
 

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Leo (GSD), Lily (APBT), and Simon (SPoo)
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Give me an older puppy any day of the week..... Simon was my first baby puppy in twenty years. I could have done without the middle of the night potty trips.
 

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I'd say 6 months old is very unusual to hold a pup before sending them to their new family.

That said, my miniature girls came from a breeder at almost 2y old. She was changing her breeding program and wanted to find a good home for them. Yes, we missed the puppy phase, but so far as our bond, there was nothing missing. We had 14 loving years together.
 

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Nano, 3 year old toy poodle
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My first dog(belongs to my ex but we raised him together) arrived to us as a small puppy. It was tough and we made some mistakes with socialising him because of our lack of experience. Then again he is a Puli mix(we didn’t know at the time) which is not a breed for first time owners. We did our best and he’s a great dog, but it took a longer time to get there.

Because of this experience I was more then happy to get Nano at 10+ months. He is a failed show prospect and was handled a lot. So grooming and house manner were great, just a few potty accidents here and there in the first few weeks, nothing since. He was great with all kinds of people but was shy of bigger dogs. He had no trick or obedience training which was a bonus for me since I got to teach him everything. And he was not walked much in city/suburbs, so that needed some work.

The first month was hard for him. Because of the shock of leaving his home he was afraid of everything and wouldn’t play. But after that month he switched and was a different dog, playful and interested. I think that part would have been easier if he was younger.

I was patient and took it slow and he got used to my lifestyle just fine, I take him everywhere now. We also went to a bunch of obedience and socialization classes and I did lots of trick training. This built the relationship and his confidence.

I don’t think I’m going to get a small puppy again, they’re cute and it’s fun to watch them grow but so much work. Semi adult dogs are a enough work as is. Also with an older puppy you have a better idea of their energy level and temperament.

If you like this breeder, then I would take that puppy in a heartbeat.
 

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My most recent pup was about 5- 6 months when I got him, he is a standard poodle rescue. He has been the easiest puppy I have had. HIs bladder was stronger so after a week he understood he was suppose to potty outside, He had no socialization prior, he loves everyone. He is a little timid with strange noises but I am hopeful to work through it. He was doing real well with loud noises until New Years Eve when my neighbors were setting off rockets all day n night. I would gladly take a 6 month old anytime.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all the replies. While I'd love to see a puppy grow up from as soon as I can, probably a bit smarter especially due to specific size I'm looking for (looking to fly with my pup) to sacrifice those 4 months for a better 15 years.

And for the curious asked her more in detail as why she keeps them for so long and its mostly to let them go altered and just in general seem like the breeder is a bit skittish to see her pups go to anything but a household where the pup will stay at home, will be talking to her again in the future as our conversation got interrupted, but me living in a city and walking on the streets and going to parks (though even I'm a bit hesitant and will probably avoid anything but small dog /empty dog parks) and me wanting to socialize / do group puppy classes seemed to be dealbreakers for her. Which is I think is her right as a breeder, but glad I followed though and asked more questions and will be continuing my search for the ideal pup.
 

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The age I'd have no problem with, but the things you say she seems to consider deal breakers would be things I wouldn't want my breeder to have a say in. (Although dog parks are something I don't particularly like either, but there are some that are as safe as anywhere else.) I'm sure you'll find a breeder who suits you better and a pup that fits your household. Wish you the best.
 

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The reason for holding the pups back would be a red flag for me. You need your puppy to be well socialized during that early development window. I can’t imagine why they’d have an issue with their pups attending well-run puppy classes! Same goes for being exposed to the sights and sounds of everyday life.

If you’ve not already, I’d recommend you read Ian Dunbar’s Before and After Getting Your Puppy and use that to help in your decision-making process. It’s available from Amazon, but is also available for free as a PDF.

Part one: https://www.dogstardaily.com/files/BEFORE You Get Your Puppy.pdf

Part two: https://www.dogstardaily.com/files/downloads/AFTER_You_Get_Your_Puppy.pdf
 

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P.S. My urban puppy Gracie was so well-adjusted! That early exposure to a bustling city prepared her for 14 years of being by my side, wherever life took us. I’ve found it much harder to keep a dog social in a rural area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I also agree, it did throw me off, because while I'm aware of the dangers of aggressive dogs and am myself worried about that, it makes me worry that the dog would be pretty sheltered and unsocialized in those 6 months and then would have a big adjustment to living in a city (especially with the barky tiny dogs that flood Miami Beach where I live) and would also I think make it harder to travel, be in an airport or even any situation with a decent amount of stimulation with the pup.

If you’ve not already, I’d recommend you read Ian Dunbar’s Before and After Getting Your Puppy and use that to help in your decision-making process. It’s available from Amazon, but is also available for free as a PDF.

Part one: https://www.dogstardaily.com/files/BEFORE You Get Your Puppy.pdf

Part two: https://www.dogstardaily.com/files/downloads/AFTER_You_Get_Your_Puppy.pdf
Thanks! Just downloaded it and put it on my kindle, preparation materials always appreciated!
 

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And for the curious asked her more in detail as why she keeps them for so long and its mostly to let them go altered
OMG, I'm glad you're moving on to find another breeder. This alone is a red flag - not to wait till the dog is mature enough before spaying or neutering.
 
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