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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

I have been doing my research about poodles for months and can’t wait to get my new baby. However, my only issue is that I am moving to an apartment and a new state. How do you guys think the poodle will adjust or if the apartment life will work for us ?
Thank you
 

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My minipoo would be wonderful in an apartment. I think toy and standard poodles are also great choices especially if they have some exercise and training.

What size are you planning to get?
 

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Basil (Spoo) and I live in a 275 sq ft (mico) apt in West Seattle. Granted she's only 20 weeks old and 26-28# currently, but growing fast. She's happy being spoiled and soaking up any extra attention from strangers. The local pet store is about 20 yards away 😭 and we're on a first-name bases there. We still make time to go to hop in the car and visit the park 2-3x/week too. We're a very exercise focused family.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My minipoo would be wonderful in an apartment. I think toy and standard poodles are also great choices especially if they have some exercise and training.

What size are you planning to get?
Awww I love the minipoos too, but I am looking into the standard size.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Basil (Spoo) and I live in a 275 sq ft (mico) apt in West Seattle. Granted she's only 20 weeks old and 26-28# currently, but growing fast. She's happy being spoiled and soaking up any extra attention from strangers. The local pet store is about 20 yards away 😭 and we're on a first-name bases there. We still make time to go to hop in the car and visit the park 2-3x/week too. We're a very exercise focused family.
Omg she does sound spoiled I love it..... I am moving to Texas and the apartments look huge. I saw one that had an open space for the living room and dining room. I was thinking of just making it a tv room and leave the rest of the space open. I will also have a crate I will use for when am going to work, but will stop using it once he is potty trained. I have so many ideas, I am looking into a doggy camp or get getting someone to walk him when I am at work. I really want a poodle but I don’t want my neighbors to hate me because of him barking a lot. I think the barking is what I am extremely worried about, but I need a dog because I will be living by myself for the first time.
 

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We have some members who've navigated apartment life with a spoo. It's doable. They have a nice off-switch indoors if trained properly to settle at a young age. But you do need a solid exercise plan in place—ideally somewhere where your poodle can run safely off leash, especially through adolescence. Peggy's evening zoomies were a sanity saver for her AND us. She knew exactly what to do to drain her battery.

As for barking, Peggy's is much more ferocious-sounding but less persistent than my mini's was. I manage it by acknowledging her concern, stepping between her and whatever's triggered her (e.g get up and look out the window), and thanking her. She immediately stops. But......

She might continue sporadically "alerting" if she's restless or anxious or just plain bored. That can be a nuisance so, especially in an apartment, you'll need to get to the bottom of why it's happening. We can always help you with that. :)

And something as simple as leaving a mellow TV channel on quietly in the background can help muffle outside noise. (Peggy loves Turner Classic Movies.) Keeping the curtains shut is also helpful so your poodle doesn't obsessively sit and wait for the next bit of outside activity to bark at. Spoos can have a high prey drive, so movement is very exciting to them.
 

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Hi, and welcome! I live in an apartment complex with my Standard Poodle, and we make it work. As long as she/he gets plenty of exercise both mentally and physically, and gets to run, you guys will be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
We have some members who've navigated apartment life with a spoo. It's doable. They have a nice off-switch indoors if trained properly to settle at a young age. But you do need a solid exercise plan in place—ideally somewhere where your poodle can run safely off leash, especially through adolescence. Peggy's evening zoomies were a sanity saver for her AND us. She knew exactly what to do to drain her battery.

As for barking, Peggy's is much more ferocious-sounding but less persistent than my mini's was. I manage it by acknowledging her concern, stepping between her and whatever's triggered her (e.g get up and look out the window), and thanking her. She immediately stops. But......

She might continue sporadically "alerting" if she's restless or anxious or just plain bored. That can be a nuisance so, especially in an apartment, you'll need to get to the bottom of why it's happening. We can always help you with that. :)

And something as simple as leaving a mellow TV channel on quietly in the background can help muffle outside noise. (Peggy loves Turner Classic Movies.) Keeping the curtains shut is also helpful so your poodle doesn't obsessively sit and wait for the next bit of outside activity to bark at. Spoos can have a high prey drive, so movement is very exciting to them.
thank you so muchit would be horrible if we have neighbors that hate us lol.... I am very active but I guess these are sacrifices I need to make sure my baby won’t be barking all over the place lol. do you have a website where I can reach out to you? I need help to make sure that he is going to be comfortable and be stressed out. I actually was thinking about getting a loft or A townhouse to just have enough space for him.
 

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Hi, and welcome! I live in an apartment complex with my Standard Poodle, and we make it work. As long as she/he gets plenty of exercise both mentally and physically, and gets to run, you guys will be fine.
I am not that active lol but it is something I am working on because I know poodles need to run around and exercise. Just don’t want to an unfit dog parent lol
 

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My minipoo rarely barks. I thought there was something wrong with her voice because people could ring our door bell and she didn’t bark.
I was watching dog agility on tv and she saw those very determined and aggressive looking dogs coming through the weave poles and she started barking. She only barks at aggressive dogs.

My minipoos I had as a child also didn’t bark, but the tpoo we had when my kids were little barked too much. I’m not sure what the difference is but hopefully you won’t get a barker.

Dogs don’t need to run off leash to get exercise, nor do they need to be walked for many miles. A mix of a good walk to potty and training makes a well rounded dog with a turn off switch so they make great couch potatoes. Training them to be good pets uses a lot of brain power, a dog using their brain is a dog that is a happy couch potato.
 

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I got my spoo while living in an apartment. Its definitely doable, but, you end up having to be a way better owner and more careful trainer than most people in a house have to be. Offleash or long line running and play was ESSENTIAL to having a well behaved dog though.

No matter how much i walked and trained her, if she hadnt had a chance to tear around offleash in a week, she was miserable to live with. Dog parks arent always a great solution, the one in the town i lived in was full of aggressive dogs. So i tried to take her somewhere to run off leash or dragging a long line one , preferably 2 times a week, plus three 10-30 min walks/day. And i tried to train her NOT to play in the evening, which was harder. I would do it again though.
 

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My 10 month old Spoo and I are in an apartment and it has worked out very well. Ziggy tends to be very chill inside. A few pieces of advice to consider :

1) Going with a breeder that has a history of therapy dogs will help you find one with a quieter temperament than a hunting line.

2) Like others have said, lots of exersize is key.

3) I have made sure to always be calm in the apartment and to not rile him up indoors. He now seems to mirror my emotions and knows that indoors in where we are calm.

4) Mental stimulation is as, if not more important than physical exersize. If my guy is acting too excited, I'll do a training session with him or have him do "puppy push-ups" and then he will usually want to lay down and rest after. Poodles are smart and need lots of mental stimulation. I go with the approach that every meal has a purpose. Our meals are usually a full training session, feeding out of a maze bowl in a certain spot to desensitize him to sounds or locations (like in a crate, bathtub, next to a loud blow dryer), or out of a feeder ball. Feeder balls are amazing to get him worn out. After a long morning exersize session and breakfast out of a feeder ball, my guy will be chill for the rest of the day.
 

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I agree with the consensus: It's possible but not easy, especially if you live alone. Poodles really don't like to be home alone all day, and they need lots of physical and mental stimulation. You may find that your non-work time is consumed with taking care of your dog.

You said that you're not active, but you're hoping a dog will help change that. I think it's wise to look into doggy daycare and a dog walker (if you don't WFH). What's your experience with dogs? What kinds have you or your family had in the past?
 

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I am getting a standard poodle soon and I also live in a condo. I also am not the most active person, I don't go jogging or anything and sometimes can be downright lazy. My plan is to head to off leash areas, we have some beaches and walking areas where dogs can go off leash. I also plan to ( when the dog is old enough), to hire a dog walker to do two long hikes a week, which is something I have no desire to do. I am hoping two long work out sessions like this will help keep everyone happy.
 

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thank you so muchit would be horrible if we have neighbors that hate us lol.... I am very active but I guess these are sacrifices I need to make sure my baby won’t be barking all over the place lol. do you have a website where I can reach out to you? I need help to make sure that he is going to be comfortable and be stressed out. I actually was thinking about getting a loft or A townhouse to just have enough space for him.
I just meant we at Poodle Forum can help you out. Post questions any time! We'll be here for you. :) I'm not sure how I'd have navigated Peggy's first year without our knowledgable (and kind!) members.

As for getting more space, I didn't (and still don't) allow Peggy to run wild inside. And she doesn't take up a lot of room. She fits comfortably on the couch with my husband and me. So I'm not sure more indoor square footage is necessary, as long as you have a good spot for a crate and pen.

We kept Peggy's pen up until she was 15 months old. It was invaluable. I'd have happily kept it longer, but I got sick of looking at it and navigating around it.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
My minipoo rarely barks. I thought there was something wrong with her voice because people could ring our door bell and she didn’t bark.
I was watching dog agility on tv and she saw those very determined and aggressive looking dogs coming through the weave poles and she started barking. She only barks at aggressive dogs.

My minipoos I had as a child also didn’t bark, but the tpoo we had when my kids were little barked too much. I’m not sure what the difference is but hopefully you won’t get a barker.

Dogs don’t need to run off leash to get exercise, nor do they need to be walked for many miles. A mix of a good walk to potty and training makes a well rounded dog with a turn off switch so they make great couch potatoes. Training them to be good pets uses a lot of brain power, a dog using their brain is a dog that is a happy couch potato.
I have a yorkie he barks at everything but I live in a house now, so I can take him barking. My little sister will be keeping him because they love each other, which is why am looking at getting another dog.I plan on hiring someone to walk him when I am work and I will go walking with when I get out before bed. Training is definitely important and I saw a company I really like in Texas I have been doing some research let me tell you lol. I listen to a lot of jazz, classics etc so I also will be playing that for him before I leave for work. This forum is amazing thank you so much for the feedback
 

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I got my spoo while living in an apartment. Its definitely doable, but, you end up having to be a way better owner and more careful trainer than most people in a house have to be. Offleash or long line running and play was ESSENTIAL to having a well behaved dog though.

No matter how much i walked and trained her, if she hadnt had a chance to tear around offleash in a week, she was miserable to live with. Dog parks arent always a great solution, the one in the town i lived in was full of aggressive dogs. So i tried to take her somewhere to run off leash or dragging a long line one , preferably 2 times a week, plus three 10-30 min walks/day. And i tried to train her NOT to play in the evening, which was harder. I would do it again though.
Thank you so much, I actually was looking at walking him for 30-45 mins twice a day and maybe the walker can walk him for an hour. The experience and loyalty we get from our babies is worth anything, I don’t regret anything and I am looking forward to this new journey of mine. Thank you and i appreciate you
 

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My 10 month old Spoo and I are in an apartment and it has worked out very well. Ziggy tends to be very chill inside. A few pieces of advice to consider :

1) Going with a breeder that has a history of therapy dogs will help you find one with a quieter temperament than a hunting line.

2) Like others have said, lots of exersize is key.

3) I have made sure to always be calm in the apartment and to not rile him up indoors. He now seems to mirror my emotions and knows that indoors in where we are calm.

4) Mental stimulation is as, if not more important than physical exersize. If my guy is acting too excited, I'll do a training session with him or have him do "puppy push-ups" and then he will usually want to lay down and rest after. Poodles are smart and need lots of mental stimulation. I go with the approach that every meal has a purpose. Our meals are usually a full training session, feeding out of a maze bowl in a certain spot to desensitize him to sounds or locations (like in a crate, bathtub, next to a loud blow dryer), or out of a feeder ball. Feeder balls are amazing to get him worn out. After a long morning exersize session and breakfast out of a feeder ball, my guy will be chill for the rest of the day.
I have been seeing a lot of breeders online, but I found one in Texas that is highly recommended. Most of the Poodles I am seeing are from puppy find, but I don’t know if they are legit. Yea I am very calm and I don’t like a lot of noise. Is the maze bowl good? I have been seeing them but was a little skeptical, I am definitely going to take him for morning walks he will need it since I will be at work. I love your ideas thanks you so much appreciate it
 
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