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Hey guys!
I’m getting a 6 month old mini poodle (boy) in few days and its my first ever dog, any advises on what to buy/ how to train him/ tips for making my life easier ?? If thats a nice age to get a puppy or a younger one is better ?
Also I want him to pee/poop in the pet pad that i’ll place in my apartment’s balcony so is that doable or i’ll have to get him outside for a walk ??
 

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Hey Salma,

Congrats! happy for you. I also have 6 month mini poodle and they are adorable. She is my first dog also but she made me learn a lot
My first advice would be, do not let him to learn how to use you, then its hard to undo it. after few days I got mine, she suddenly loved treats and stopped eating her food, then we started to change diet since we were concerned, then she learnt that if she doesn't like food we change it and gave us hard times. now she started to understand I am the boss and she eats her food to at least to survive (as I am now strict about rules). But better to put certain rules from day one.
This is only one example to show you how smart they are. You will learn more as you have more time with your new boy.

I also placed the pads in balcony, it really works, however it was not so easy to teach her she should pee on pad :)
for poo, luckily she started to warn us from day one and we always go out for that, she never had accidents.

I would suggest to buy, initially, a crate to sleep, maybe a soft something as bed, some chew toys to release his stress due to relocation and teething, pee pads, some treats to have good first relation with him ( don't give much, only as reward :) and the same food as he had previously.

Enjoy your time with your new boy!

Cheers
 

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Hey Salma,

Congrats! happy for you. I also have 6 month mini poodle and they are adorable. She is my first dog also but she made me learn a lot
My first advice would be, do not let him to learn how to use you, then its hard to undo it. after few days I got mine, she suddenly loved treats and stopped eating her food, then we started to change diet since we were concerned, then she learnt that if she doesn't like food we change it and gave us hard times. now she started to understand I am the boss and she eats her food to at least to survive (as I am now strict about rules). But better to put certain rules from day one.
This is only one example to show you how smart they are. You will learn more as you have more time with your new boy.

I also placed the pads in balcony, it really works, however it was not so easy to teach her she should pee on pad :)
for poo, luckily she started to warn us from day one and we always go out for that, she never had accidents.

I would suggest to buy, initially, a crate to sleep, maybe a soft something as bed, some chew toys to release his stress due to relocation and teething, pee pads, some treats to have good first relation with him ( don't give much, only as reward :) and the same food as he had previously.

Enjoy your time with your new boy!

Cheers
Thank you, very helpful ! =)

Can you tell how you trained your dog to pee in the pad ?? also did she need training to sleep in the crate ?
 

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Congratulations! I think things will very much depend upon what your puppy's life has been like to date. Has he been used to sleeping alone in a crate, on a human's bed, in a heap of other dogs? Is he coming straight from his breeder, or has he lived with a family? How much experience has he had of the world through those early, formative months? The more you know, the more quickly you will be able to help him adjust to his new life in your home. This article is aimed more at those bringing very young puppies home, but if you think of it as kidnapping a child, rather than a baby, from another planet it still rings very true!

If your puppy is being rehomed because of issues with his first family it is even more important to have as much information as possible. Six months can be a wonderful age - well on the way to being toilet trained, past the extreme bitiness of puppyhood, sleeping through the night - but if a puppy has not been well treated, well socialised and well trained in those early months it is important to know, so that you can be prepared for any problems and be ready to help him over them.
 

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Some pups are more comfortable than others in crates, so acclimating them to it may be needed. The crate should always be a positive place for them, never for punishment. Fjm mentioned a number of things that will be very helpful for you to know about the pup's life so far.

The potty pads may be treated with an enzyme which has odor to draw them to it. I don't know the availability of these outside the US but this is another option.

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Some have successfully used kitty litter also.

Some training links:


Dr. Ian Dunbar, a respected animal behaviorist and trainer? He has a website full of very helpful information. There are two books particularly that I'll link for you. One is Before you get your puppy and the other is After. Both will have helpful information for you, to start with.

https://www.dogstardaily.com/files/BEFORE You Get Your Puppy.pdf

https://www.dogstardaily.com/files/downloads/AFTER_You_Get_Your_Puppy.pdf

Some of this may not apply but it's a standard list of items to consider. Apologies for US-centric references.

New Pup/Dog startup list

Crates, Carriers, Exercise Pens, Beds/Bedding, Travel
Harnesses, Collars, Leashes
Food, Water, Bowls
Enzyme Cleaner, Pee pads, Poo bags, Paper Towels
Toys
Grooming
Health, Vet, Vaccinations Vs Socialization, Insurance, Care Credit, Emergency funds
Puppy proofing inside and out, including kitties

This is really more your basic startup info. It's taken from other threads and posts that many active members of PF has contributed to. I hope more Pfer's will add to this, comment or correct any mistakes.

Crates, Carriers, Exercise Pens, Beds/Bedding, Travel

Crates
Hard side plastic or wire is best for early days. If you choose wire, be sure there are no sharp bits, and be very sure that the door will stay fully latched with a bumptious puppy in it. It's not common but there have been some concerning reviews mentioning injuries.
No collars in the crate for safety.
Look for one with a divider in the size you expect them to grow into and use the divider to keep them comfortably cozy (stand up, turn around, sleep) til then.
Use a blanket as a crate cover.
Use a washable bath rug/towels or sherpa crate mat for bedding.
Put something leak proof on the floor of the crate or under it.
Depending on the layout of the house/apt, consider 2 crates, one for the sleeping space, one for the living space.

If you can manage it, have the pup sleep in your bedroom. They just think they're on an adventure until bedtime, especially the first night, rolls around. Suddenly they realize that NOTHING is familiar, no scent, warmth or comfort of mom or siblings. They are Alone.

Ask the breeder to do this or bring a towel or blanket to get mom and siblings scent on it, to comfort them.
Keeping them in the same room allows you to hear if they are unwell or need to go out.
Expect to have the young ones out several times during the night for a while.
Set a periodic alarm to beat them to it.

Don't count on a lot of sleep the first days or weeks. Taking a few days off from work or work from home, if you can, will really help set routines and gives some time to get to know each other. Find out if the breeder had them on a daily routine and try to follow that for a few days.

They're facing so many instant and incomprehensible changes. Keep what you can the same for a while.

Ex Pen
This expands their relaxation space but keeps them contained and out of mischief.
Food and water bowls as well as pee pads can be in that space.
Use a leak proof flooring here also.
These can be plastic or wire or even pop up soft side. (Same caution on wire construction.)

Beds and bedding
This may depend on the pups age and what they're used to. A young pup probably doesn't need one just yet. An older pup or dog may already be using one.

Carrier
These are generally only good up to about 15lbs but have their place.
A smaller crate with handles can double as a carrier.

Travel
Keeping your pup comfortable and safe in the car is important.
Depending on size and age, you might use a carrier, a crate, or a harness with seat belts.

Sleepypod brand is a highest safety rated product. Testing was done by the independent Center for Pet Safety, with some testing sponsored by Subaru.
There are a number of threads covering other brand suggestions. You can use the Search function to find them.

Harnesses, Collars and Leashes
Harnesses are usually a better safety choice for smaller pups due to potential trachea injury from collars, but it may not be the best choice for a pup who wants to pull.
Collars will carry tags and ID but don't have to be worn inside the home due to potential choking hazards.

Food, Water, Bowls
It's best to keep them on the same food as the breeder had for a while. They're already under stress from the abrupt change in their lives and this is one thing that doesn't usually need to change immediately.
They may go off their feed as it is, so keep an eye on that.
Toys are especially subject to hypoglycemia. This can very quickly become fatal. Look for the sticky on it.
If/when you want to change foods, look for foods which follow the AAFCO guidelines and companies which have a veterinary nutritionist formulating the foods.
Stainless steel or ceramic is best for their food and water bowls.
You might consider filling a bottle with the water they've been drinking at the breeders and mix it with the water at their new home, to acclimate.

Enzyme Cleaner, Pee pads, Poo bags, Paper Towels, Bitter Apple Spray
Pretty much all self explanatory.
Natures Miracle is usually recommended for enzyme cleaner.
Bitter Apple Spray is to keep them from mouthing and biting on what you don't want them to.

Toys
Have a selection of several different types on hand.
Check with your vet for safe chewing toys. They also work as trade to get your fingers back
Puzzle toys are good, and Kongs to hide kibble and treats are helpful.
Not exactly a toy, but something to consider is the Smart Pet Love Snuggle Puppy toy. This can help soothe a pup.
/SmartPetLove-.../dp/B000C9YHFS[/URL]

Grooming
I hope others will have brand specific suggestions for combs, brushes, shampoos…
Generally, a puppy shampoo with or w/o conditioner added
Greyhound comb
Pin brush with rounded tips
Slicker brush
Dryer
Grooming table or designated area
Nail trimmer or Dremel tool
It is important to get them used to the grooming process asap.
The longer you wait, the harder it is on the pup and whoever's doing the grooming.
It does not hurt their coat to get a puppy trimmed

Health, Vet, Vaccinations Vs Socialization, Insurance, Care Credit, Emergency funds
Ask if any other dog on the premises has been ill in the last week or so. Choose a vet if you don't have one and know where the ER clinic is.
Have the pup checked out by a vet within a day or two of homecoming whether the breeder requires it or not.
Puppies can socialize with vaccinated adult dogs, and probably known puppies who aren't fully vaccinated yet.
Best to stay away from paws on the ground at places a lot of dogs might be til yours is fully vaccinated.
People are not usually any risk or at risk.
Consider pet insurance, at least for the first year or two, or sign up for Care Credit if there is a health emergency.
If you can, a healthy four figure separate savings account dedicated to emergencies can be a life saver, literally.
Keep a first aid kit and learn some first aid procedures.

Puppy proofing inside and out, including kitties, bunnies, older pets
Check your fencing if there is any. You want to keep things out as well as puppy in.
Check your plant life for possible toxic plants.
Inside keep cords and cables covered or out of reach.
Be sure that kitties or other free roaming animals in the home have a safe retreat from Puppy.
Anything puppy level is at risk.

Besides pet stores, there is Amazon, Chewy.com, and eBay and Etsy for supplies. Other brick and mortar stores if they're nearby are Tuesday Morning, Marshall's, HomeGoods, Sierra Trading Post and TJ Maxx. The last two are also online.
(Apologies for the US centric shopping references, but they're what I know.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you guys this has been very helpful =))
we brought the puppy home and here what's happening so far (first 2 nights): we placed his food and pee pad in the balcony
We wanted to keep him in a separate room with pads on the floor but he kept crying all night so we had him in our bedroom in a confined area with the lights on, he kept on crying but eventually stopped. the next day w fed him and he actually peed on he pad and pooped right next to it, we were so happy.
We decided to put the carpets on so he'd get used to it and we thought that he's familiar now with the pad (we put him on it, outside in the balcony every hour or two) then he decided to pee on the carpet, we placed him outside on the pad and cleaned the carpet (he peed on another one later)
He had dinner and actually pooped on the pad after. we decided to place his pad infront of the balcony and familiarize him with it and go to sleep and close our bedroom door. He kept crying for long time but we thought he needs to get used to being left alone. we woke up to find his poop on every carpet.
He also keep on digging where he pees! (carpet and pad) which is very weird we try to tell him no and stop ..
 

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I think you are trying to go much too far too fast. He needs to get used to you, his new home, and all the new rules, and has absolutely no way of knowing what is allowed and not allowed, or what you expect of him. Using the pad once does not mean he "knows" where it is and how to find it - it could be pure accident. Your job is to help him to learn, not by saying No! and Stop! (you may as well be saying Whizzlepop! for all that means to a puppy), but by setting him up to succeed. Remove any rugs etc, so they can't get soiled. Set up a comfy play pen for him, with a pad, bed, water and safe chew toys like a Kong for when you can't supervise him. Take him to the pee pad as soon as he wakes up, after eating or drinking, after playing, whenever he begins to sniff or circle, and every hour, and praise and treat him when he does something there. Many dogs "dig" with their back feet after pooping especially - if he is scrabbling with his front paws distract him with a toy or treat.

At night I would have him close by you for the first few nights at least - it sounds as if the poop everywhere might well be the result of panic. Perhaps a crate by your bed where you can drop a hand in to reassure him and hear him if he needs to use the pad in the night, or if you are determined not to have him sleep in the bedroom, make up an airbed or similar for yourself where you do want him to sleep. Leaving him to roam while you sleep is asking for trouble!

Remember - this is a very young child that you have kidnapped from another planet. Be kind!
 

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he decided to pee
Less a case of "decided" and more "gotta go now" I would think. Do you know if he was pad trained before coming to live with you?

Carpets are not the best idea with a still young pup. You want easy to wipe clean surfaces until he understands his new circumstances, new rules, new life. His world is upside down again, possibly for the second time in his short time on Planet Human. It's up to you to welcome him to it and to adjust, again to yet another set of rules.

If you haven't yet, you also need to have your vet evaluate his overall health asap by doing a wellness exam. This is not because something might be wrong but for the vet to establish a baseline of your pup's health.

He also keep on digging where he pees! (carpet and pad) which is very weird we try to tell him no and stop ..
The digging behavior is natural to dogs, When it comes to eliminations, it's either a behavior to spread his scent or alternatively, to cover it. This gives me the idea that pads might be new to him. Your good news is that he doesn't seem to be eating his poop.

When he does this or any behavior that you want to change, any words like "Stop" have no meaning to him. This is like telling a human infant to "Stop". Instead, distract and engage him with a toy or treat or something to help him place his attention somewhere else.

If there is a behavior that you want him to show in place of the one you don't want, show him what you want him to do instead. Name that behavior as you show him so he can start associating those sounds (words to humans) with the behavior you want.

we brought the puppy home and here what's happening so far (first 2 nights): we placed his food and pee pad in the balcony
How is it that his food is out on the balcony? Is his water out there too? Can he access water freely or does he need to be let out to get a drink? Water should always be available.
At his age, you can still feed 3 meals a day or transition to 2 meals (same amount divided accordingly).
separate room with pads on the floor but he kept crying all night so we had him in our bedroom in a confined area with the lights on, he kept on crying but eventually stopped.
He is alone, lost, scared, and in distress. As fjm wrote, keep him close and comforted thru this early transition time. For some, having a light on helps, for others keeping the sleeping area dark works better.

Give him a smaller sleeping area, an actual crate or exercise pen or both in combination, but very near to you so he can hear you or even close enough to reach down and soothe him. He is still acclimating so letting him "cry it out" is not appropriate. This is the time you build trust and trust has a foundation of feeling safe.

Example of an exercise pen:

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With a smaller pen area, a blanket can be tossed over the top and sides to help darken the area for sleep and muffle sounds.

If you have a larger pen (this type can have panels added to it to enlarge it) then a crate for sleeping can be added inside. A reasonable size crate for a miniature is 24" long by 18" wide by 17" or more high. Place the crate, food, water, toys, and pee pad so there's a designated area for each. You'd use this kind of set up when you're not directly supervising him. He's past many of the very young puppy issues in age but still has to learn much.

Here's an example of a larger pen area with the crate inside

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For now, you could have just the crate in the sleeping room and the expen out in the living area. I understand that space isn't always available to do this so using baby gates in doorways is another way to contain him til he's earned more access unsupervised.

Once he's comfortable in his new home with his new family, and just a few months older, you could then leave him free to roam but that privilege is earned by showing that he's learned from your teaching. My boys were about 8 months old before they were allowed full first floor unsupervised access but they'd been with us since almost 9 weeks old. I knew their behaviors and we had taught them what we expected.
 

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Thanks for the replies, please correct me if I’m wrong !
He’s super sociable with high separation anxiety, he was locked with his sister in a small room before we take him.
we wanted to get him used to sleeping alone and get used to the idea of us not there as we thought that now is the time we set rules and whatever we do for these first few weeks will stick with us. Having a crate near our bed is possible but he hates being locked he’ll keep on whining till we get him out and he has direct contact with us.
Also we put back the carpets to make him familiarize with the place as is and create clear rules.
We’re keeping the food and water on the other side of the balcony from his pad, we’ll keep the water available at all times later once he’s house trained to avoid accidents.
Peeing is controlled to some extend on the pad, but we can’t manage him pooping on carpets, and the digging with his front legs happen when I clean the rug after him.
 

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Please do not ever withhold water from your dog. Dehydration is not healthy, and can lead to increased urinary urgency and/or bingeing water when it’s available.

While I understand your tough love approach, it’s not advisable. You don’t leave a diaper off a baby because he or she “has to learn eventually.”

You want to reassure your new puppy, not create a more anxious puppy. And you want to prevent opportunities for mistakes. We lifted our rugs for Peggy’s entire first year with us—long enough for her to be reliably housebroken and to get through the start of adolescence when regression is normal.

Please pick up a good puppy manual (such as Ian Dunbar’s “Before and After Getting Your Puppy”) and follow it carefully. It sounds like your puppy had a very rough start to life. You will need to start from the beginning with training and socialization, and please lead always with kindness. You want a confident, healthy puppy, who knows that humans can be trusted.

Here are free links to Dr. Dunbar’s book:


 

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I agree with PtP - he will learn much faster and more easily from a base of confidence and trust in you than through being anxious and fearful. You are playing catch-up with a puppy that has missed out on a lot of important early experiences - you need to concentrate on his bond with you and his confidence in the world around him. With those in place everything else will begin to fall into place.

Leaving rugs down alongside pads is asking for trouble - of course he is going to confuse the two, and then be made anxious by your disapproval. Forcing him to sleep alone when everything is still strange and frightening is more likely to reinforce his fear then teach him how to cope with it - you can work on that in a few weeks' time, starting with just seconds or minutes alone during the day. I would try to shift your thinking away from "rules that must not be broken" to "behaviours we would like to encourage", and in the meantime set his world up to help him to succeed. Perhaps a cuddle-buddy toy with a heart beat would comfort him for being without his sister; a crate by your bed means you can drop your hand down to settle him when he cries; puppy proofing your home means less damage to possessions, and much less time cleaning up.

And I would never limit water, especially for a toy puppy. Dehydration can cause serious damage, and their tummies and bladders are too tiny to hold much.
 

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now is the time we set rules
Now is definitely not the time to set rules.
Now is the time to build trust and with trust comes confidence and a bond between you all.
I'm in complete agreement with PTP and fjm on the steps outlined above.

I'm so sad for this little boy. He's lost his sister and is alone in a strange land, even though he's with good people who will love him as he deserves.

Do you know what happened to his sister?

He's been with you for only a few days and you are expecting too much too soon from him.

Are the peepads a new idea for him or was he already trained to them? Were he and his sister taken outside before or just left locked in the room with no toilet accommodations? What training did they have, if any?

For now, for these first few short weeks, just hold this little lonely boy close in your heart. Stroke him and speak sweet things to him. Tell him what his life will be like now and tell him of all the adventures you all will share together. Gaze into his eyes and let him gaze back into yours. He will give you his heart in return.
 

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Hello. You can try this if you like? Don’t leave his food and water outside on the balcony. Feed him twice a day, in the morning and at dinner time. Leaving water down at all times. As soon as he wakes up and after he eats he will need to go to the bathroom. Do not talk or cuddle him at this time. Take him to his designated place for potty training and only say if needed to pee pee. During play puppies also will need to pee. Take him outside for a walk at least once or twice a day to socialize with people and learn to be a dog.
 

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Update XD
I followed your advises that were super helpful, put back the water and removed the carpet except for one that's under the dining table as its not possible to remove it. We also made him sleep in our bedroom, we put his bed, toys and pee pad there he hates being stuck in a crate so we let him move around with our bed as his only limitation, he stopped crying at night and became much happier.
90% of the times he pees on his pad which makes us very impressed, but he never poops there despite not rewarding him and placing it on his pad and letting him smell around, our one and only carpet is his favorite pooping area.
yesterday was our first night out without him after 4 days of not leaving him, we felt like guilty parents as he couldn't stop crying.
For Rose asking about his sister, the sellers didn't want to let her go I think for future breeding
 

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Sounds as if you are on the right track. If you can't remove the carpet under the table I suggest blocking it off or covering it up until he learns new habits. Are you using an enzymatic cleaner? It helps remove the smells that to a dog mean "This is the right spot".

Poor little sister - doesn't sound like a happy life...
 

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He is probably used to peeing outside. Instead of pee pads, I would use a kitty litter tray with kitty litter on the bottom and some dirt on top. If you can get grass, put that on top also.
 

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Progress! It may be a bit of a step or two forward, a step sideways, a step back, then two more forward, but it's always heading forward eventually.

It's wonderful thing that he's becoming a part of your family, but I feel so sad now for his little sister, left behind to that life. I hope she'll have some comfort and happiness in her life, too.
 

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Yes we're trying to monitor and guide as much as possible especially while we're still working from home, he learned the sit command today! he's such a smart little boy XD
Will update you guys if we get to know anything about his sister !
 

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Thank you for staying in touch on your little boy's progress. What's his name? and I'd love to see a picture, please :).

Thanks also for trying to keep an eye on his sister.

We get invested in what happens with all new members and their pups and always hope for updates.
 
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