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From another thread I discovered the Poodle Health Registry. I am interested in learning more about genetic conditions in poodles.

I wonder if one (or more) of the experts on here could tell me, if possible, why Standard Poodles have WAY more conditions that are shown in blue:

Poodle Health Registry Breed/Disease Listing!

Does that mean that Standards are more susceptible to genetic problems that Minis or Toys? And if so, can anyone tell me why this is? I did see something about "the Wycliffe influence" something like that - somewhere on the Internet. Is it suggesting that most of today's Standards are related to Wycliffe dogs? I suppose we are lucky nowadays because we know a lot more about genetics and have access to testing that was not available previously.

I am assuming that breeders do not test for all the conditions shown in blue. Perhaps there are not tests available for the conditions shown in blue. How would it help a prospective purchaser of any size poodle if a dog in their pedigree was shown on that site? I checked the first one for Addison's Disease and I have absolutely no idea what "Hypoadrenocorticism dx'd by ACTH stimulation test" means. How would the site be useful to a person if they have no idea what the results mean?

I'd appreciate it if I could learn more about the subject. Thanks.
 

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Purley,
You are asking for a 4 year college education. It takes a lot of time and effort to find/learn all the available information.
You can start with the links at the bottom of each disease page. Most of the current info can be found through those, then do a search for more info if needed.
Carole
 

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I checked the first one for Addison's Disease and I have absolutely no idea what "Hypoadrenocorticism dx'd by ACTH stimulation test" means. How would the site be useful to a person if they have no idea what the results mean?

I'd appreciate it if I could learn more about the subject. Thanks.
I can't help make the poodle registry easier to understand, but I sure can tell you a lot about this example you asked about! :eek:hwell: Hypoadrenocorticism is Addison's disease. It occurs when the adrenal glands stop working. No cortisone, or adrenaline is made when the adrenal gland doesn't work. One way they diagnose it is to look at the potassium/sodium ratio, as seen in a blood test. In primary addison's, the potassium will be really high, and the sodium will be really low, but not all dogs show this, Liberty didn't. The very best test is the ACTH stimulation test (which I had to fight for). When a typical mammal experiences stress, the pituitary gland in the brain makes a hormone called ACTH, which signals to the adrenal glands to get busy and make some cortisol and adrenaline. In this test, blood is tested before ACTH is injected into the body, and again 20 minutes after. If there's no change in hormone production, they know that if the adrenal glands aren't responding to the injected ACTH, they aren't responding to the ACTH made by the pituitary gland either, and the diagnosis of Addison's can be made.

How's that for a long explanation? Really, this is one topic I'd rather know a lot less about! :wacko:
 
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