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Discussion Starter #1
Can someone please tell me what tests a toy poodle should have before he should be bred? And what kind of general pricing each test comes with?

I am new to breeding and want to do it the responsible way.
I have quite a long time to get these tests done,
Thanks!
:)

(PS I would ask a vet but I don't have a trusted vet, just a meh vet. and we are in between. I like to go to vet offices with much knowledge before agreeing to anything)
 

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can you not talk to your breeder where you got your dog? That would be the first stop :) A reputable breeder would make sure that you knew what you were doing before breeding a pup you acquired from them IF you bought on an open registration and not a spay neuter contract.
 

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I would suggest you become a member of a poodle club and get involved with a breed very actively. Meet A LOT of show breeders and get a mentor who will help you make a correct start. There are many issues one have to consider before starting "breeding" beside health tests !!!!

Best of luck

PS: If your breeder did not do any tests - than definitely do extra homework and definitely do not take her as a mentor

PPS: You might want to read some of this : http://www.poodleclubofamerica.org/health.htm
 

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Do your homework AND follow your instincts. Some tests don't count till they are 24 mos old. Like my girl with the crooked tooth & curved tail, I DID do 3 of her tests at 12 mos but waited till age 24 mos to do hip xrays an d skin punch biopsy (the 2 costliest). I ended up not proceeding because I felt in my heart she wasn't ideal breeding stock. PS: she did have 2 litters - one at 4 yrs and she has one SUPRISE oops litter now. My other female had all tests done last year at 24 mos and is ready to go next heat cycle
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks! I am getting ready to start training him soon with the local kennel club they have alot of "show" people, and sport people there too, so they will be able to help me.

I think a few generations back or something they had tests done? But didn't seem too serious about testing, they honestly didn't ask many questions when I told them I was looking for a puppy for future breeding, although I had given them alot of information about myself in my first email.

His parents weren't champions, but his grandparents (on both sides) and most everyone else further back (at least one in every mating) was a champion.

I was thinking about getting into conformation with him so I am sure I can get alot of help when I do get him into something at the kennel club/training place.

Thanks :)
 

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Health issues for Standard Poodles:
A long-lived breed, Poodles are, nevertheless, subject to many genetic diseases. Runny eyes, cataracts and progressive retinal atrophy, which may cause blindness. Allergies and skin conditions are common, possibly due to unskilled use of clippers or allergies to shampoo and/or color reinforcer. Hip dysplasia and ear infections are also common. They are prone to Von Willebrand's Disease. Prone to bloat, so it is wise to feed your Standard 2-3 small meals a day, rather then one large one.
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/standardpoodle.htm



Health issues for Miniature Poodles:
A long-lived breed, Poodles are, nevertheless, subject to many genetic diseases. Prone to cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) which may cause blindness, IMHA (Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia), heart disease, diabetes, epilepsy, runny eyes, ear infections, and skin allergies.
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/miniaturepoodle.htm



Health issues for Toy Poodles:
A long-lived breed, Poodles are, nevertheless, subject to many genetic diseases. Some are prone to IMHA (Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia), slipped stifle, diabetes, epilepsy, heart disorders, PRA, runny eyes, ear infections and digestive tract problems. Eye problems such as cataracts and progressive retinal atrophy which can cause blindness. Skin conditions, possibly due to unskilled use of clippers. Allergies are common, sometimes to shampoo and/or color reinforcer.
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/toypoodle.htm
 
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