Poodle Forum banner

101 - 120 of 128 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
786 Posts
I will probably eventually have a gastropexy done on Hans, probably at UF teaching hospital (both because of cost and because they have a unit that specializes in it and will do traditional or laparoscopic.

Here's the way I think about it - you can agonize over statistics all you want, but the bottom line is either your dog bloats or they don't. I feel like if Hans bloats and I haven't had it done, I'll feel awful.

I also think there will be times where we are in remote areas and wouldn't be able to get to the vet in time if he did bloat. I've been in situations where it would have taken me hours to get emergency medical attention for a human, so I'm familiar with planning for that. I don't want to find myself in a situation where I have a bloated dog that is suffering terribly and nothing I can do. My mom lost a setter to bloat (bloated during a blizzard in a rural area) and she said it was horrible to watch.

Even though the neuter is less invasive than a spay, you'll still be dealing with one time under anesthesia and one recovery period if you do both at the same time, so there is that to consider.

Also, on lifetime risk vs incidence, as CharismaticMille says, if we take 100 dogs and put them in a study for a period of time and 5 of them bloat then the incidence of bloat was 5%. But if we follow those dogs for their lifetimes, we'd probably see a different number. Maybe 25 of them bloat over the course of their lifetime so their lifetime risk is 25%. To me, a 25% lifetime risk is concerning, and makes me want to do the pexy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
I am new to the poodle world and am going through reading and researching as much as I can so forgive me if this is a silly question/comment:

On a breeders website they extensively covered bloat and they were adamant that it comes solely from the breeder's poor ways and lack of experience (I am sorry if that offends anyone! Not my words or thoughts!) and they were adamant that none of the dogs they have bred have rarely/ever had a case of bloat.

Can I have some thoughts or inputs on that?

I just feel that is seems unlikely that so many breeders across the world don't know what they are doing and therefore predispose their dogs to bloat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,232 Posts
I believe that there is research evidence that bloat is linked to both genetic and environmental factors. As far as I am aware, though, there is no scheme for officially registering dogs who have suffered from it, so it is down to how complete the breeder's records are in tracing lines through the generations, and how honest they are about the results...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,611 Posts
Discussion Starter #104
I am new to the poodle world and am going through reading and researching as much as I can so forgive me if this is a silly question/comment:

On a breeders website they extensively covered bloat and they were adamant that it comes solely from the breeder's poor ways and lack of experience (I am sorry if that offends anyone! Not my words or thoughts!) and they were adamant that none of the dogs they have bred have rarely/ever had a case of bloat.

Can I have some thoughts or inputs on that?

I just feel that is seems unlikely that so many breeders across the world don't know what they are doing and therefore predispose their dogs to bloat.
Right. Nobody wants to lose a dog to bloat, or produce a dog that dies from bloat. The confirmed risk factors for bloat include breed, genetics and nervousness/stress.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
I just wanted to say thank you for this thread. I lost my Chewie to bloat almost a year ago. It happened while I was at work and even though I rushed him straight in to the vet within a half hour of getting home, it was too late.

I've been kicking myself wondering if it was something I did. Did I play with him too rough before going to work? Was there some little sign I missed that would have made a difference? Should I have been feeding him on a raised platform as I heard I was suppose to do? So many questions.

This thread has taken some of the guilt off my shoulders. I don't think I'll ever completely stop blaming myself, but it has been a great help knowing that I'm not alone.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
I don't want to take any chance of losing either of my dogs to bloat. Charlotte, my Spoo, will have a gastroplexy when she is spayed at 17 months. But what about my half Spoo, 25% Jack Russell, 12.5% Beagle, 12.5% Other mix? She was spayed very young by the rescue, at about 12 weeks of age. She has the frame of a small Spoo....long legs, deep chest.


Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
644 Posts
I have learned in my canine IBD forums that there is a connection between IBD and bloat; in that it's possible dogs with IBD may be more at risk for bloat.

If your dog has GI symptoms that wax and wane, consider that a big warning sign. (signs include yellow morning vomit, diarrhea/vomiting that comes and goes mysteriously, not wanting to eat in the morning, trouble holding weight, etc).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
I have learned in my canine IBD forums that there is a connection between IBD and bloat; in that it's possible dogs with IBD may be more at risk for bloat.

If your dog has GI symptoms that wax and wane, consider that a big warning sign. (signs include yellow morning vomit, diarrhea/vomiting that comes and goes mysteriously, not wanting to eat in the morning, trouble holding weight, etc).
So, I took Daisy, my half Spoo mix to my vet and I asked her about doing a gastroplexy. She said that because Daisy is only 33#, she is less likely to suffer from BLOAT. She also said that since Daisy has already been spayed, it was not worth the risk of surgery to open her up to do the gastroplexy. Had Daisy not been spayed, she said she would have done the gastroplexy at the same time. Fortunately, Daisy has not had any GI issues. However her 10 week younger Spoo "sister," Charlotte has had GI issues. Charlotte is having a gastroplexy when she is spayed June 19th. Charlotte is at least 20# heavier than Daisy, so Charlotte is a bigger dog! I appreciate your valuable info so much! Thank you! Lana

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
My wife and I debated a fair bit on whether or not to get our spoo Willard a pexy.

It’s a tough call, because you don’t want to spend hundreds on preventing a single low to medium probability problem, when there are 50 other ways he could get sick or die. But, if our dog does bloat, it will either be fatal, or more expensive than the preventative surgery. We opted against pet insurance, so we don’t have that to fall back on either.

In the end, we concluded that we are able to pay for the surgery, and we are going to have it done. It will be done laparoscopically, so hopefully it is successful, he heals up real quick, and lives a long and happy bloat free life.

Willard’s appointment is set for a date in June.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,896 Posts
rkj_ as a thought on insurance vs. no insurance what our vet suggested when Lily and Peeves were puppies was to put the $$ that we would have spent on insurance in an emergencies only savings fund. We now have quite a bit of money there and could cover any urgent care needed. Another option is Care Credit.
 
  • Like
Reactions: snow0160

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
My favorite standard (now deceased) was named Spencer Tracy. He was magnificent and absolutely perfect. At then age of 10 he developed bloat at about 11 o'clock at night. We were very lucky that we had an emergency vet. hospital nearby. It outrageously expensive - but I didn't care - just pull out my plastic and grimaced. I was thankful that we had such a facility. He recovered successfully. Unfortunately at the age of 12 he developed a pericardial effusion secondary to cancer. He died shortly after being diagnosed. Still miss that wonderful dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,103 Posts
You were lucky to have Spencer Tracy survive his bout of bloat, not all dogs do. But how sad that he died at 12 yo from pericardial effusion. He clearly meant a lot to you, he must have been a great dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Say alert

Thank you for your kind remarks.

I'd not heard of bloat before, but fortunately, I knew something was wrong. My normally calm dog starting pacing and became restless. When he refused his favorite forbidden snack, there was no doubt, something was definitely wrong.

Behavior changes were the first signs. Owners with dog who show restlessness and behavior changes, please take your dog to the vet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Our 2 year old Standard Poodle Snow developed bloat/twisted gut and went through surgery this morning. The prognosis is looking good so far. Luckily we caught it early, because my son had read a vet book recently and recognized the signs. Somehow I'd missed this thread until this evening, so I didn't have a clue just how serious things were until our vet confirmed the diagnosis and sent us directly to the Emergency Vet as he was still stable for the time being but wouldn't stay that way for long if we waited.

After doing some reading up I've called his breeder to let her know, so that she could let Snow's siblings' owners know to be on the lookout since they would have an increased risk now. Apparently this is the first case she's had of a Poodle in her lines experiencing bloat (or if there have been others they must not have notified her), so she was both concerned about how Snow was doing and I could hear through the phone that she was trying to mentally bring up the breeding records to figure out which lines were affected.

Right now I'm just hoping and praying that he continues to do well and recovers to spend a long happy silly life with us. I do love the big galute!

I'm so grateful that my son has developed an interest in becoming a vet, had read that book describing the signs, and recognized them when it was still early enough to get Snow help. When our vet confirmed that he had come to the right conclusion, she went so far as to say she thought he's going to be a great vet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
So glad that you/your son recognized the signs and got your boy to the vet quickly. Bloat and bloat/torsion are always emergencies where you often have precious little time to address the issue before it is too late. While not a good thing your dog bloated, it is likely a good thing that he was young and strong and was better able to handle the surgery. Dogs that are 9, 10, 11 etc. and bloat are usually not nearly as good surgical candidates and sometimes do not make it through or have complications afterwards and are lost then. I would assume your vet performed a gastropexy as part of the treatment. I lost my first Standard to bloat/torsion many, many years ago at 13 and she was not a surgical candidate so I had to let her go. Which I was happy to be able to do to end her suffering. Not sure if this is your first Standard, but if you ever get another one you might want to look into and discuss with your breeder a prophylactic gastopexy. Many breeders of dogs at high risk of bloat such as Great Danes, Standard Poodles, etc. often discuss with their puppy buyers as my breeder did with me. I do one on my bitches when I spay them (I don't spay until they have gone through a heat and are close to 2 so the stomach is fully developed). My breeder has not had bloat in her lines but I chose to do the pexy to stack the odds in my favor. A pexied dog can still bloat, but in most cases won't torsion so while you still need to get to a vet with a bloating dog ASAP, you can buy yourself some time in hoping torsion won't occur. Some vets don't believe in doing the prophylactic gastropexy considering it an unnecessary surgery, however, my vet is fully on board with doing it on high risk breeds. She used to be the director of the local animal emergency and did many pexies on dogs that came into the hospital in full bloat crisis. She said she would rather do the surgery on a young healthy dog than one that comes in already compromised and in major distress while bloating..I hope your boy's recovery continues to go well!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,259 Posts
Oliver and I wish Snow a full and rapid healing. I too hope they were able to do the gastropexy, but if not, when he's all recovered, it may be something to consider. Congratulations to your son and his successful analysis, and to you all for not waving him off. You have an observant vet who made a good call, too, and who did not wave you off, either. All the way around, good job in a difficult situation requiring immediate action.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Yes the vet said he would do the gastropexy as a part of the procedure. The way he described the procedure, it wasn't even treated as something optional. Given the situation, I believe that is the way to handle it. I will take some comfort in knowing if he ever has bloat again it will be highly unlikely that it will be accompanied by twisting, thus making his chances of a good outcome that much better.

As much as I love my poodle boy, I don't believe that we will ever get another Standard. If there's another dog in our future it will be a smaller dog, perhaps a miniature poodle or keeshond. He's a sweet dog, but such a BIG klutz. He can do some major damage without meaning any harm. Maybe once he finishes growing out of his puppy brain that will improve some. Fingers Crossed!!

Currently waiting on a call this evening updating me on Snow's progress. Of course since I haven't heard anything yet that is indicative that he's doing well, as they would have called sooner if there was reason for concern.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,103 Posts
Spinningbunnyfluff, I’m so sorry your poodle Snow suffered a scary episode of bloat. Thank goodness your son is not only smart but observant and you took action immediately.

I hope Snow has a smooth and easy recovery, especially now that the holiday season is upon us.
 
101 - 120 of 128 Posts
Top