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While 4.4% of the dogs in the study experienced GDV, I believe the actual lifetime risk of a standard poodle experiencing GDV is actually closer to about 25%. A LOT of standards bloat. They tend to do it big and die fast. When looking at a pedigree, it's difficult to find one without dogs who have bloated themselves or who have siblings or offspring who have bloated.

And just an FYI. You can know the symptoms, be very knowledgeable about bloat, have Gas-X, pet insurance, and be close to a 24 hour emergency vet and lose a dog to bloat. I have personally had 2 of 7 dogs bloat. Unrelated dogs, completely different body types and personalities. One was saved, the second one died.
I have owned 3 standards, have friend/family and neighbors own around 10 and reviewed with various breeders account for around 50 others and not one has seen a case of bloat. There's always numbers to prove any case.

None of this helps decide. Our local vet will do it for $1000, board certified is $2000 and lap' is over $3000.
 

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Good Lord. I was charged $700-ish for the spay and gastropexy, both traditional, and I live in a very expensive area. I can't believe some of the price quotes I hear!
 

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Discussion Starter #84
I have owned 3 standards, have friend/family and neighbors own around 10 and reviewed with various breeders account for around 50 others and not one has seen a case of bloat. There's always numbers to prove any case.

None of this helps decide. Our local vet will do it for $1000, board certified is $2000 and lap' is over $3000.
As a breeder, I am telling you it is very common. It is difficult to find a stud dog to breed to who either hasn't bloated, or doesn't have siblings and/or parents and/or offspring who have bloated. Talk to any show poodle handler and they will tell you just how often they see bloat. It's a lot.

I would look for a vet teaching hospital perhaps? Our specialty vet charges $1,000 for the laparoscopic but its only about $350-$650for an open gastropexy.
 

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Good Lord. I was charged $700-ish for the spay and gastropexy, both traditional, and I live in a very expensive area. I can't believe some of the price quotes I hear!
I'm in the San Jose area also (Morgan Hill), where are you getting those kind of quotes? Was this full or lap, regular vet or board?

Thanks.
 

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I'm leaning toward preventative surgery at the time of spaying/neutering for my as-yet-unborn spoo. (I like to plan in advance!) Is this procedure common enough that most vets do it regularly? I'm wondering if I should find a specialist.
 

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I'm in the San Jose area also (Morgan Hill), where are you getting those kind of quotes? Was this full or lap, regular vet or board?

Thanks.
Adobe Animal Hospital South Bay :) Dr. Clare did her surgery--she's usually at the Los Altos location. It was traditional (full) and I don't even know if she's board certified. She did a fabulous job. I didn't have much time to hem and haw over options because Maizie had swallowed the toy and required an emergency gastrotomy, so I had the three procedures done at the same time. She recovered as she would have from a spay only--i.e., very quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter #88
I'm leaning toward preventative surgery at the time of spaying/neutering for my as-yet-unborn spoo. (I like to plan in advance!) Is this procedure common enough that most vets do it regularly? I'm wondering if I should find a specialist.
You will need to check with your vet. It just depends on their clientele. I do believe that experience is important in choosing a vet to perform the procedure. I prefer to use one who is very experienced in them.
 

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Adobe Animal Hospital South Bay :) Dr. Clare did her surgery--she's usually at the Los Altos location. It was traditional (full) and I don't even know if she's board certified. She did a fabulous job. I didn't have much time to hem and haw over options because Maizie had swallowed the toy and required an emergency gastrotomy, so I had the three procedures done at the same time. She recovered as she would have from a spay only--i.e., very quickly.
Thanks maybe I'll do it next time Teddy swallows a toy :)
 

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Oh, I hope that NEVER happens to another dog! I had an absolute breakdown over it. It was very traumatizing. However, thankfully, recovery from the surgery wasn't too bad for my baby girl.
Our last standard had 3 surgeries for swallowing toys or parts of toys. This one has swallowed something three times, twice he threw it up later (didn't know he had even swallowed it), the third time they got it out at the vet without surgery. Needless to say all soft toys are now long gone (so he is just obsessed with dishcloths instead)
 

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Our last standard had 3 surgeries for swallowing toys or parts of toys. This one has swallowed something three times, twice he threw it up later (didn't know he had even swallowed it), the third time they got it out at the vet without surgery. Needless to say all soft toys are now long gone (so he is just obsessed with dishcloths instead)
I'm sorry you've been through it and so many times! Sheesh, what is it with some dogs?? All soft toys here are gone too, and yes, Maizie loves dishcloths and towels, so they are out of reach!
 

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Discussion Starter #94 (Edited)
Looked into the whole incidence of bloat in the Purdue study versus lifetime risk. 4.4% of Standard Poodles in the Purdue Bloat study experienced bloat, and 11.6% of Danes experienced bloat in the study. According to Jerold S. Bell, DVM from the 2003 AKC Gazette, the lifetime risk of a Great Dane bloating is 42.4%. If you compare the incidence of bloat in the study among Standard Poodles versus Great Danes, around a 20% risk , give or take, is a reasonable ballpark figure.

http://www.goldenrescuestlouis.org/Bloat.asp
 

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Discussion Starter #96 (Edited)
Just wondering how they get the translation between 4.4% and 20%?
Well, I don't have an official source to back up the 20% ish risk. But the 11.6% incidence and 42.4% lifetime risk for Danes is quoted.

ETA! Oh! I do actually have a source for a 25% lifetime risk for Standard Poodles.
 

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Just mathematically I don't understand the difference between the two numbers. If life time risk is 50% that would imply 1 of 2 has the issue, so surely incidence risk should also be 50%

Just wondering really.
 

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Discussion Starter #99
Just mathematically I don't understand the difference between the two numbers. If life time risk is 50% that would imply 1 of 2 has the issue, so surely incidence risk should also be 50%

Just wondering really.
I truly do not know. But, one of the authors that projects the lifetime risk of GDV in Standard Poodles as 25.3% was the epidemiologist who conducted the Purdue study, so surely there was a method to his madness! I'm really not a stats person......
 

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Discussion Starter #100
Okay...re: incidence versus lifetime risk. A very smart friend of mine (because I don't pretend to be good at statistics) tells me that incidence is the number of new cases that occur over a set period of time (usually a year?) and that lifetime risk takes into account many other factors (one of them being the increased risk based on age, etc.)
 
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