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Discussion Starter #1
A fellow I follow on Facebook, "Terrierman," recently posted the text of one of his earlier blogs.

I often read sad and awful tales on this forum about beloved dogs being set upon by other dogs. I think sometimes other dogs target poodles because ... who knows why? They look different? I don't know.

This gentleman has some practical advice based on experience. You might even avoid being bitten yourself.

Read and remember.

 

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I scanned, but agree that is an excellent article. It is well worth it for everyone here to read and share it.
 
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I scanned, but agree that is an excellent article. It is well worth it for everyone here to read and share it.
Thanks. I wouldn't have changed a word, and certainly don't have the experience this guy has. He's a little blunt sometimes, but generally right on target.
 
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If you aren't comfortable with tail/leg grab, fling a leash under the belly & catch it, loop it through the handle & lift with it around the 'waist', where the author recommended grabbing near the thigh. Should the dog lash back on the person, you extend the arms & it's pretty hard for the bite to grab you

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Not reaching for the collar is truly excellent advice. It seems like common sense, but common sense often evaporates when we're panicking.
Ya know, it might not be a bad idea to rehearse the moves with a dog you already know. How hard is it to pick him/her up by the tail? By the waist? With a leash? Can you actually "gently" move the dog in an arc, which would allow the bottom dog to escape?

Like CPR training, it helps to practice the technique before you actually need to use it--and I hope you never need that knowledge!
 

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Ya know, it might not be a bad idea to rehearse the moves with a dog you already know. How hard is it to pick him/her up by the tail? By the waist? With a leash? Can you actually "gently" move the dog in an arc, which would allow the bottom dog to escape?

Like CPR training, it helps to practice the technique before you actually need to use it--and I hope you never need that knowledge!
Yes. Practice will make a huge difference. there is only one thing in his article I take issue with & that's the idea that the bottom dog will just want to get away. I say most of the time that's the case but not always. You'll be in a mess if that bottom dog doesn't know he's to run off instead of keep fighting.

If you are alone with no help. Do the leash trick & go tie that sucker off then do the same with the 2nd dog. It's a booger to get done but I've done it. 3 basset hounds in mortal combat. Got them tied off & still had to squirt them with the water hose to subdue them. I was exhausted. They were still mad. We never figured out what sparked the fight.

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Excellent information and I enjoyed the article. BUT.. what if your 8 lb. toy poofle is attacked by an aggressive, large dog? I understand not getting your body between to avoid being bitten, but if my Sammy were to be attcked by a large dog? It would only take seconds for a large dog to kill him. At least, I would most likely survive a mauling.

I was hoping to become more social through dog training/activities. It has been fun and rewarding, but I find my biggest criteria for any activity we do ( including just walking on our street) is if we encounter other dogs and how those dogs behave. By far, the best experiences we have had is in controlled dog obedience classes. Even in this environment, I had an adolescent husky unexpectedly lunge at Sammy, unprovoked. Instictually, I fell/plowed between and I did get caught up in the leashes( I didn't get bit, miraculously ). At first, I don't think the husky was going for blood, but when those leashes got tangle, he became much more agressive.

So now, I scan every environment for possible dangers. Didn't even think about that when researching/looking for my poodle. It is now a way of life.
 

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Situational awareness is very important. I took tae kwon do for maybe 20 years and advanced several degrees into black belt territory. But I would never wade into a bar fight to set people straight. What I do in every unfamiliar place is check who's there and where the exits are, and keep my ears open for rough talk.

It's ever so much better to not get into a fight at all than it is to win (or lose) one.
 
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