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Welcome to you and your new baby girl. I'm really glad you have another dog to help show her the ropes. I've been lucky to have older dogs available to mentor all my puppies. I'm dismayed to hear your girl's breeder would place her out at 6.5 weeks; she's missed some important puppy development by losing access to her siblings so early. I agree with the other recommendations for the Ian Dunbar books; he goes into a lot of detail about both bite inhibition and socialization. You will find this background information immensely helpful.

If you haven't already, you should get her into the vet immediately to start her immunizations and also to get her tested for parasites.

You should also introduce her to grooming immediately. Poodles have high maintenance coats, and grooming is just part of their life. A good breeder will have bathed the pups and trimmed face, feet, and sanitary areas several times before sending the puppies to a new home. Since you got your girl young, you'll have to make sure she gets her puppy spa experience. I gave my pups a bath in the kitchen sink within a day of bringing them home and continued bathing them in the sink every few days until they got too big to fit. I think they had their first pro grooming appointments at around 12 weeks. Good groomers tend to book out several weeks in advance, so start calling around now to set up her first puppy appointment. It's also important to introduce puppies to the feel of a trimmer as soon as possible; you don't want them freaking out when they go to the groomer the first time. If you don't feel confident actually trimming, that's ok. Just make a happy game of bringing the trimmer (or some other buzzing appliance, like an electric toothbrush) to each foot and the sides of her face, and reward her with a treat each time.

I slept with each new pup on the couch near the back door for a while after bringing them home. It was comforting for the pup to have me near, plus I could grab the pup and sprint to the door when he woke me up squirming. However, it is important to get the pup used to staying in a crate too. When my boy Galen was around a year old he got quite sick and needed to spend a night at the vet getting IV fluids. I was very glad he was ok with sleeping in a crate; the whole thing would have been even more traumatic if that had been his first crate experience.

Be prepared for her to enter her first fear period sometime within the next few weeks. Fear periods can come on suddenly and are a bit of a shock. Suddenly a previously sane and confident puppy starts freaking out about the most ridiculous things: there's a garden gnome sitting in the yard; you chose to wear a baseball cap that day; someone turned the ceiling fan on, etc. Be kind, calm, gentle, and supportive during this period. Let her observe the scary thing from a distance without forcing an interaction. The calm example of your senior dog will help a lot as well.

As she gets older you may find yourself wondering if your puppy is demonically possessed. Poodle puppies love to play. Puppy play tends to involve jumping, chasing, wrestling and biting. She will probably target your senior dog the most. However, if he's too boring and grumpy, she will probably try to play with your cats and you instead.
 

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Great to hear that she's on target for shots and grooming. You might want to sign her up for puppy kindergarten once she gets sufficiently far enough along in her vaccinations. It was very helpful for my most recent puppy. The classes consisted of a mixture of training drills and playing with the other puppies. Even though puppy Ritter had the constant companionship of my young adult, Galen, it was good for him to learn that other puppies don't tolerate being tackled the way Galen did.
 

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Great to see cuddling sessions with the cats. Being able to tone things down enough to please a cat is a great skill for a puppy.

I started taking my puppies out in public as soon as they came home. Initially Galen only got to meet the neighbors at the end of his leash, as we were in Covid shutdown. Things had opened up more when Ritter came along. While he was still too young to be done with his shots we put him in a backpack with his head sticking out the top and took him out to see the sights.
 
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