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as I get more involved, I am noticing more and more people "fostering " out their bitches. Is this a common practice? how many bitches should one owner have in residence?
I can see why it would be easier to technically own alot of dogs if they dont live with you, but what are the pros and cons of fostering out their breeding dogs.
 

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I think fostering is a terrific idea for both the owner and the foster parents as long as the partnership is a good one, is amicable, and that everything is clearly understood and stated in a contract.

Some of the pros are....there are as ton of people out there who would dearly love a Poodle. They may have grown up with one or have kids with allergies. But, some of these folks might not be able to afford one. If someoone fosters, they get the joy of living with the dog without all of the expense. They are responsible for general health care (shots, physicals, teeth cleaning as the dog ages, etc.) grooming costs and food but don't have the outlay to purchase ther dog.

For the owner-breeder the benefits are plenty. I have four dogs in my home, and my partner and I have decided that since we are not getting any younger, and since there are four hands between us, this is a reasonable number of dogs in our house. But because I breed dogs, I may produce a puppy that is outstanding and wish to keep, or may buy a puppy to further my program. At this time this puppy would not be living with me, so a foster family is the answer. I would be responsible for its registration costs, its first shots and vet physical, micro chip insertion and any costs incurred until it is placed. I am responsible for the costs to do health testing. If I wish it to be shown in any field, that is my responsibilty. The foster family must make the dog available to me for health testing, breeding, and if it is a female and they do not wish to whelp litters, I would pick her up about the seventh week of her pregnancy to come here and whelp her babies. She would go back to her foster family once the puppies are weaned. If the dog is a female that is going to be bred, or if the fostered dog is male and is going to be used at stud, the foster family should live within an hours drive of me so I can get to the quickly.

The benfits are huge, if it is done right. I dont feel anyone should have so many dogs that any of them get lost in the shuffle or become part of the woodwork. I feel every dog should feel like a valued, cherished part of a loving family. So, in order for my plans to come to fruition, I will constantly be needing more breeding dogs, but if I had them all here, I would be over run with canines which would not be fair to them. I am also anti-kennel dogs as I think that life tends to suck for the dogs. So, a foster family is the perfect solution.

My boy Flynn is fostered by my sister and her family. He is the joy of their hearts, and beloved by the entire family. He goes for four walks a day, goes to the dog park, snuggles into bed with them each night and lives THE life!! My other male who I co-own with my best breeder friend, lives with a friend of one of my puppy buyers. He has two human sisters and all four people in his new family adore him. If they lived in a breeding home with tons of dogs, they could not possibly get the affection or attention they get in these homes. If they were kennel dogs, their lives would be totally different.

Trusting someone to take your precious breeding dog is a whole other story. You need a rock solid contract which protects this dogs at all costs. Communication is key. Everyone needs to be on the same page with a full understanding of what is expected at both ends. You should be very comfortable and relaxed with one another. You need home visits to ensure what you hear is truth. The fostering family must have plenty of dog experience. They need to have a fully fenced yard. They should provide you with references of a veterinarian and groomer they have used in the past. There should be something in the contract which states if this dog dies from a careless act, that you will be compensated for your loss. I also have in my contract that in the event the dog dies, the body is to be taken to a vet to have its micro-chip scanned, and I want a letter from the vet stating the cause of death with the chip number notated to confirm how the dog died, and that is was indeed my dog that passed away. They must agree to provide me with tons of photos and videos so I can see the dogs condition, stay abreast of its development and growth, and so I can post photos on my web site. They must agree keep it well groomed and fed good quality food.

The biggest con is, sometimes you will find people who sign agreements and are very earnest, then do not do what has been laid out, like providing photos. So, it should be in the contract that you have the right to remove the dog if problems asrise.

I will think of one thousand things I should have added once I hit submit, but I feel fostering is a wonderful solution to the space problem for a breeder if you are careful and ensure what you have been presented with is what is actually going on, and that your dog is in a loving, caring family that cherish your dog, and that there is a very good contract in place which protects all involved.
 

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In theory, the idea is not a bad one. A breeder can get over-dogged very quickly and if you are going to go forward with a breeding program, then you need more than one Poodle. I co-own Gracy with KB and until recently, Gracy lived with her full time (though that is a bit different situation).

I've said this before, but I will say it again... there are other things to do with a bitch besides fill their uterus. Breeders should be proving their breeding stock through some sort of conformation or performance showing. Is the breeder going to be showing or working the dogs who are fostered out? This is where fostering is probably easier in other breeds because it is the rare foster home who could care for Poodle show coat. Finding a performance foster home is probably easier, but how do you make sure that people follow up on their promise to put an Obedience or Agility title on a dog? It is not easy to work a dog who lives full time with someone else.

In the end, I think the practice of fostering is being abused by many low end breeders. It is currently very popular with Doodle breeders. Fostering allows a breeder access to many, many dogs while still maintaining the allusion of being a small hobby breeder. I've seen some breeders who have 10+ breeding bitches. When I see large scale fostering, I think it is because they essentially view dogs as a money maker. More bitches to breed.... more money to make.
 

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In theory, the idea is not a bad one. A breeder can get over-dogged very quickly and if you are going to go forward with a breeding program, then you need more than one Poodle. I co-own Gracy with KB and until recently, Gracy lived with her full time (though that is a bit different situation).

I've said this before, but I will say it again... there are other things to do with a bitch besides fill their uterus. Breeders should be proving their breeding stock through some sort of conformation or performance showing. Is the breeder going to be showing or working the dogs who are fostered out? This is where fostering is probably easier in other breeds because it is the rare foster home who could care for Poodle show coat. Finding a performance foster home is probably easier, but how do you make sure that people follow up on their promise to put an Obedience or Agility title on a dog? It is not easy to work a dog who lives full time with someone else.

In the end, I think the practice of fostering is being abused by many low end breeders. It is currently very popular with Doodle breeders. Fostering allows a breeder access to many, many dogs while still maintaining the allusion of being a small hobby breeder. I've seen some breeders who have 10+ breeding bitches. When I see large scale fostering, I think it is because they essentially view dogs as a money maker. More bitches to breed.... more money to make.
I totally agree with this. Fostering can be a great practice to keep up a breeding program and ensure all the dogs have a happy home life. But it can also be a way to "hide" the fact that you're a high volume breeder and your sole motivation for having/ breeding dogs is to produce a large number of puppies.
 

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On the topic of foster homes maintaining show coat.... I fully plan to foster all future show dogs with Vacheron!!!!!!


:rofl::rofl::rofl:
 

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I totally agree with this. Fostering can be a great practice to keep up a breeding program and ensure all the dogs have a happy home life. But it can also be a way to "hide" the fact that you're a high volume breeder and your sole motivation for having/ breeding dogs is to produce a large number of puppies.
I think I would have to agree with this as well.. I do not think it is necessary at all..I was always told growing up that the world will never miss another litter......But I do agree with the grooming thoughts cbrand i would love that ...
Fostering for show coats....OH YES!!!
 

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Here we go again. Sorry I replied...
Why did you think my reply was a slam at you?

Personally, I would consider fostering, but as I stated, it would have to be a special situation. I already have an agreement to place a male at some future date with a woman I know who trains Hunt Competition dogs. It is a win, win situation. She gets a good quality poodle and I have a potential stud dog in a working home.

The part I still haven't worked out in my mind is how we would finish this boy. You have to start a working retriever from the very beginning. Water and training collars = bad show coat.
 

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Honestly I think its just a way for high volume breeders keep a large amount of dogs with out having to care for them yet breed from them.

I think if you wanted to keep a dog in your breeding program use a co-ownership contract or a stud from another kennel.
 

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The following is JMHO… Some might agree, some might disagree, but as stated it is just an opinion (and after I typed this out, I saw PP’s post about co-ownership instead of fostering… Are they different????):

I think if the breeder and the foster home are both “in it” for the right reasons it can be a great idea (for many of the reasons mentioned earlier) If the breeder has so many fostered dogs that they lose track of them, or cannot adequately monitor the foster homes’ activities with said dogs, then; yes, I agree this could quickly turn into a bad situation.

I probably won’t be retiring for many years, but I’ve daydreamed about how fulfilling it would be for me to provide a safe, nurturing home in a situation like this once I’m not working my 40 hrs per week job… I truly have no desire to start a grass roots breeding program – I know how much commitment, labor, finances, dedication, blood, sweat and tears go into a reputable program… I’d like to play a part in that effort, but not be the “boss” of it (if that makes any sense…) I’ve always been more successful as one who “helps” as opposed to one who “leads”… which is probably why I’m very good at my “real job” of administrative assistant!

So, since I know that I will never begin a breeding program; but after retirement would have the free time to devote to properly socializing a litter of pups, I could be interested in forming a co-ownership relationship with a responsible breeder – I would not want to align myself with someone who only wants to find “more” foster homes, so they can breed “more” puppies, so they can make “more” money; rather I would like to become involved with someone who is researching pedigrees, following health testing recommendations, determining the best way to move forward to improve this magnificent breed and produce the healthiest, most conformationally correct, even tempered babies possible…

I can see this being a great opportunity for me to use my experiences and knowledge about dogs to help with an already established and respected program without actually trying to start my own business (which I don’t have the aptitude for anyway.)

So there’s another opinion from the viewpoint of someone who may like to provide a service like this someday – I’m pretty sure I’d be good at it! :)
 

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On the topic of foster homes maintaining show coat.... I fully plan to foster all future show dogs with Vacheron!!!!!!


:rofl::rofl::rofl:
HAHAHH I know Vacheron take Enzo and grow his coat for us as well :)
 

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On the topic of foster homes maintaining show coat.... I fully plan to foster all future show dogs with Vacheron!!!!!!


:rofl::rofl::rofl:
Your funny CBrand! I don't think I can handle another standard poodle in show coat. The puppy has thicker, more dense hair than his brother. He hasn't even been through coat change yet! :scared:
 

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the following is jmho… some might agree, some might disagree, but as stated it is just an opinion (and after i typed this out, i saw pp’s post about co-ownership instead of fostering… are they different????):

I think if the breeder and the foster home are both “in it” for the right reasons it can be a great idea (for many of the reasons mentioned earlier) if the breeder has so many fostered dogs that they lose track of them, or cannot adequately monitor the foster homes’ activities with said dogs, then; yes, i agree this could quickly turn into a bad situation.

I probably won’t be retiring for many years, but i’ve daydreamed about how fulfilling it would be for me to provide a safe, nurturing home in a situation like this once i’m not working my 40 hrs per week job… i truly have no desire to start a grass roots breeding program – i know how much commitment, labor, finances, dedication, blood, sweat and tears go into a reputable program… i’d like to play a part in that effort, but not be the “boss” of it (if that makes any sense…) i’ve always been more successful as one who “helps” as opposed to one who “leads”… which is probably why i’m very good at my “real job” of administrative assistant!

So, since i know that i will never begin a breeding program; but after retirement would have the free time to devote to properly socializing a litter of pups, i could be interested in forming a co-ownership relationship with a responsible breeder – i would not want to align myself with someone who only wants to find “more” foster homes, so they can breed “more” puppies, so they can make “more” money; rather i would like to become involved with someone who is researching pedigrees, following health testing recommendations, determining the best way to move forward to improve this magnificent breed and produce the healthiest, most conformationally correct, even tempered babies possible…

i can see this being a great opportunity for me to use my experiences and knowledge about dogs to help with an already established and respected program without actually trying to start my own business (which i don’t have the aptitude for anyway.)

so there’s another opinion from the viewpoint of someone who may like to provide a service like this someday – i’m pretty sure i’d be good at it! :)

omg!!! Yes you would!!!
 

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I never heard of fostering really with dogs ? maybe it's a poodle thing.

But I do know with TICA and I think CFA you can lease out your cats to other breeders. You have to fill out a form and send it in. Then the person who wants to use your cats gets to keep the cat for how long the lease was for. I found that just weird. I know some breeders either just co own or lease out so they will have more cats they can use in their breeding program
 

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Yes they are different. On a co-ownership the person who has the puppy/dog shows said dog to obtain a title/s and according to the contract made when the dog is bred to a decided upon dog/bitch the breeder has the responsibility of placing the puppies etc...in the majority of the "foster/guardian" situations the dogs are just pets whom the breeder uses to have a litter to make a profit with no showing or titling involved.

I do not like the way the term "foster" is being used I think most people call it "Guardian" homes.

Roxy I see it a lot in Poodles and "Doodles".

plumcrazy I believe some breeders offer a co-ownership on retired show dogs who they still want to use. I can see this as a good thing.
 

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Yup I've heard of leasing a bitch to someone so they can use her for a litter. I'm weird so I always think of the possible negative things that could happen when my dog was away from me in that situation. Say I lease my bitch to someone and something happens to my dog in their care? I'd be so upset that I put my dog through that. Plus that just sounds so weird to lease a dog to USE her uterus for a litter of puppies but I know it's done a lot.
 

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In the situation I was describing above, I really wouldn't want to lease a uterus... the litter wouldn't be mine, it would belong to the breeder - who would be responsible for screening buyers and placing the pups in the homes he or she felt were the right homes... I wouldn't be looking for any monetary compensation at all - just the satisfaction of helping raise a well-socialized litter of baby spoos would be reward enough for me... Maybe I'm weird that way (but I've been called worse!!) :)
 

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In the situation I was describing above, I really wouldn't want to lease a uterus... the litter wouldn't be mine, it would belong to the breeder - who would be responsible for screening buyers and placing the pups in the homes he or she felt were the right homes... I wouldn't be looking for any monetary compensation at all - just the satisfaction of helping raise a well-socialized litter of baby spoos would be reward enough for me... Maybe I'm weird that way (but I've been called worse!!) :)
I do not think that is weird at all I think it is wonderful...
Raising a litter is so rewarding but watching them leave is soooo hard :(
 
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