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An interesting study into the minds of canines.

"According to a study published today in the journal PLOS ONE, wolves appear to be more inclined than dogs to be generous with their pack mates. When given the choice, wolves deliver food to their friends, even if they don’t benefit themselves. Dogs, on the other hand, quickly lose interest in the absence of personal payoff."

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/wolves-dogs-touch-screens?utm_source=FBPAGE&utm_medium=social&utm_term=20190501&utm_content=2283205364&utm_campaign=NOVA+Next&linkId=66807601&fbclid=IwAR3N_FfKpV-kRRKgVyGzJPno1AdkEQD6_NfddngIz7b0ax5HH0czxaRrfNw
 

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Gracie will allow other dogs to eat from her bowl but would never take food to them.
 

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Our weimaraner used to gather kibble from the bowl and bring it to our other dog. Then they shared the kibble. When it was gone, April went back to the bowl and brought out some more for them to share. That's how they ate every meal for years. It was really cute. I think I have a video of it somewhere. Man, I miss that dog.
 

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I had a feral cat that used to drop dead bunnies at my feet. I really wasn’t cut out for that kind of country life.


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Tilly-cat will share prey she has caught with the dogs, mainly I think because she is not particularly hungry and the maternal instinct kicks in - she gives the little chirping call a mother cat uses to her kittens. The dogs have no concept of sharing their own food with each other, but expect humans to offer some of what they are eating, unless the humans are properly sat down to a meal when they (usually) remember that they have been taught to wait politely for their taste in the kitchen. I don't think altruism figures very highly in their mental processes - they have a well defined sense o fairness, but that is more about ensuring they get at least their rightful share than concern that one of the others is not getting enough!
 

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An interesting study into the minds of canines.

"According to a study published today in the journal PLOS ONE, wolves appear to be more inclined than dogs to be generous with their pack mates. When given the choice, wolves deliver food to their friends, even if they don’t benefit themselves. Dogs, on the other hand, quickly lose interest in the absence of personal payoff."

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/wolves-dogs-touch-screens?utm_source=FBPAGE&utm_medium=social&utm_term=20190501&utm_content=2283205364&utm_campaign=NOVA+Next&linkId=66807601&fbclid=IwAR3N_FfKpV-kRRKgVyGzJPno1AdkEQD6_NfddngIz7b0ax5HH0czxaRrfNw
Dogs, on the other hand, quickly lose interest in the absence of personal payoff."
I haven't read the article yet...will later...looks interesting but gotta run. But I'm guessing it's because that trait of selfishness is due to evolution. Dogs are also neotenic versions of wolves. So juveniles are self centered. lol. Dogs also don't need to share to survive. Wolves do. Or they'll go extinct.
 

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Okay, read that article. Very interesting. Thanks for posting. I think I'm going to give this more thought in the coming days. I think evolution where dogs are concerned especially, is so fascinating. And how it's shaped us all over the years.
 

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Okay, read that article. Very interesting. Thanks for posting. I think I'm going to give this more thought in the coming days. I think evolution where dogs are concerned especially, is so fascinating. And how it's shaped us all over the years.
My mind was a little boggled too at the end. Thinking back to pre-history AND forward into the future. I should have gone into animal psychology back in the '70s. lol
 

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Well here is my question for the study. If they used PACKMATES in wolves - did they use pack mates in dogs? I know for a fact that dogs can "share" food without any benefit to themselves. When I had Stan the Pointer (very skinny and a picky eater) and Ollie the Dalmatian (who would have eaten anything that was not nailed down and always on the pudgy side) I had to watch the two like a hawk. Ollie would scarf down his food in 2 minutes and then vey nonchalantly beg Stan to give up his - which he would do 9 out of 10 times if I was not looking! If I locked them in different rooms to eat - Stan would always save some to "give" to Ollie later. Stan was the older of the two and ruled Ollie with an iron fist. So wether they used dogs that functioned as a pack or family unit is a crucial point to this study in my opinion.
 

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I think it's rather a useless thing to compare wolves to dogs in that way. Dogs are not true pack animals. They simply are not like wolves. It's like comparing human behavior to chimpanzee behavior. Of course we don't do everything the same or uniform way.
 

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This is really interesting. It makes you wonder if domestication did rid the instinct of helping others in the pack by offering food.

And on the subject of cats, when they bring you a dead bird, rat, dead whatever and offer it to you, it’s because they are accepting you, like you and respect you.

They are offering you a gift, and if you receive it that way the behavior usually stops. They are honoring you in a way.


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Question what about the wild dogs they are in packs. I guess not wild but have no home. In Porto Rico they have poor dogs wondering around, or they did years ago when I was there, I know as I feed from the outside venders. We were there 2 weeks and I would feed them a couple timed a day. Next thing you know we would come out of the hotel, and 4 or 5 dogs would follow me, I would by more sandwiches for them
 

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Question what about the wild dogs they are in packs. I guess not wild but have no home. In Porto Rico they have poor dogs wondering around, or they did years ago when I was there, I know as I feed from the outside venders. We were there 2 weeks and I would feed them a couple timed a day. Next thing you know we would come out of the hotel, and 4 or 5 dogs would follow me, I would by more sandwiches for them
Those sound like feral dogs how you describe them. Dogs don't really live in packs per say...not in the organized sense of the term. They're usually random dogs that come to scavenge. They're not always the same dogs that scientists observe...some come and go, other appear, then leave. Scavenging animals aren't typically pack animals, as they aren't hunting large game where that organization and larger number is needed. Sometimes wild dogs are in a family...mom, pop and the kids. It happens occasionally, but is rare that they form a pack made up of many dogs. Even with wolves, it is usually a family if there's a group, not a pack of a lot of unrelated wolves. Rarely it has been observed though. The breeding pair are the parents just like with humans. So naturally, by default, the parents are the heads of the family. Here are a couple of things you might like.

https://www.funpawcare.com/2014/09/17/8-reasons-why-dogs-are-not-pack-animals/

The 'dogs are pack animals' myth | Stuff.co.nz
 

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I doubt if Buck would share, he is always trying to pretend he’s still hungry or we skipped his feeding. (As if!) With wolves, I think it’s more a matter of the adult being replete and the rest up for grabs.
 

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I think we also have to understand that a wolf is much smarter than a dog. Add to that the whole pack cares for the puppies. Dogs in a group do not do that to the extent that a wolf pack does, and may not help at all, depending on the breed and socialization of the dog.

I did read where someone's GSD dogs shared in caring for their litter. The sire went so far as to swipe a steak off the table and bring it to the dam.
 
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