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All of the food listed on the report are "better" foods. I don't think any of them can be bought in a grocery store, the owner must go to a specialty store. Tractor Supply, though not a pet specialty store, carries a few of them. This means there are many dogs that were not considered in the study.

Other than that the study does not break down all of the components of the dog foods to find a common or uncommon element. It is really a study that would be used in a broader study.

I don't understand the question.
 

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I guess my question is how to make sure I am providing my little guy with the best I can afford. Every time I read something it seems another kibble based diet is on the "don't feed list".
Isn't DCM more a golden retriever issue rather than a poodle? At least in my ignorance that was what I thought. Thank you so much for responding!
 

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They mention why goldens might be reported more than other breeds. This health concern can impact other breeds as well, though, according to current findings.

This health concern has been talked about a great deal in the food forum.
Maybe do some research there?
 

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While the reports of DCM are worrying, I think it is important to remember that they are still a tiny number, compared to the thousands of dogs eating these foods. Grain free was always a bit of a fad, in my opinion - grains have a long history of safe use in dog food, so unless your dog is intolerant there is not much point in avoiding them, especially given the correlation between large quantities of legumes and potatoes (used instead of grains in commercial foods) and an apparent increased incidence of DCM.

I do believe that there is benefit in feeding a range of different foods - that way a possible excess or inadequacy in one is balanced by the others. If you have concerns talk to your vet, but don't get overly stressed - there are people who will assure you that grains are killing your dog, that raw meat will lead to horrible illnesses, that cooking meat destroys its vital spirit, that all dogs should be vegan for the sake of the planet, that dogs should eat nothing but meat and bones, and that no one except a fully qualified dog nutritionist can possibly prepare a properly balanced diet, but most dogs live long and healthy lives, eating a very wide range of foods. I would simply buy a good quality, meat based complete food that your dog likes and you can afford, or do the necessary research and prepare one at home.
 
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I went thru the case by case file to see for myself which foods were implicated and yes, most of them were grainfree..............so until they find out why, I have elected to stay away from any kibble that has peas, legumes, or potatoes in it. If the suspect ingredient IS in it, it has to be listed at 9th or tenth and only '1' suspect ingredient in the formula! I do stay away from corn, wheat, and soy though, because they make Molly 'itchy'. There are many recipes that are okay and I rotate thru them to keep a variety in Molly's diet. Also, I do feed raw for 50% of her diet. I consider myself lucky that I have a dog with an iron tummy and I don't have to do 'transitioning' every time I change her kibble!
 

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I also find these findings troublesome since they almost only report on high quality kibble and I cannot for the life of me believe the Orijen would be worse for a dog than Beneful or Gravy Train full of slaughterhouse runoff and questionable junk. I am feeding raw for many years now and since Louie's size is so much smaller it is pre-made (which I could never afford for a standard). It is super convenient and he is very healthy. I worry about re-calls but that is the price you pay for convenience.
 
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