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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All:

I am new here and so happy to have found this community! I will be picking up my toy poodle in about four weeks and have been trying to do as much research as possible. I'm not new to owning dogs but this will be my first poodle.

With that being said I have been looking up different dog foods and from reading post I understand that just like us humans, all dogs have different food needs. Until I find out what that specific food may be I would still like to narrow down some of the best options, with input from you all.

One particular brand I have been researching that seems promising is the Just for Dogs Dog Food. Has anyone tried it? What do you think of it? Have you tried similar "homemade but not made at home" food brands?
 

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Hi and welcome!

B_t_S is right. It's not advisable to change food, especially during the hard enough transition period for a puppy. Reasons for changing sooner might be that the food isn't agreeing with the pup, or it's not a high quality food. If they're on a high quality food, doing well on it, and eating it well, there's little reason to change until your pup is probably around a year old. You might also look into rotational feeding after the pup has had time to adjust to their new life, something I do a small variation on.

I changed my boys food quickly after bringing them home because both were vomiting with diarrhea, and then just stopped eating. They were on a lesser quality food so I made the change after a couple of days of tube feeding from the vet. Things couldn't have gotten much worse in their GI tracts at that point, so we had something to gain by giving a new food.

At a minimum, look for foods that have AAFCO labels on the packaging, and veterinary nutritionists on staff who are involved in developing and testing the formulas. On that basis, this company looks promising.

Do you know what the breeder is/will be currently feeding? Some breeders even stipulate foods in their contracts or guarantees, so check on that.

Also, just checking that the breeder has gone over hypoglycemia with you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both very much! I will discuss her food with the breeder, I know he will send some of her with a little food once I get her so I will make sure to find out what this food is. I guess I am worried that I will miss something and want to make sure things are perfect I may actually be making things more difficult than they have to be,
 

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Thank you both very much! I will discuss her food with the breeder, I know he will send some of her with a little food once I get her so I will make sure to find out what this food is. I guess I am worried that I will miss something and want to make sure things are perfect I may actually be making things more difficult than they have to be,
No worries. Your vet will be your #1 best source once you have puppy in hand since they can touch and prod what we can't (Do you have a vet lined up?). We're backup or if your worried and your vets closed. Plus, your puppy will be a little resilient, so if you make some learning mistakes along the way it should be okay.

Also, with Amazon prime or your local pet store you can buy any missing thing in a pinch. So, do worry there.

You'll just kinda need the basics the first week, but you can get as prepped as you want.

Just realize it won't be perfect. Your not going to get 100% on potty training either. Barf will happen too.

Here's some recent past puppy soon threads that cover A-Z:


There's a lot of similarities and a few differences depending on if you get small, medium, or large fluff ball.

The search bar is a good tool too.

You want to read about hypoglycemia though. I don't have a toy but that's a topic that's posted a lot, so.. we're mentioning it again so it's on your radar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No worries. Your vet will be your #1 best source once you have puppy in hand since they can touch and prod what we can't (Do you have a vet lined up?). We're backup or if your worried and your vets closed. Plus, your puppy will be a little resilient, so if you make some learning mistakes along the way it should be okay.

Also, with Amazon prime or your local pet store you can buy any missing thing in a pinch. So, do worry there.

You'll just kinda need the basics the first week, but you can get as prepped as you want.

Just realize it won't be perfect. Your not going to get 100% on potty training either. Barf will happen too.

Here's some recent past puppy soon threads that cover A-Z:


There's a lot of similarities and a few differences depending on if you get small, medium, or large fluff ball.

The search bar is a good tool too.

You want to read about hypoglycemia though. I don't have a toy but that's a topic that's posted a lot, so.. we're mentioning it again so it's on your radar.
Thank you so much. I do have a vet because I have a one-year-old cat - Amethyst Marishka. I have an Amazon Kindle Unlimited subscription so I downloaded a couple of books but I have found this forum to be the best. I will read about hypoglycemia now. I have been so worried about Parvo, that I haven't even looked at anything else.

When I was growing up someone left two puppies on our porch and my parents took them in. They both had Parvo and of course, we didn't know. When I woke up the next day one of the little guys had died and the other one I watched deal with Parvo for about a week. He recuperated but that scarred me for so long that any dog I adopted since then has been over a year old. So thankfully no parvo but also no potty training, which has also been a worry of mine.

Thank you for this info and I will do my reading now.
 

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Don't worry, there will be mistakes made on both sides, but all will be forgiven :)

I'm adding the list I pulled together from member suggestions, plus a great puppy resource compiled by Liz, another PF member.

New Pup/Dog startup

Crates, Carriers, Exercise Pens, Beds/Bedding, Travel
Harnesses, Collars, Leashes
Food, Water, Bowls
Enzyme Cleaner, Pee pads, Poo bags, Paper Towels
Toys
Grooming
Health, Vet, Vaccinations Vs Socialization, Insurance, Care Credit, Emergency funds
Puppy proofing inside and out, including kitties


This is really more your basic startup info. It's taken from other threads and posts that many active members of PF has contributed to. I hope more Pfer's will add to this, comment or correct any mistakes.


Crates, Carriers, Exercise Pens, Beds/Bedding, Travel

Crates
Hard side plastic or wire is best for early days. If you choose wire, be sure there are no sharp bits, and be very sure that the door will stay fully latched with a bumptious puppy in it. It's not common but there have been some concerning reviews mentioning injuries.
No collars in the crate for safety.
Look for one with a divider in the size you expect them to grow into and use the divider to keep them comfortably cozy (stand up, turn around, sleep) til then.
Use a blanket as a crate cover.
Use a washable bath rug/towels or sherpa crate mat for bedding.
Put something leak proof on the floor of the crate or under it.
Depending on the layout of the house/apt, consider 2 crates, one for the sleeping space, one for the living space.


If you can manage it, have the pup sleep in your bedroom. They just think they're on an adventure until bedtime, especially the first night, rolls around. Suddenly they realize that NOTHING is familiar, no scent, warmth or comfort of mom or siblings. They are Alone.


Ask the breeder to do this or bring a towel or blanket to get mom and siblings scent on it, to comfort them.
Keeping them in the same room allows you to hear if they are unwell or need to go out.
Expect to have the young ones out several times during the night for a while.
Set a periodic alarm to beat them to it.


Don't count on a lot of sleep the first days or weeks. Taking a few days off from work or work from home, if you can, will really help set routines and gives some time to get to know each other. Find out if the breeder had them on a daily routine and try to follow that for a few days.
They're facing so many instant and incomprehensible changes. Keep what you can the same for a while.
Kidnapped From Planet Dog - Whole Dog Journal (whole-dog-journal.com)

Ex Pen
This expands their relaxation space but keeps them contained and out of mischief.
Food and water bowls as well as pee pads can be in that space.
Use a leak proof flooring here also.
These can be plastic or wire or even pop up soft side. (Same caution on wire construction.)


Beds and bedding
This may depend on the pups age and what they're used to. A young pup probably doesn't need one just yet. An older pup or dog may already be using one.


Carrier
These are generally only good up to about 15lbs but have their place.
A smaller crate with handles can double as a carrier.


Travel
Keeping your pup comfortable and safe in the car is important.
Depending on size and age, you might use a carrier, a crate, or a harness with seat belts.


Sleepypod brand is a highest safety rated product. Testing was done by the independent Center for Pet Safety, with some testing sponsored by Subaru.
There are a number of threads covering other brand suggestions. You can use the Search function to find them.


Harnesses, Collars and Leashes
Harnesses are usually a better safety choice for smaller pups due to potential trachea injury from collars, but it may not be the best choice for a pup who wants to pull.
Collars will carry tags and ID but don't have to be worn inside the home due to potential choking hazards.


Food, Water, Bowls
It's best to keep them on the same food as the breeder had for a while. They're already under stress from the abrupt change in their lives and this is one thing that doesn't usually need to change immediately.
They may go off their feed as it is, so keep an eye on that.
Toys are especially subject to hypoglycemia. This can very quickly become fatal. Look for the sticky on it.
If/when you want to change foods, look for foods which follow the AAFCO guidelines and companies which have a veterinary nutritionist formulating the foods.
Stainless steel or ceramic is best for their food and water bowls.
You might consider filling a bottle with the water they've been drinking at the breeders and mix it with the water at their new home, to acclimate.


Enzyme Cleaner, Pee pads, Poo bags, Paper Towels, Bitter Apple Spray
Pretty much all self explanatory.
Natures Miracle is usually recommended for enzyme cleaner.
Bitter Apple Spray is to keep them from mouthing and biting on what you don't want them to.


Toys
Have a selection of several different types on hand.
Check with your vet for safe chewing toys. They also work as trade to get your fingers back
Puzzle toys are good, and Kongs to hide kibble and treats are helpful.
Not exactly a toy, but something to consider is the Smart Pet Love Snuggle Puppy toy. This can help soothe a pup.


Grooming
I hope others will have brand specific suggestions for combs, brushes, shampoos…
Generally, a puppy shampoo with or w/o conditioner added
Greyhound comb
Pin brush with rounded tips
Slicker brush
Dryer
Grooming table or designated area
Nail trimmer or Dremel tool
It is important to get them used to the grooming process asap.
The longer you wait, the harder it is on the pup and whoever's doing the grooming.
It does not hurt their coat to get a puppy trimmed

Health, Vet, Vaccinations Vs Socialization, Insurance, Care Credit, Emergency funds
Ask if any other dog on the premises has been ill in the last week or so. Choose a vet if you don't have one and know where the ER clinic is.
Have the pup checked out by a vet within a day or two of homecoming whether the breeder requires it or not.
Puppies can socialize with vaccinated adult dogs, and probably known puppies who aren't fully vaccinated yet.
Best to stay away from paws on the ground at places a lot of dogs might be til yours is fully vaccinated.
People are not usually any risk or at risk.
Consider pet insurance, at least for the first year or two, or sign up for Care Credit if there is a health emergency.
If you can, a healthy four figure separate savings account dedicated to emergencies can be a life saver, literally.
Keep a first aid kit and learn some first aid procedures.


Puppy proofing inside and out, including kitties, bunnies, older pets
Check your fencing if there is any. You want to keep things out as well as puppy in.
Check your plant life for possible toxic plants.
Inside keep cords and cables covered or out of reach.
Be sure that kitties or other free roaming animals in the home have a safe retreat from Puppy.
Anything puppy level is at risk.



Besides pet stores, there is Amazon, Chewy.com, and eBay and Etsy for supplies. Other brick and mortar stores if they're nearby are Tuesday Morning, Marshall's, HomeGoods, Sierra Trading Post and TJ Maxx. The last two are also online.
(Apologies for the US centric shopping references, but they're what I know.

From Liz
Pandemic Puppy Primer
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Don't worry, there will be mistakes made on both sides, but all will be forgiven :)

I'm adding the list I pulled together from member suggestions, plus a great puppy resource compiled by Liz, another PF member.

New Pup/Dog startup

Crates, Carriers, Exercise Pens, Beds/Bedding, Travel
Harnesses, Collars, Leashes
Food, Water, Bowls
Enzyme Cleaner, Pee pads, Poo bags, Paper Towels
Toys
Grooming
Health, Vet, Vaccinations Vs Socialization, Insurance, Care Credit, Emergency funds
Puppy proofing inside and out, including kitties


This is really more your basic startup info. It's taken from other threads and posts that many active members of PF has contributed to. I hope more Pfer's will add to this, comment or correct any mistakes.


Crates, Carriers, Exercise Pens, Beds/Bedding, Travel

Crates
Hard side plastic or wire is best for early days. If you choose wire, be sure there are no sharp bits, and be very sure that the door will stay fully latched with a bumptious puppy in it. It's not common but there have been some concerning reviews mentioning injuries.
No collars in the crate for safety.
Look for one with a divider in the size you expect them to grow into and use the divider to keep them comfortably cozy (stand up, turn around, sleep) til then.
Use a blanket as a crate cover.
Use a washable bath rug/towels or sherpa crate mat for bedding.
Put something leak proof on the floor of the crate or under it.
Depending on the layout of the house/apt, consider 2 crates, one for the sleeping space, one for the living space.


If you can manage it, have the pup sleep in your bedroom. They just think they're on an adventure until bedtime, especially the first night, rolls around. Suddenly they realize that NOTHING is familiar, no scent, warmth or comfort of mom or siblings. They are Alone.


Ask the breeder to do this or bring a towel or blanket to get mom and siblings scent on it, to comfort them.
Keeping them in the same room allows you to hear if they are unwell or need to go out.
Expect to have the young ones out several times during the night for a while.
Set a periodic alarm to beat them to it.


Don't count on a lot of sleep the first days or weeks. Taking a few days off from work or work from home, if you can, will really help set routines and gives some time to get to know each other. Find out if the breeder had them on a daily routine and try to follow that for a few days.
They're facing so many instant and incomprehensible changes. Keep what you can the same for a while.
Kidnapped From Planet Dog - Whole Dog Journal (whole-dog-journal.com)

Ex Pen
This expands their relaxation space but keeps them contained and out of mischief.
Food and water bowls as well as pee pads can be in that space.
Use a leak proof flooring here also.
These can be plastic or wire or even pop up soft side. (Same caution on wire construction.)


Beds and bedding
This may depend on the pups age and what they're used to. A young pup probably doesn't need one just yet. An older pup or dog may already be using one.


Carrier
These are generally only good up to about 15lbs but have their place.
A smaller crate with handles can double as a carrier.


Travel
Keeping your pup comfortable and safe in the car is important.
Depending on size and age, you might use a carrier, a crate, or a harness with seat belts.


Sleepypod brand is a highest safety rated product. Testing was done by the independent Center for Pet Safety, with some testing sponsored by Subaru.
There are a number of threads covering other brand suggestions. You can use the Search function to find them.


Harnesses, Collars and Leashes
Harnesses are usually a better safety choice for smaller pups due to potential trachea injury from collars, but it may not be the best choice for a pup who wants to pull.
Collars will carry tags and ID but don't have to be worn inside the home due to potential choking hazards.


Food, Water, Bowls
It's best to keep them on the same food as the breeder had for a while. They're already under stress from the abrupt change in their lives and this is one thing that doesn't usually need to change immediately.
They may go off their feed as it is, so keep an eye on that.
Toys are especially subject to hypoglycemia. This can very quickly become fatal. Look for the sticky on it.
If/when you want to change foods, look for foods which follow the AAFCO guidelines and companies which have a veterinary nutritionist formulating the foods.
Stainless steel or ceramic is best for their food and water bowls.
You might consider filling a bottle with the water they've been drinking at the breeders and mix it with the water at their new home, to acclimate.


Enzyme Cleaner, Pee pads, Poo bags, Paper Towels, Bitter Apple Spray
Pretty much all self explanatory.
Natures Miracle is usually recommended for enzyme cleaner.
Bitter Apple Spray is to keep them from mouthing and biting on what you don't want them to.


Toys
Have a selection of several different types on hand.
Check with your vet for safe chewing toys. They also work as trade to get your fingers back
Puzzle toys are good, and Kongs to hide kibble and treats are helpful.
Not exactly a toy, but something to consider is the Smart Pet Love Snuggle Puppy toy. This can help soothe a pup.


Grooming
I hope others will have brand specific suggestions for combs, brushes, shampoos…
Generally, a puppy shampoo with or w/o conditioner added
Greyhound comb
Pin brush with rounded tips
Slicker brush
Dryer
Grooming table or designated area
Nail trimmer or Dremel tool
It is important to get them used to the grooming process asap.
The longer you wait, the harder it is on the pup and whoever's doing the grooming.
It does not hurt their coat to get a puppy trimmed

Health, Vet, Vaccinations Vs Socialization, Insurance, Care Credit, Emergency funds
Ask if any other dog on the premises has been ill in the last week or so. Choose a vet if you don't have one and know where the ER clinic is.
Have the pup checked out by a vet within a day or two of homecoming whether the breeder requires it or not.
Puppies can socialize with vaccinated adult dogs, and probably known puppies who aren't fully vaccinated yet.
Best to stay away from paws on the ground at places a lot of dogs might be til yours is fully vaccinated.
People are not usually any risk or at risk.
Consider pet insurance, at least for the first year or two, or sign up for Care Credit if there is a health emergency.
If you can, a healthy four figure separate savings account dedicated to emergencies can be a life saver, literally.
Keep a first aid kit and learn some first aid procedures.


Puppy proofing inside and out, including kitties, bunnies, older pets
Check your fencing if there is any. You want to keep things out as well as puppy in.
Check your plant life for possible toxic plants.
Inside keep cords and cables covered or out of reach.
Be sure that kitties or other free roaming animals in the home have a safe retreat from Puppy.
Anything puppy level is at risk.



Besides pet stores, there is Amazon, Chewy.com, and eBay and Etsy for supplies. Other brick and mortar stores if they're nearby are Tuesday Morning, Marshall's, HomeGoods, Sierra Trading Post and TJ Maxx. The last two are also online.
(Apologies for the US centric shopping references, but they're what I know.

From Liz
Pandemic Puppy Primer
You are amazing! I appreciate your help with this. Will you like to be Luna Rose's Faird Dog Mother? lol
 

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Thank you so much. I do have a vet because I have a one-year-old cat - Amethyst Marishka. I have an Amazon Kindle Unlimited subscription so I downloaded a couple of books but I have found this forum to be the best. I will read about hypoglycemia now. I have been so worried about Parvo, that I haven't even looked at anything else.

When I was growing up someone left two puppies on our porch and my parents took them in. They both had Parvo and of course, we didn't know. When I woke up the next day one of the little guys had died and the other one I watched deal with Parvo for about a week. He recuperated but that scarred me for so long that any dog I adopted since then has been over a year old. So thankfully no parvo but also no potty training, which has also been a worry of mine.

Thank you for this info and I will do my reading now.
Wow, that's heartbreaking. I can imagine you might feel.

Breathe. It will be okay. There's some germ stuff you'll worry need to figure out. if you haven't yet, have a gameplay to how or where's your puppy going to go pee. Not to germ phobe you, but you probably want to avoid the 3x3 patch of grass in a city where every dog pees. Your pup has some base of immunity from drinking mom's breast milk, so they have some defense. Their not completely helpless, but they're a baby.

Try your best to find the cleanest looking patch of grass that's a safe distance for the pup. They will still need to run and burn off energy, so don't avoid grass at the same time.

Summer time... Heat... You'll need water. That's a "thing" too.

Let your vet know your worried about parvovirus. Infact, ask them day 1 or even right now because you will feel relieved. Have all your questions written down and just fire them off. I loved talking to my vet lol.

You won't fail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wow, that's heartbreaking. I can imagine you might feel.

Breathe. It will be okay. There's some germ stuff you'll worry need to figure out. if you haven't yet, have a gameplay to how or where's your puppy going to go pee. Not to germ phobe you, but you probably want to avoid the 3x3 patch of grass in a city where every dog pees. Your pup has some base of immunity from drinking mom's breast milk, so they have some defense. Their not completely helpless, but they're a baby.

Try your best to find the cleanest looking patch of grass that's a safe distance for the pup. They will still need to run and burn off energy, so don't avoid grass at the same time.

Summer time... Heat... You'll need water. That's a "thing" too.

Let your vet know your worried about parvovirus. Infact, ask them day 1 or even right now because you will feel relieved. Have all your questions written down and just fire them off. I loved talking to my vet lol.

You won't fail.
Thank you so much! I really do appreciate y'all. In November we had a pretty strong hurricane that messed up part of my fence and although its been rebuilt im worried about animals that travelled through until the repairs were done on the house.

I will do exactly what you suggested regarding the vet and I will continue researching and reading on here.
 

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Hi All:

I am new here and so happy to have found this community! I will be picking up my toy poodle in about four weeks and have been trying to do as much research as possible. I'm not new to owning dogs but this will be my first poodle.

With that being said I have been looking up different dog foods and from reading post I understand that just like us humans, all dogs have different food needs. Until I find out what that specific food may be I would still like to narrow down some of the best options, with input from you all.

One particular brand I have been researching that seems promising is the Just for Dogs Dog Food. Has anyone tried it? What do you think of it? Have you tried similar "homemade but not made at home" food brands?
I messaged you
 

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Hi all,

NBC reported today on a study investigating links between diet and heart disease in dogs. The results are not conclusive, but they do point towards the direction in which follow-up research needs to go.
Original scientific article: Investigation of diets associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in dogs using foodomics analysis - Scientific Reports
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you do you know where I can find a list of foods. I have her on Farmina mini puppy abs it doesn’t seem to have these ingredients but the article also says to go with food that’s been around for decades.

Hi all,

NBC reported today on a study investigating links between diet and heart disease in dogs. The results are not conclusive, but they do point towards the direction in which follow-up research needs to go.
Original scientific article: Investigation of diets associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in dogs using foodomics analysis - Scientific Reports
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
just realize pea starch and pea fiber are both within the top two ingredients in her Farmina foos
Thank you do you know where I can find a list of foods. I have her on Farmina mini puppy abs it doesn’t seem to have these ingredients but the article also says to go with food that’s been around for decades.
 

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Thank you do you know where I can find a list of foods. I have her on Farmina mini puppy abs it doesn’t seem to have these ingredients but the article also says to go with food that’s been around for decades.
The study published in Nature has the list.
Investigation of diets associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in dogs using foodomics analysis - Scientific Reports.

It sounds to me like that at this point in the research it may just be a good idea to mix in some food with grain and some without.
 

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The study published in Nature has the list.
Investigation of diets associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in dogs using foodomics analysis - Scientific Reports.

It sounds to me like that at this point in the research it may just be a good idea to mix in some food with grain and some without.
Sorry, I was wrong. The list is in this report
16 Pet Foods Possibly Linked To Heart Disease In Dogs, FDA Reports
of the research and it includes
  • The brands most often named in the FDA’s reports were: Acana (67), Zignature (64), Taste of the Wild (53), 4Health (32), Earthborn Holistic (32), Blue Buffalo (31), Nature’s Domain (29), Fromm (24), Merrick (16), California Natural (15), Natural Balance (15), Orijen (12), Nature’s Variety (11), NutriSource (10), Nutro (10), and Rachael Ray Nutrish (10).
The authors of the research emphasize that they need to study the matter more to understand what's going on.
 

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There are several things to keep in mind about the reports from the media and the FDA's role in this.

In no particular order and with some overlapping

The FDA is not "studying" this, in the sense of going into a laboratory and researching the physical link between the food and the health issue.

They gather reports from owners and sometimes vets/clinics of "adverse events".

The reports are filed directly with the FDA and look like this:
Canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy Complaints Submitted to FDA-CVM Through April 30, 2019

When the media started headlining this info their focus was getting attention by naming only the brands, not simply the specific versions.

Also downplayed, if mentioned, that in many cases, the food was a new offering, and that the report of DCM may not have been confirmed by a medical practitioner. A number of variables weren't mentioned in those headlines and articles.

This doesn't make the issue less real or less concerning overall, but there is definitely no need to rule out entire brands due to the headlines.

The actual studies looking into the possible links and causes will be looking at what goes into the foods rather than who's manufacturing it.

Look at the results of the scientific studies to see where the true research is going and use those results as your guideline for choosing foods.

As of now, the study linked above and here Investigation of diets associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in dogs using foodomics analysis | Scientific Reports (nature.com) seems to be the most current that the media have written about.

This doesn't mean there aren't other studies. We just haven't looked lately.
 

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So, naturally, I've set off into the internet wilds. The links below are more from the FDA and have been updated to this summer. I've just glanced at some of these and there's really good, explanatory info here.

FDA Investigation into Potential Link between Certain Diets and Canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy | FDA

Questions & Answers: FDA’s Work on Potential Causes of Non-Hereditary DCM in Dogs | FDA



From KSU 2020 (referred to in above link/s)
Scientific Forum for Causes of Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Dogs | Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (ksvdl.org)
 

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So, naturally, I've set off into the internet wilds. The links below are more from the FDA and have been updated to this summer. I've just glanced at some of these and there's really good, explanatory info here.

FDA Investigation into Potential Link between Certain Diets and Canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy | FDA

Questions & Answers: FDA’s Work on Potential Causes of Non-Hereditary DCM in Dogs | FDA



From KSU 2020 (referred to in above link/s)
Scientific Forum for Causes of Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Dogs | Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (ksvdl.org)
Thanks for doing the research!
 
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