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I found this very interesting and I have to say I did much of this, but not consciously.........did you?



I couldn't get this to load...........so Google;

'More Harm Than Good: 3 Reasons Why I Never Socialize My Puppies'
 

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Interesting. The take away for me is not to force or flood the puppy, but to let it go at its own pace. I don't need total focus and engagement from my dogs - in fact I prefer them to be interested in the world around them, just as long as they will attend to me when I ask them - but I certainly focussed early work on making sure they knew I would protect them come whatever. The space between my feet was a haven from anything they found worrying, and still is on occasion. Apart from being essential to keep a very small, potentially vulnerable puppy safe it has proved a useful life lesson - if they are scared they run to me, not away.

At the same time I would hate anyone to take the author's considered approach to be an excuse not to socialise a puppy in the genuine sense - lots of small, happy experiences to build up confidence and reduce fear of the new. Like everything else it can be done well or done badly, and I do believe that done well it helps puppies (especially those with less than perfect temperaments to start with) to grow up into happy, well balanced dogs.
 

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The 'At it's own pace' is also what I took from this! I always tried to let Molly aquaint herself her surroundings at her own pace, letting her know I was there, without babying her, and not setting her up for failure! I also believe genetics play a role in behavior more than people realize, or pay attention to, when they choose a dog of any breed!
 
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That was an interesting read, but as with many such "philosophies" vs. data driven evidence I tend to fall out on the side of evidence and data. I do think much of what this blog discusses is supported by evidence, such as genetics matters (but there is more to it than that). I do also agree that the first thing to get a puppy to understand is that you are always there to support them and keep them safe, but I also think you have to let them see and engage with the world as noted at their own pace and level of comfort. At the end of that though they should always have incredible centripetal attraction for us and being willing to be focused and engaged with us.
 
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