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Hi!
So, i wrote a similar question about flea & tick prevention tips awhile ago. And seems like chewable meds are the most loved by fellow dog parents. But as i searched for the recommended product, I read that it鈥檚 not recommended for dog with history of seizure 馃槰

Welp, what can i give now? Thank you so much for writing back!
sorry i鈥檓 a newbie in this 馃様 i tried to google it but nothing shows up..
 

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The issue with seizures is with the drug Ivermectin. Many herding breeds carry a mutation called MDR1 that causes sensitivity to drugs including Ivermectin which is a common flea & tick treatment. But this mutation is not super common in poodles. You may want to speak to your vet and see what they say. There are drugs made specifically for dogs carrying the MDR1 gene that will not cause them problems. Or you may be fine with any drug as your dog likely isn't a carrier of MDR1.

But, that said, are you seeking a treatment because you're having problems with fleas and ticks? My method has always been to avoid treating if I'm not having any particular issue. My dog has never had flea and tick meds and hasn't had any difficulty with them. The few fleas he has picked up were easily dealt with by simple weekly bathing which I do anyway. Of course there are certainly areas where fleas and ticks do present a big issue.
 

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The active ingredient and the suitability of that ingredient for your species is the important factor. Ivermectin, Fipronil, S-Methoprene, fluralaner, flumethrin, and afoxolaner are just some of the compounds available for internal and/or topical use against pests. I agree that a consultation with your vet is a good idea. You live in a different locality than many of us. Brand names available to us may not be available where you live. Parasites in your area may have developed resistance to drugs that work well where I live. Dangerous unregulated or fake compounds might be found in pet shops. Your vet should know a lot about your local conditions and be able to help you sort out the information.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The issue with seizures is with the drug Ivermectin. Many herding breeds carry a mutation called MDR1 that causes sensitivity to drugs including Ivermectin which is a common flea & tick treatment. But this mutation is not super common in poodles. You may want to speak to your vet and see what they say. There are drugs made specifically for dogs carrying the MDR1 gene that will not cause them problems. Or you may be fine with any drug as your dog likely isn't a carrier of MDR1.

But, that said, are you seeking a treatment because you're having problems with fleas and ticks? My method has always been to avoid treating if I'm not having any particular issue. My dog has never had flea and tick meds and hasn't had any difficulty with them. The few fleas he has picked up were easily dealt with by simple weekly bathing which I do anyway. Of course there are certainly areas where fleas and ticks do present a big issue.
so far I鈥檝e only found 3 ticks on his body. But rainy season is starting soon. And i heard ticks & fleas will be more wild during that season.
i鈥檝e been limiting his exploration during our walkies and only letting him mark on 2 to 3 trees on our walk. Also I鈥檓 the one that choose the tree to mark. Which while he do his marking, I鈥檒l be praying very hard hoping it鈥檚 a good tree with no ticks and fleas.
This is the first time i have a dog, and this is the second year I鈥檓 in this city 馃槹 (so I鈥檓 pretty lost in both)
I鈥檓 afraid i might miss ticks when i check on his body (every time after walk & in the morning) (and i read it鈥檚 best to remove the tick as soon as possible to avoid diseases).

are tick & flea shampoo really works ?
I bath cookie once a week (recommended by our vet). I looked up online and i saw 鈥榢in and kind鈥 tick & flea prevention shampoo, and the spray thing too.
also, uh, 鈥榟artz鈥. And other brands too.
what do you usually use ?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The active ingredient and the suitability of that ingredient for your species is the important factor. Ivermectin, Fipronil, S-Methoprene, fluralaner, flumethrin, and afoxolaner are just some of the compounds available for internal and/or topical use against pests. I agree that a consultation with your vet is a good idea. You live in a different locality than many of us. Brand names available to us may not be available where you live. Parasites in your area may have developed resistance to drugs that work well where I live. Dangerous unregulated or fake compounds might be found in pet shops. Your vet should know a lot about your local conditions and be able to help you sort out the information.
yeah.. you鈥檙e right 馃槥
I鈥檒l take him to vet if I can鈥檛 find any information.
thank you for replying 馃槉
 

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In addition to the information above, flea and tick preventative products in the US that the FDA was gathering reported information are the isoxazoline class:

  • The FDA-approved drugs in this class are
    • Bravecto (fluralaner) tablets for dogs
    • Bravecto (fluralaner) topical solution for cats and dogs
    • Bravecto Plus (fluralaner and moxidectin) topical solution for cats
    • Bravecto 1-month (fluralaner) tablets for cats
    • Credelio (lotilaner) tablets for dogs and cats
    • Nexgard (afoxalaner) tablets for dogs
    • Simparica (sarolaner) tablets for dogs
    • Simparica Trio (sarolaner, moxidectin and pyrantel) tablets for dogs
    • Revolution Plus (selamectin and sarolaner) topical solution for cats

  • These products are approved for the treatment and prevention of flea infestations, and the treatment and control of tick infestations.

The products are still considered safe by the FDA for most dogs, but for dogs with a history of seizure, very definitely speak with your vet first. There were also some reports of dogs with no prior seizure/neurological history having a problem.
The FDA is not a medical research institution, they collect reports.

The side effects/adverse effects of seizure/neurological issues had not been noted on product labels so the FDA has worked with the various drug companies to ensure that information is added to those labels.

"The FDA carefully reviewed studies and other data on Bravecto, Bravecto Topical, Credelio, Nexgard, Simparica and Revolution Plus prior to approval, and these products continue to be safe and effective for the majority of animals. The agency is asking the manufacturers to make the changes to the product labeling in order to provide veterinarians and pet owners with the information they need to make treatment decisions for each pet on an individual basis. Veterinarians should use their specialized training to review their patients鈥 medical histories and determine, in consultation with pet owners, whether a product in the isoxazoline class is appropriate for the pet.

Although FDA scientists carefully evaluate an animal drug prior to approval, there is the potential for new information to emerge after marketing, when the product is used in a much larger population. In the first three years after approval, the FDA pays particularly close attention to adverse event reports, looking for any safety information that may emerge."



Definitely consult with your vet before using any flea and tick preventative, especially if your pup has had neurological issues.

So far as I know, flea and tick products that use other preventative medicines not in the class listed above are not at issue.
 
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