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Discussion Starter #1
Our almost 9 month old poodle puppy first time ever destroyed my living room while we were gone. A book, box of Kleenex, etc. He has never done this be. I want suggestions. I do not want a repeated incident. We had plans to remove the kennel because he is usually the best pup ever.
 

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This is around the age my girl had a destructive phase. Maybe a little closer to a year.

For Peggy, it only lasted a week or two, but it was intense. She destroyed toys she'd previously carried around so gently, and she destroyed them quickly and on purpose. We immediately scaled back her freedom so she wouldn't destroy anything of value, and came out the other side unscathed.

I'd just step up your puppy proofing and prevent your puppy from making mistakes. It's the kindest thing for everyone.

What size poodle do you have? If he's a standard, you're really just getting into adolescence now. Even my mini wasn't trustworthy until about 2 years old, and she still was occasionally destructive throughout her whole life. If we left, came home, and then left again was her #1 trigger.

I wouldn't personally be so quick to scrap the kennel, especially if your puppy is doing really well with it. Adolescent behaviour blips aside, there is some evidence that dogs go through a second teething phase as their adult teeth settle in their jaws. Certainly with Peggy we felt her sudden aggressive urge to chew was motivated by more than just testing boundaries.

Here's a helpful overview:


P.S. Your pup is still the best pup ever. :) You just need to be aware of where he's actually at in his development. Double down on positive reinforcement, prevent him from making mistakes whenever possible, and be patient.
 

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It's important to remember too that they're not being purposefully destructive as a human might be.
Books and Kleenex and living rooms don't have the same value to a dog as they do to a human.
The best description I ever heard to describe that difference is:
human comes home to shreds of __. Human chastises puppy. Puppy understands human is not happy but not having any way to know the value of shredded _ thinks "Oh no, I must have done that wrong. Next time I'll make smaller pieces."
 

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Dogs that have shed deciduous teeth chew a lot because the vibrations that go into their jaw pones help promote bone building to set the teeth well in place. That is the likely reason for chewing at that age.
 
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Dogs that have shed deciduous teeth chew a lot because the vibrations that go into their jaw pones help promote bone building to set the teeth well in place. That is the likely reason for chewing at that age.
I've heard the same thing. Older puppies need to chew to encourage bone growth in their jaws. The only way to keep them from chewing your prized possessions is to prevent them from having unsupervised access to your prized possessions.

Pogo and Galen (so far) seem to have satisfied much of their chewing urge by squeezing squeaky tennis balls. The down side is that my daily activities have a relentless soundtrack, squeak squeak squeak squeak squeak.

My boy Snarky did not have a tennis ball obsession and was more destructive. When he was going down for a nap he would lie in a chair with wood arms, eyes half closed, and meditatively run his jaws up and down the arm until he fell asleep.
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Once he had ruined the chair I let him continue teething on it, since it brought him such comfort. Eventually he grew out of the habit. I never disciplined him for it. He was, by nature, a somewhat insecure dog. He was a dog that could easily have gone down the path of separation anxiety and other stress triggered issues. Therefore, I wanted his interactions with people to be happy ones as much as possible.
 

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And BTW for people worried about bone density this also applies to why walking and running that put vibrations through your bones are better bone density support than swimming and cycling.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you everyone. I am so glad I found this spot last night. This pup is the best one ever. Easy to housebreak laid back. Only issue is with barking and we are working on that. So we were completely caught off guard. And was my husband mad. He went outside and left me to do the discipline. He chewed up the brand new glasses. He spent the night in kennel for the first time in months. He is still an awesome buddy. I just wanted to ensure I handled it correctly. Again, thank you. We forgot our 60 lb pup is still a puppy.
 

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Stuff happens. Lily ate a very expensive pair of glasses when she was small. BF left her loose and wasn't watching. I was out. BF had a friend over who when he saw I was back said "you won't be happy when you go into the kitchen." No I wasn't but not Lily's fault if they weren't watching her she should have been crated guys.
 
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We're happy you found us, too. :) What's your poodle's name? Do you have a picture or two to share? He sounds like a real dream.

Just be careful about how you re-establish boundaries now. "Discipline" in the human sense isn't generally very helpful with dogs. It can create anxiety, damage your relationship, and have other unforeseen consequences. So I hope that reacquainting him with his kennel was done in a positive way. A happily crate-trained dog is a wonderful thing! You definitely want to preserve those good feelings he has about going in there.

I also get cast in the "buffer" role when my husband's temper flares. But taking Peggy to training classes together has had a dramatic impact on these interactions. We're finally (mostly) on the same page about how to manage challenging moments, and it's been a real gift. Plus, he puts so much effort into training now, too. He doesn't want to do anything to jeapordize their progress.
 

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Puppies chew stuff up. You just have to either confine them to a place that only has appropriate chew toys available or you have to monitor them closely when they are not confined to a save place. It's like having a two-year-old child. Thankfully puppies grow up faster than human children.

That said, my mini poo (and lots of other dogs) is a confirmed paper shredder. She gets paper out of trash cans and shreds it into little bitty pieces. We make sure paper money and important papers are kept out of reach! Zoe is 3 years old, so she is not going to get over it. She does drop whatever she has in her mouth when I say "drop it". That's a command every dog should know - they sometimes pick up things you really want them to drop!
 

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Funny, I came to the forum today just for this! Jax turned 1year old 2 weeks ago and has been an amazing puppy, having NEVER chewed anything he should not have. And then this weekend happened! He has started chewing our coffee table and there are many tiny little teeth marks on 2 of the legs. We are so disappointed and confused as we figured maybe it was time to give him more freedom?!? Glad to see this is normal but so sad for my lovely table :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Brownie is usually 60lbs of love. He has not chewed up anything since. But has spent more time in the kennel. I miss him sleeping by the bed, but he will have to be there for awhile.
 

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Brownie is usually 60lbs of love. He has not chewed up anything since. But has spent more time in the kennel. I miss him sleeping by the bed, but he will have to be there for awhile.
What a big fluffy bear he is! Adorable.

You can put his crate by the bed. Or puppy proof the bedroom and let him sleep by the bed. Gradual transitions are my preference.
 

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As a back up/reinforcing measure have you tried the Bitter Apple spray for wood and other larger solid surfaces? It works for some dogs. My boys didn't go after furniture much but enjoyed tearing at the underliner of the sofa and loveseat. The Bitter Apple spray (no scent, just taste) removed that temptation and probably stopped them from trying the legs.
This does not replace all the good advice above but can be a tool to reinforce acceptable vs not acceptable.

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