Poodle Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
864 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Last Saturday was our first NW3 competition, having earned the NW2 title in early December. I haven't been able to get into a training class so have been practicing ad hoc with friends and alone. The rules changed in January 2020, it seems to make titling easier, but I never trialed under the old rules. I think that the main change is that you can false alert and still continue to search. A second false alert results in elimination from that element search. (I volunteered at an Elite trial last year where this was allowed.) FYI, at the NW3 level the handler isn't informed how many hides, and there can be a search area with no hides. You must call each hide that your dog finds and then Finish when they have cleared the search area. You don't find out how you've done until the judge's de-brief at the end of the day.

There were 6 searches, meaning two search areas for two of the elements, interiors and exteriors, and one area each for vehicles and containers. There was one blank area, one of the interiors, with no hides.

Overall I was happy with my dogs performance. A couple of positives: (1) He started strong, faded, and then came back later in the day. It's difficult for me to retain my energy level all day and so I was glad to be able to pump him up again even after a few stumbles. This was a long day, 9 am walk-through and ending at 5 pm, with both handlers and dogs staying in their vehicles between searches. (2) Another dog peed in an exterior search area and my intact male didn't mark on top of it. There was snow on the ground so it was easy to see, and when I thought he was thinking too hard I corrected him, and he left it alone. The judge gave me a compliment on the score card for the correction. Overall, the exterior search areas were much more complex than NW2.

We ended up with 2 clean elements, 1 element where we ran out of time but found the hides (I didn't hear the 30 second warning or I would have called Finished), and 3 NQs. It was easy for me to be relaxed because NW3 is so difficult that I wasn't expecting to qualify. It was fun, an enjoyable day out with my boy, and I'm looking forward to next time. It's difficult to get into a trial (I'm wait-listed for 4 other NW3 trials) so we could be at this level for a long time, but I'm committed to making it fun. Attached is a photo of one of the interior search areas where we found the hides within the time limit.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,896 Posts
I’m so impressed and a little jealous. They have no trials in my area and I know just to get in a trial is a lottery so it’s a pain to get into a trial. When they have trials here I will apply, but I’m not into traveling a distance. Crating from your car is hard especially when the weather is miserable because there is no inside space to go to warm up or cool off. And it is a long day to keep both you and your dogs energy up and focused on working.

This venue is hard, you can’t fail any search, all searches on that long day have to pass to get your title. I write this so people read this are aware how difficult this is to achieve.

I applaud you both for a wonderful attempt and hope one day to follow in your footsteps.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,586 Posts
Wow I am impressed. That all sounds way more complicated than anything I do in obedience and rally.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,171 Posts
I am impressed. The more I learn about nosework the more amazed I am. Wow! That sounds complex and intense. Congratulations on doing so well. And here I am as an obedience competitor being pleased when Noelle finds the right scent on a dumbbell we both can see. Nosework teams blow my mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,133 Posts
That’s great that you do this, it does sound very challenging. I’m interested to hear more about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
864 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
You might be surprised (or not) that most of the training is for handlers. After all, sniffing is part of every dog’s job description. It’s the handler’s job to note the wind direction, cover the search area, and observe their dog’s unique behavior, say, for odor versus pee. We also have to establish a search pattern, and then know when odor trumps the pattern. And lastly, but most important, to remember that it’s a game we get to play with our best friend so make sure to HAVE FUN!

FYI, treats are allowed in nosework, as is talking to and petting your dog. We’re asking for a behavior that’s innate and rewarding them for it. It’s a great sport for older dogs that are retired from activities like agility. NACSW developed nosework for shelter dogs, hence, the crating of dogs in cars. No problem with having a reactive dog as hosts go to lengths to keep dogs apart.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top