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Discussion Starter #22
In another thread this week it was noted that a dog belonging to a neighbor of one of our members died apparently from rat poison.

As was noted by Eric, vitamin K is an antidote to rat poison. Rat and mouse poisons have warfarin (heparin) as their active ingredient. Warfarin is an anticoagulant that interferes with vitamin K synthesis, so supplementing with vitamin K will be effective if given early enough. Here is a link to an article about this matter.

Anticoagulant Poisoning in Dogs | petMD
 

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Glad to hear she is OK! Very useful information too! I'm sure that there are many people who would have been at the vets office with an astronomical bill..! Two paws up to you!
 

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benadryl dose for insect stings

1 mg/lb of dog's body weight.

If using liqui-gel caps then think about trying to squirt under the tongue to get the most rapid absorption.

If insect stinger is embedded at bite site, be careful removing it not to inject more venom. Don't squeeze venom sack.

Be aware that anaphylactic sensitization can occur at any time. This is an urgent scenario. Give benadryl before trying to get to vet. If it is known that the dog has an anaphylactic allergy to anything ask vet for an epi pen. Anaphylaxis leaves you only minutes to act.
 
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Muzzles for injured dogs

At the trial I was at in July I was talking with a friend (who has spoos) and another woman who she knows well (who has GSD, one of which is a Schutzhund trained dog). We were discussing issues related to injuries. The woman with the GSD said that one of her past dogs would bite if he was in pain or felt threatened so she now trains all of her dogs to accept a muzzle. My spoo friend said she does the same thing with her dogs, so I decided it would we worth while to train my dogs also to accept muzzles. I ordered 3 muzzles (https://www.chewy.com/dog/baskerville-ultra-dog-muzzle-size-4/dp/117373?gclid=CNC0mJru4c4CFUFkhgodaawMZw) in the correct sizes for them and have been carefully following the instructions for having the dogs accepting them. I think it is well worth teaching a dog to accept a muzzle so it can be safely handled by vets and staff at times when they are in pain and unpredictable.

You can also muzzle a dog using using gauze or fabric as described here. How To Make A Dog Muzzle Out Of Gauze Or Fabric - Dogtime Or you can use a leash as shown in the YouTube video linked here.

It is important to think these things through and if needs be practice in advance.
 

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ASPCA Animal Poison Center 1-800-548-2423

Here is a great resource: ASPCA Animal Poison Center 1-800-548-2423 I called them when a friend's dog ate an 18 or 20-day supply of my dog's medicine. The poison center charges $65, payable over the phone on a credit card. They will then get all of the details about your emergency, investigate (including speaking to vets if necessary) and let you know what to do. They are also available for follow up questions from you or your vet. In our case, they recommended inducing vomiting and told us how to do it. By inducing vomiting at home, we didn't have to wait until we got to the hospital to clear out the dog's stomach. That meant we saved 40 minutes. After the vomiting, the poison center told us to go to the closest vet hospital. They told us what treatment would be necessary at the hospital. It was reassuring to have the poison center's assessment in addition to the vet hospital's assessment. The information we got may have saved my friend's dog's life. It was certainly worth every penny of the $65 charge.

Also, I'd recommend that you know the name, address, phone and driving directions for the nearest 24-hour vet hospital.
 

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Thanks for carrying this information over here!

For those who travel with dogs for trials be aware that there is always an emergency vet contact listed in the trial premium and judging program and/or catalog. I had to use one of those vets during the summer of 2015. They were great.
 
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Thank you Lily for this great thread. So glad it has been put in with the permanent stickie links.

The husky site about swallowed objects is really good and had some unexpected suggestions (Petroleum jelly sandwich ?!)

That link also said "Note: Actual Pepto Bismol should not be given to dogs as it contains salicylate (Aspirin). "
 

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Good post! I don't have a first aid kit per se but I do have all the necessities in my home, at least 2, one upstair and one down and its all kept in bathroom sink so easily available. One time I had a min schnauzer that ate a childs sock, my vet was 5 min up the road and met us there, gave her a shot and up it came. Y
 
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