Poodle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,864 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am starting this thread because I had to administer emergency care to Lily this morning. She is fine! What happened today though made me think it could be a good idea to collect everybody's knowledge of dog emergency care in one place.

What happened this morning was that Lily managed to get into a bag of garbage I had taken out from under the kitchen sink last night. I was cooking when I pulled it so I just left it by the back door. This morning she and Peeves were in the yard by themselves. I did not realize that BF had left them out and that the garbage was still by the door. Lily ate all sorts of awful stuff out of the bag--the absorbent things they put in the bottom of meat trays, used napkins and paper towels, etc., all coated with coffee grounds.

Since I knew that she hadn't eaten anything caustic or any sharp bone scraps or the like here is what I did. I took her outside and made her drink hydrogen peroxide. This will make the dog vomit. The goal is to keep them vomiting until all that comes up is foamy clear liquid. Lily brought up all that she had taken out of the garbage plus her breakfast.

You should not induce vomiting if the dog may have ingested something caustic or sharp that could catch in the esophagus on the way up. It will not be helpful unless you catch the dog right after they eat the junk they got into. You have to do it before they can absorb any toxins out of what they ate.

If a dog eats something that is not digestible and you are concerned could cause an obstruction (like a sock) then you should feed them something like oatmeal (high fiber to increase intestinal motility) and try to get lots of water into them to keep things moving through them as fast as possible. Monitor their bowel movements for "delivery" of the eaten object.

You can perform the Heimlich maneuver on dogs that are choking. See the attached file for instructions. You can also give cpr to a dog that is not breathing. The easiest way to do this for a large dog (I think) is to keep their mouths well closed and breath into their nostrils. Make sure their airway is clear before you start.

I keep a first aid kit in my car for emergencies when I travel to shows. Thankfully I have never used any of it for me or Lily. It has a bottle of hydrogen peroxide (for the purpose I used it for today), disinfectant wash, an assortment of sterile gauze pads, topical antibiotics, and a couple of rolls of vet wrap and an elastic bandage. Do you all have pet first aid kits? What do you keep in them?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
482 Posts
Glad Lily is OK. Thanks for posting this information and starting this thread, although I hope I won't need to use it anytime soon.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lily cd re

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
I have a first aid kit for humans that I mostly use on my dogs. I have bandages, gauze, peroxide, cotton swabs, scissors, alchohol prep pads, triple antibiotic, and betadine.

I've only needed it to clean and bandage up injured paws. It would also be good to have peptobismol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,610 Posts
One thing I always, always carry is benadryl. I keep some in my purse and some in my show bag. I've seen too many dogs stung in the face during the spring when bees become active. Since they must sniff until they find the perfect place to potty it doesn't really surprise me lol. The one time I really needed it and didn't have it was for myself at an agility trial. Fortunately someone else had some. Who would have figured I was allergic to camels? :confused:

Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
I keep the kind of things I would have in a first aid kit for us plus Benadryl, hydrogen peroxide and Gas X in case of bloat. The one thing I do need to do, which is something I did when ds was small is have a poison control number and instructions for say dosage of peroxide, Benadryl and Gas X for Lexi's size and put them on the inside door of a cabinet. It would beat having to Google something in an emergency.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,864 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the idea of benadryl and Gas-X poolann and katbrat. Vicki 2200 also thanks for adding peptobismol to the list.

Lou with the hydrogen peroxide you are supposed to keep giving it to them in small amounts until they are only bringing up clear foam. A friend of mine had to do this with her labradoodle a couple of years ago after she got into the halloween candy. They poured a couple of ounces at a time down a turkey baster tube to get it into her. I just held Lily's mouth open and poured and watched to see she swallowed a couple of times. She started to heave almost instantly and then brought up stomach contents about 3-5 minutes later. Once she stopped vomiting I only had to give her one more round until she was clear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
I would definitely recommending having a turkey baster on hand for this purpose. When I had to do this for Max I did not have one and I used a baby medicine syringe and you just cannot give enough in one shot. We hydrogen peroxide he may cooperate the first time but will fight you after the first dose. Also make sure that your hydrogen peroxide is fresh otherwise it will not work.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,864 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Specman you are so right about the turkey baster. I would have had a really hard time getting more peroxide into Lily if I needed to. Thankfully I only needed to give her one shot to get her cleaned out. And yes, the peroxide does need to be fresh, but it is cheap to buy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,864 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Alternatives to styptic powder if you quick a nail.

Alternatives to styptic powder if you quick a nail.

Corn starch
Wheat flour
Fine potting soil
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,864 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Keeping one's head clear is one of the keys to success, isn't it? I was on the brink of panicking Saturday when Lily was sick. Being far from home didn't help matters.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mfmst

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
This topic is so informative. My Delilah's brother's owner had a similar post on Facebook and someone mentioned having Vetrap on hand as well. It is very useful for both canine and human need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,286 Posts
It is a fabulous idea to share this information and ideas with other forum members. Might even save a life some day.

Catherine, I am sorry you are going through all this with Lilly right now, especially with a new pup on board. You have my admiration for all you do for your firkids and for sharing your "adventures" with the rest of us so we can benefit from your experiences. Thank you and I hope your dear Lilly gets well soon. I know how important she is to you.

In addition to all of the above mentioned necessities I include a zip lock bag of disposable gloves, a travel packet of baby wipes for tidying up, a packet of clorox wipes, a small zip lock bag of round cotton makeup pads and/or cotton balls, hemostats are good for many things but very useful to crush sticker burrs in fur making them easier to remove, a bottle of sterile saline solution (from the eye care section of your local discount store - use to wash wounds or flush eyes....make sure you get the kind that is preservative free. There are baby socks which fit my dog's feet so that I can encase the foot and tape the sock in place. We had to do that for a pad injury once. The socks have the rubber grip dots on the bottom for traction. I also include a small slicker brush and comb. You might include a soft muzzle as well. Keeps you from getting bitten if your dog is in severe pain and needs to be picked up. Our local feed store/farm and ranch store and veterinary supply store all carry syringes of verious sizes. I have medium sizes for the peroxide and/or medicine dosing and a very large one that can be used for flushing wounds.

I also calculated dose of the various OTC meds based on my dog's weight, then on a 4x6 index card made a list of the meds and next to each one put the calculated dose....that way it's all in one place when needed. On that card I included contact information for a trusted friend who knows my dog and contact info for my local veterinarian. In an emergency where I might be incapacitated I want someone to be able to contact my vet and/or an alternate care giver. I laminated the info card to protect the onfo from moisture. I have a plastic tote bin with a handle on it and all my first aid stuff lives there. It is in my master bedroom closet, near the bath. I have grabbed it up and taken it to a friend's house to aid with a doggie emergency or two so it helps to have things handy in one place.

I happen to have a food vacuum sealer. I made up medicine packets for each of the over the counter medicines in my aid kit. That way they are vacuum sealed and protected from moisture so they last longer. I labeled each packet with the medicine name and proper dose per pound wt. of dog, then dated the packet so I would know how old it is. I know, I get carried away with all this organizing stuff.

Great idea for sharing with each other....thanks again! Viking Queen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,997 Posts
I seem to have some of all the above posters items also. Working at a Vet for so long taught me all the er thing to keep in stock (vetrap, gauze squares, 6in q-tips, antibiotic ointments are big ones) I keep all of it in a large grooming bag in my closet. The bag has a ton of pockets and elastics to hold everything separate so you can find an item in an flash. I also keep copies of vet records, registration papers and microchip information in the bag for each dog. So if in case of a fire or evacuation of any reason I can just grab the bag and we are on our way. (I also keep bottled water and about a weeks worth of food aside for the same reasons, but I know we are talking medical emergencies here) Great thread! Keep the ideas coming guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
What to put on wasp and bee stings as one is acid and one alkali. Its better to do nothing if you don't know what they were stung by as the wrong treatment can make it worse

Wasp sting bathe area with vinegar
Bee sting make a paste of baking soda or bicarb

I always remember which is which by having false german accent Vinegar for Vasps. Also important if its the first time they've been stung to see your vet asap as they can go into anaphylactic shock since the dose of poison on a small dog is far greater than the effect on a human.

Antihistamine dose hope this shows up ok


Tom O tick for removing ticks.

Magnifying glass for looking for thorns and splinters.

Phone number of your vet on your mobile in case you have accident while out to notify them you are on your way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,864 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I was just having a discussion in PMs with someone about bloat and thought it would be good to update here with information of bloat first aid. Here is a link to a pamphlet written by a veterinarian about emergency care for a bloating dog. It is old, but I think still good and it was high on the list of returns on my Google search. If anyone has an update on any of the things mentioned here, please add it.

http://www.bakerbaynewfoundlands.com/Para_VetBloatBook.pdf
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top