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Greetings to everyone, sadly I am not technologically efficient, and could not figure out how to post, or even introduce myself. I live on the Caribbean coast of Mexico, Playa del Carmen, am retired, and after recently losing my beloved Don Cicco, a mexican mini-toy, I decided to import a pup from the US. I signed up for this forum to learn beforehand, afterhand, and now with a mini nine months old am completely lost... my last dog was an easy puppy... maybe too easy. My new pup, wonderfully bred, absolutely gorgeous, and with a good temperament, has me looking for a new home. I got what I asked for: I figured a more active pup, with a bit more drive would get me out and about more, but I am unable to keep up with his needs for exercise... at eight months he knows many commands and tricks, gives good waits for everything, but is just too "inquieto" like we say here in MX. Everything stimulates him, he has unbelievable drive, which I am not able, probably because of my age, to direct appropriately. Unless he is sleeping, he is on the go... I am not a novice, have socialized him with other dogs and lots of folks, but sadly he can not contain the emotion or excitement. He seems to be going through a hormone push at the moment, and it seems he is peaking in terms of height (16 and 1/2 inches). Am really at a loss, because it is becoming more of a pain than a pleasure. He does suffer from sep anxiety when left alone, and always looks to make sure either I or my wife are around... he walks well on a halter with a loose leash, except for the times he sees or senses something different (dog, person, bird)/// his desire to meet just overwhelms him. I need some direction... I am looking hard at a more laid back pup, which is what i should have requested in the first place... Mexico is not a place with puppy schools, behaviorists, qualified trainers, assortments of goodies and foods like in the states... so I am pretty much on my own. Is nine months old too soon to pass judgement and try again? Thanks in advance, and yes, part of the exercise problem is the intense heat and humidity all year round... I might be better off with a pup I can tire inside the house... thanks again, James (owner of Nikolo)
 

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Nine months old can be a very difficult age since hormones are rising and the pup has the rebellious streaks of teenage humans. there are great ways to tire such a pup out without walking to the moon and back though. Teach tricks, use puzzle toys and do other sorts of "brain" games to help deepen his willingness to please you and most of the other problems should sort themselves out.


While poodles are very smart this does not necessarily equate to being easy puppies to raise. My girl Lily (soon to be eleven) was a wild child and a really terribly difficult to manage puppy for her first year. On the other hand my boy Javelin (now four) was super easy as a pup. They run the range from easy as sliced bread to like wrestling with hyenas.
 

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Hola. At nine months Asta was a mess - rebellious teenager for sure. I wouldn't give up just yet. I had Asta neutered at 1 1/2 years per advice on this forum. It really calmed him down. Know what you mean about heat and humidity - Monday it is going to be 99% here. I try to keep Asta in out of the heat and use a lot of games (training really) and play with him with his toys.
 

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Being a senior and also disabled I feel your pain! I felt so guilty for not being able to let my girl live up to her potential when she was younger! But with a little imagination and the internet I got over it LOL! There are soooooo many things you can do to engage your dog in fun stuff that will bring all that energy to a level you can live with! Google is your friend..........Google 'Indoor games for dogs' you'll find a lot of fun things from scent games to jumping thru hula hoops to playing Hide n Seek with your dog........and Lily is right about brain games, they will tire a dog as much as a run around the block!
I also found that my girl settled down with an excellent 'off switch' by the time she turned 2 years old!
 

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I have a 3 yr old standard poodle, Poppy. For a very long time Poppy did not have an "off switch" and she really exhausted me. No amount of exercise ever tired her out. The more exercise I gave her to try to tire her out, the more active she became.

Then I found a training exercise which helped tremendously. It teaches the dog to settle on their own and how to relax. It made my Poppy into a very different puppy.

If you follow the directions exactly as given, in a very short amount of time you will have a much more manageable and happy puppy.

http://www.dogsandbabieslearning.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Relax_on_a_mat.pdf
 

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Greetings from Mexico cont..

Thank you so much for the rapid responses, and for the empathy as well... I sometimes feel at a loss: I have living in MX for the past 20 years, my wife is from the city of Durango. We spent most of those years in the state of Jalisco, in the countryside: no internet, no phone service, no tv: life could not have been better, lol! Since returning to "civilization", I have had a hard time decifering much of the advice given here: there are no such things as e collars, prong collars, 300 varieties of foods, vitamins, and more especially, training assistance... we have had 2 GSDs and our beloved, and gone, Don Cicco. The trainers focus on Malinois and protection services, some for obedience and agility... the only tools are treats and choke chains... while choke chains have their place when used correctly, I have avoided the trainers like the plague... the only observations made for me were "still a puppy", and all are in agreement that he is a high energy dog... super drive with either food or toys, but really high energy...
I will follow the advice and tools given: one final question: is it normal for the pup to LOVE to follow commands, wait for the door, wait for food or treats, get up on boxes, roll on his back, have a good 5 minute stay, and at the same time being a wild child who jumps at every occasion and still nips (more recently)... grabs onto the legs and arms, responds to a corrections with teeth bared (no growling) kind of like ha, ha, you can not do anything to me? One other sign is his somewhat lack of attachment and attachment: screams when left alone, does not tolerate much affectionate touching, distracted by every movement... most significant, I believe is his willingness to fetch, return with the item, but refuse to give it up... wants to fight... any other help is greatly appreciated... I just came back from morning walk saturated from the humidity... I have to get his excercise outdoors done BEFORE 7 am or we are both toast. Thanx in advance, and if anyone plans on vacationing on the Mayan Riviera we would be thrilled to meet fellow enthusiasts... james
 

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I love your comparisons... sliced bread and wresting hyenas... my wife (mexican sense of humor) compares it to herding cats... love your sense of humor.
 

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Oh but herding cats truly is an impossible task! I love that expression too. Hang in there I think you can get through the adolescence and have a nicer adult than you can envision right now. Lily (the wild child) is a wonderful adult who I often use as a neutral dog for CGC tests and for training dog reactive dogs. She's the one in my siggy pic who has all of the titles.
 

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Welcome James. Honestly, I haven't had a puppy in 8 years, and I never had a pure bred poodle puppy. One thing I do remember about the 4 puppies (all poodle mixes) I have had in my life is how energetic they were. I also have a rescue (poodle or poodle mix) right now that is 7, in really good health, and there are times she doesn't have an off switch.

Now that you have posted in the welcome area, I would encourage you to post in the training subforum to seek more advice. I believe more people read those threads than the welcome threads and you will get some more good advice.
 

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Wellcome to the forum. I also have a wild child but he is calming now at almost age 2. We still have moments. My boy is a standard. I had him neutered at 13 months. That has helped a little. I have followed some of the free videos on the internet. https://susangarrettdogagility.com/2018/06/why-choice-is-the-critical-key-to-a-great-dog/
When I play this game with my dog I just sit and calmly hold treats in my closed hand on my lap. I say nothing I don't wave it around I just sit. When he backs away I open my hand and if he lunges for it, my hand closes. He leans very quickly to just back wy and sit and at that point I take a treat from my hand and give it to him. I also do the mat game that has already been mentioned. I started that by just putting a small piece of carpet down and whenever he stepped on it, I said good boy! and gave him a treat while on it. He learned to go to the mat and just sit there and wait till I give him a treat. It also teaches you how to release him from the mat, which I did very quickly in the beginning so quick he was just realizing mat+tret, free means a treat is thrown off the mat. So now he knows mat =treat, Free means go do what you want. You can make sa puzzle to occupy him if you cannot purchase. https://www.hallmarkchannel.com/home-and-family/how-to/diy-treat-dispenser-game-for-pets-with-laura-nativo Just take an empty plastic jug and put a few treats or his dry kibble in it and make a stand that it can hang from so he can toss it around and knock the treats out of. I had to keep my boy on a leash for a long time both indoors and out just to keep him from jumping up on things. I also have used a empty coke can with 13 pennies in it, taped very well shut so pennies cannot fall out. And when behavior bd I would throw it near to him, always trying to be sure he didn't realize it came from but it was an immediate deterrent from his behavior. I also use a 20 ft long leash to work on recall with him. He learned to bring a ball back to me so I could throw it again. He would get a treat when he dropped it. You can use small bits of meat, like chicken. You can make your own treats for him when they are not readily available. I have heard that mini are the most active of all sizes of poodles. My guy really is calming down and I don't have to walk him any distance. He gets tired trying to figure out what the heck I want him to do. Once a day though I take him to our fenced in yard and just toss the ball with him. Sometimes I take two, so once he brings one back or if he doesn't I throw the next one and he is off after it. I keep repeating and wishing 45 minutes he is through or I am, then I let him in the house with the ball He will usually get a drink, play a little with the ball and collapse. I hope things settle down for you soon.
 
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