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Fenris (spoo), Sushi (old grumpy cat)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my vet did a genetic test (not Embark) that is apparently thrown in their new puppy bundle I paid for. He's apparently not at risk for all the 159 genetic issues they tested, so yay. But I'm looking at the coat results and I am not sure what I am seeing. Maybe you guys can help me decipher these...

BASE PIGMENT COLOR
Genotype: B/B
Fenris carries the gene for the 'expression' of black pigment. This means that even though their overall coat color may not be black, they are still able to make black pigment. They will also likely have black around their eyes, a black nose, and may even have black pads on their feet.

COAT COLOR MAIN POSSIBILITIES
Genotype: at/a Em/e KB/KB, KB/kbr, kbr/kbr I/wt
Fenris appears to be mostly dark in color (either black or brown). Either that or they'll have 'tiger' striping (called 'brindle'). They also have the gene for a 'mask' pattern on their face - as it's for dark hair, you may not be able to see any tan coloring there, and a dark-colored 'saddle' pattern on their back. (Did you know the dominant 'mask' gene can result in any size of mask, from a little dark fur on the lip to covering the entire face?)

COAT COLOR SUBTYPES
Genotype: at/a m/m h/h S/sp
Fenris carries one copy of the gene for white spotting so might have a fair bit of white in their coat. (Did you know white is not a color but a lack of pigment which acts to cover up a dog's natural base color?)

COAT LENGTH AND TYPE
Genotype: TT TT
Fenris's coat is probably wiry and curly. Did you know this is because they show two copies of the gene for curl? If they'd shown one, their coat would be long and wavy.
 

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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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Wow, there's a lot of information here! I'm not used to seeing it presented in this way, and I'd need to take some time modeling it in a way that's more intuitive for me. I suspect that some of these genes aren't discussed often in poodle conversations because poodles are homozygous at that locus (e.g. T for coat length/type) so there's no variation.

Even though this isn't an Embark test, Embark may be the best place to start.
 

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Fenris (spoo), Sushi (old grumpy cat)
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow, there's a lot of information here! I'm not used to seeing it presented in this way, and I'd need to take some time modeling it in a way that's more intuitive for me. I suspect that some of these genes aren't discussed often in poodle conversations because poodles are homozygous at that locus (e.g. T for coat length/type) so there's no variation.

Even though this isn't an Embark test, Embark may be the best place to start.
Thanks! I ended up googling everything and it was confusing even there. I asked on a FB group and got that he has recessive red and parti based on that. The red makes sense since he has a rusty tinge beginning to appear in a few places (I think eventually he may clear to blue like his sire). I'll check out the link too, thanks! Genetics is way more complicated than biology class in high school presented it as, lol.
 

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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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No doubt! It's difficult to read because they're not giving you the loci, so you're having to work backward from the allele abbreviations - which aren't always standardized. I think if you start off with a tree, and start placing his allele's there, it'll start making sense, and then you can figure out how the other genes operate.

It's a wealth of information, and you'll have a masters in genetics when you figure out what it means!
 

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Fenris (spoo), Sushi (old grumpy cat)
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No doubt! It's difficult to read because they're not giving you the loci, so you're having to work backward from the allele abbreviations - which aren't always standardized. I think if you start off with a tree, and start placing his allele's there, it'll start making sense, and then you can figure out how the other genes operate.

It's a wealth of information, and you'll have a masters in genetics when you figure out what it means!
Thant's it! I googled the abbreviations but got conflicting results, couldn't find others at all. I tried matching them to the loci I read about and could match some but not others. And their explanations are bs, it's the most general thing that really doesn't answer any questions I had. Congrats, my poodle is a pure bred standard with long legs, curly fur/hair, floppy ears, and he has dominant black pigmentation. Wow, really? I'm shocked.

But at least they didn't find any at risks for any genetic stuff they tested for so I'm happy.
 
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