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Discussion Starter #21
Zoe (11 lb mini poo) humps Opal (60 lb Labrador) daily to remind Opal who is boss around here. It's pretty funny due to the extreme size difference.
Oooh Zoe is a little boss 馃槀. I鈥檓 shocked that with Opal being so big she would allow that.


You're going to need a Hump Police t-shirt, I think!

Just remember: If Bella gets your attention every time she humps Paris.... Well, you can see where that might go, right? So proceed with caution. ;)

Being the extreme mommy鈥檚 girl that she is she does not like negative attention 馃槄. She gets sad and goes under the bed for a while. But I鈥檒l definitely keep an eye out to see if it becomes attention seeking behaviour.
 

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BellasMomZ, there's an old saying that goes: It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog. Over many years of having multiple house dogs, I have frequently had a small dog who ruled the roost. One of the most interesting was a female whippet who had such an enlarged heart that she could only eat very small amounts of food, so she was very, very skinny. Her ribs, backbone, and hips protruded. She was so skinny that I usually had a dog sweater on her to ward off rude comments. That old whippet would show just the tip of a canine tooth and the other house dogs would toe the line. She was a funny old girl - lived to age 15 in spite of her condition.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
BellasMomZ, there's an old saying that goes: It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog. Over many years of having multiple house dogs, I have frequently had a small dog who ruled the roost. One of the most interesting was a female whippet who had such an enlarged heart that she could only eat very small amounts of food, so she was very, very skinny. Her ribs, backbone, and hips protruded. She was so skinny that I usually had a dog sweater on her to ward off rude comments. That old whippet would show just the tip of a canine tooth and the other house dogs would toe the line. She was a funny old girl - lived to age 15 in spite of her condition.
So nice to hear that she lived so long. Sounds like she was definitely the head hen in the roost 馃槀. I鈥檓 certainly interested to see his this goes with Bella and Paris. I have a feeling they鈥檒l be fighting for that spot for as long as they live.
 

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I honestly don't think I understand why you think it needs to stop. If the humpee is not happy they will tell the other dog to knock it off. Once Javelin reached sexual maturity it so happened that Lily had a UTI so she smelled unusual to him and he thought her scent meant she would be receptive to his efforts. He approached her while we were all lying on the bed. She was involved with a stuffed toy. He was hovering over her not sure what to do since she din't get up or flag him in anyway. I thought about "rescuing" him from what I knew was coming, but didn't since I knew she would tell him with much more clarity than I could convery that he shouldn't try anymore. She whipped around and gave him her most reactive corrective snarly face and immediately went back to her toy and he jumped off the bed utterly flabbergasted. He has never tried to mount her again in the subsequent 4 years.
 

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I honestly don't think I understand why you think it needs to stop. If the humpee is not happy they will tell the other dog to knock it off. Once Javelin reached sexual maturity it so happened that Lily had a UTI so she smelled unusual to him and he thought her scent meant she would be receptive to his efforts. He approached her while we were all lying on the bed. She was involved with a stuffed toy. He was hovering over her not sure what to do since she din't get up or flag him in anyway. I thought about "rescuing" him from what I knew was coming, but didn't since I knew she would tell him with much more clarity than I could convery that he shouldn't try anymore. She whipped around and gave him her most reactive corrective snarly face and immediately went back to her toy and he jumped off the bed utterly flabbergasted. He has never tried to mount her again in the subsequent 4 years.

He鈥檚 a quick learner. Paris is a sweet girl but we鈥檝e noticed she has a bit of a temper (with Bella) and occasionally is aggressive when it comes to toys and playing. Although she fights off Bella most times when she tries to mount, I鈥檇 rather not foster behaviours that result in her being reactive since we wouldn鈥檛 want that reactivity to be further developed n the future.

I can鈥檛 correct her for defending herself; but it鈥檚 translating into other things between them. So I鈥檓 just trying to do what I think is best 馃槱
 

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Oh I get it then, but remember micromanaging such relationships is nearly impossible since you can't realistically (but must) manage every bit of their relationship. Our two males have issues that we won't leave the consequences of to chance, so unless closely supervised they are always on either side of a gate or one is inside and the other is outside since we like to relax and not to micromanage every little thing. It doesn't sound like they want to kill each other (and I know people who have kept multiple dog homes where this was the case), but when I have clients where the dogs are red zone with each other that some dogs just need to be only dogs in their homes.
 

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Haha my standard poodles never did it but the older sister Blue used to occasionally jump on her younger sister's shoulder and bark bossily at her, but the female (spayed) Bostons do it all the time.

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I honestly don't think I understand why you think it needs to stop. If the humpee is not happy they will tell the other dog to knock it off. Once Javelin reached sexual maturity it so happened that Lily had a UTI so she smelled unusual to him and he thought her scent meant she would be receptive to his efforts. He approached her while we were all lying on the bed. She was involved with a stuffed toy. He was hovering over her not sure what to do since she din't get up or flag him in anyway. I thought about "rescuing" him from what I knew was coming, but didn't since I knew she would tell him with much more clarity than I could convery that he shouldn't try anymore. She whipped around and gave him her most reactive corrective snarly face and immediately went back to her toy and he jumped off the bed utterly flabbergasted. He has never tried to mount her again in the subsequent 4 years.
Javelin is no fool! I can just see that happening since I have met them both. Lily takes no prisoners!
 

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I really like that Whole Dog Journal Training article. "The longer your dog has practiced his mounting behavior, the harder it will be to change. It鈥檚 logical that the sooner you intervene in your dog鈥檚 unacceptable mounting, the better your chances for behavior modification success. "
And - you Can change the behavior. Every time you let it continue it reinforces it.

.... like with barking, scolding does nothing except possibly make it worse.
You can try to avoid the situations that precede it (e.g. getting over-excited ) but I've never seen anyone successfully eliminate this behavior.
Totally agree -- scolding is about the worst training method I have found ! It is definitely negative attention.

I taught my Spoo not to bark, and not to hump. So it is possible. There are good pointers in that article.

Spend most of your time with your dog doing thoroughly enjoyable activities, doing behaviour modification training, .. and respond immediately to the humping by separation and total lack of attention.

With barking I always responded with the first bark by jumping up and saying "show mommy" and following him to see what he was barking about, talking with him about it, and then thanking him. I know this sounds ridiculous :) But when I jumped up at the first bark he quit immediately and led me to the door or the window.

The only time I have a problem is when we stay with my sister for over a few days. Her dog barks at everything, and all she does is yell his name over and over. Bark, bark, yell, etc. It is almost like they are barking at each other. By day three my Spoo is joining in, and it takes a few days when we get home to get him back on schedule.

Last week I was very tired and instead of getting up and saying 'show mommy', I just laid there and asked him to be quiet. He waited a minute, gave one more bark, I asked him again and he just gave me the strangest look - like 'What is wrong with you?' but ambled over and laid down with a big sigh. I almost felt guilty as I did hear someone on the porch.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
I really like that Whole Dog Journal Training article. "The longer your dog has practiced his mounting behavior, the harder it will be to change. It鈥檚 logical that the sooner you intervene in your dog鈥檚 unacceptable mounting, the better your chances for behavior modification success. "
And - you Can change the behavior. Every time you let it continue it reinforces it.



Totally agree -- scolding is about the worst training method I have found ! It is definitely negative attention.

I taught my Spoo not to bark, and not to hump. So it is possible. There are good pointers in that article.

Spend most of your time with your dog doing thoroughly enjoyable activities, doing behaviour modification training, .. and respond immediately to the humping by separation and total lack of attention.

With barking I always responded with the first bark by jumping up and saying "show mommy" and following him to see what he was barking about, talking with him about it, and then thanking him. I know this sounds ridiculous :) But when I jumped up at the first bark he quit immediately and led me to the door or the window.

The only time I have a problem is when we stay with my sister for over a few days. Her dog barks at everything, and all she does is yell his name over and over. Bark, bark, yell, etc. It is almost like they are barking at each other. By day three my Spoo is joining in, and it takes a few days when we get home to get him back on schedule.

Last week I was very tired and instead of getting up and saying 'show mommy', I just laid there and asked him to be quiet. He waited a minute, gave one more bark, I asked him again and he just gave me the strangest look - like 'What is wrong with you?' but ambled over and laid down with a big sigh. I almost felt guilty as I did hear someone on the porch.
This is so cute. He鈥檚 lucky to have you 馃槀. We鈥檝e mostly curved the mounting behavior, even if she thinks about trying she looks at me first and then doesn鈥檛. Also Paris has caught up to her in weight and she鈥檚 not allowing it either. So it鈥檚 going great.
 

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Our tiny poodle never mounted other dogs but she would go nuts with her lambchop toys.:LOL: At first I'd take the toy, then as time went on I just let it happen. when she wanted attention she'd try to straddle someone's foot, everyone thought she was gonna hump them but she never would, she was faithful to lambchop only. lol
 

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I haven鈥檛 had experience with this, other than occasionally with young dogs. I did just have an strange experience with Gracie this weekend though.

Gracie is a young spayed dog. She was spayed at 13 months but never came in heat. I brought her for a play date with my friend鈥檚 cairn terrier. He is intact and she is a breeder so he has been used for stud. At first they played, then he tried to hump her, repeatedly.

Gracie鈥檚 response was to run away from him and zoom around the yard with a toy. He didn鈥檛 chase her, but he is seven and she is a very fast, young poodle. She didn鈥檛 correct him either and at one point just rolled over on to her belly in a submissive move. They both seemed kind of confused by the whole thing, and my friend put him in a crate for a bit to calm down, which helped.

I probably will get them together again as the play part went well and I am good friendS with the dog鈥檚 owner. I assume they will figure it out, and eventually she will tell him to knock it off. I admit that I had to stifle my first response, which was to tell him not to be assaulting my girl! I reminded myself they are dogs after all.
 
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