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In the puppy class I've got Misha in, there are some excitable dogs. The trainer deals with it by putting up barriers to help them concentrate. I think all your trainer is saying is that they aren't capable of helping you. You would be better off with a different trainer. They should at least be able to offer private lessons to help you work on these issues even if they aren't able to deal with them in a class session.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I'm surprised he is allowed at your dog park. Near us intact males older than 6 months are not welcome which is a major part of why we don't go, the other part being that the only dog I could take (Lily) will find any ball left in the place and pester people to play fetch with her until they get tired of her. She ends up disappointed and I also worry about another ball crazy dog picking a fight with her over it.


Keeping him off the balcony sounds like a great idea. He is being allowed to rehearse behaviors you don't really want to encourage in your absence if he is there alone.
The dog parks in our city don't have rules. Pluto is a very extroverted dog who thrives on social interaction with both dogs and people. He gets along with most dogs both on leash and off leash, and will match their play style. The only issue with Pluto is that he can't be calm during the 2 minute walk to the park from the car because he gets so excited to play and that his recall is terrible so we only go to fenced in dog parks and lure him to us with water. We also rent and don't have access to a yard so dog parks are a necessity for him because our frequent walks aren't enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
In the puppy class I've got Misha in, there are some excitable dogs. The trainer deals with it by putting up barriers to help them concentrate. I think all your trainer is saying is that they aren't capable of helping you. You would be better off with a different trainer. They should at least be able to offer private lessons to help you work on these issues even if they aren't able to deal with them in a class session.
There are dividers in the training centre, but the trainer has never offered to separate him to help him concentrate and I didn't realize that was allowed. I don't think the trainer likes us much because she doesn't ever seem to help us as much as our classmates.

She's also only ever seen Pluto in the evenings when he is tired and distracted. He is a very calm dog during the day. Today, I parked myself on a bench in front of the neighbourhood community centre on a decently busy street and we practiced attention exercises. I would click and treat whenever he would give me eye contact or when he stayed whenever a dog would pass by. He was a very good boy the whole time!
 

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Time to find a trainer and place where you aren't throwing your money away for no attention on your issues or progress. In a million years I would never allow what has been happening to you happen in one of my classes. One of the most important skills one on one and class setting trainers need is malleability to know when to step out of the planned lesson to help someone who is having a hard time. It sounds like this trainer has none of that.
 

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Lily cd re is right. What sort of training place are you going to currently? There are a lot of chain training centers where the trainers don't have a great deal of experience, and they mostly offer cookie cutter classes and exercises that are designed for very average dog owners. I would look for a more advanced trainer who has a lot of experience and whom you can talk to about your situation and they can advise you. It sounds like your current trainer doesn't know how to deal with more troublesome behaviors and only wants to work with easy dogs. If you've already tried to talk one on one about your dog and it isn't helping, I'd move on.
 

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And Raindrops I wouldn't even call these behaviors troublesome. The desired attention and such aren't natural behaviors for most dogs, but rather need to be taught. It is much more natural for a puppy or young dog to be interested in looking for a playmate than to pay attention to their person for boring stuff like sitting nicely and pretending the cute girl dog four or five feet away isn't actually there at all.

To teach Javelin to give heads up attention for ring worthy heeling took about five or six months of just getting the attention sitting at heel and then for one step, two steps, four or five steps forward with no looking away.


I just ran across this thread while looking for something else and think you might find it helpful. https://www.poodleforum.com/3-poodle-pictures/267751-okay-attention-seekers-here-my-version-five-cookie-attention-game.html
 

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Discussion Starter #27
It's the highest rated dog training facility in the city. We chose it because it has therapy and agility courses that we wanted to take after beginner's obedience. I have ADHD and a non-verbal learning disorder so I thought it was just my executive functioning issues and not the trainer.

We have one week of class left so we're going to focus on preparing for the test and try a different facility when we're ready to take another class after he's neutered. Thank you for all your advice, I am feeling more confident and Pluto has been doing very well with training now that I've added IYC and LAT exercises into our repertoire.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
It's the highest rated dog training facility in the city. We chose it because it has therapy and agility courses that we wanted to take after beginner's obedience. I have ADHD and a non-verbal learning disorder so I thought it was just my executive functioning issues and not the trainer.

We have one week of class left so we're going to focus on preparing for the test and try a different facility when we're ready to take another class after he's neutered. Thank you for all your advice, I am feeling more confident and Pluto has been doing very well with training now that I've added IYC and LAT exercises into our repertoire.
 

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Keep up the Look at That game. It's incredibly useful when your dog is concerned about something. And you're on the right track if you realize your dog is too excited to eat a treat.

The problem with dog classes is every dog arrives at a different level of skill. Sure, they might call it "beginners" but some beginners are the person's 15th dog. These dogs come to beginners class with a long list of skills they've already been trained. Other dogs have never had a leash on before, and don't know how to sit, and they're beginners, too.

Keep trying. Pluto is young and very silly yet. Keep trying, anyway.
 

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2 different trainers told us that our little guy is praise motivated - he really has never been any kind of food motivated. So that's what we used to train him. One trainer said to "throw a party" every time he does something you want. So we were throwing parties everytime he asked to go to the bathroom in the garage, came back to us when called, and if you can believe it, after he finished eating a meal. I believe he started eating more regularly because of it. Then he gets a bit of yogurt and some dehydrated apple.

His highest value treats, and those we use to reward along with praise, are the dehydrated apples (he comes running when we say the word) and freeze dried liver of any variety.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
We passed beginner's obedience!!!! We got 87/100 and only scored one point below the border collie who is the rockstar in the class. Thank you so much for recommending the LAT and IYC games. I used these games throughout class to help keep him calm while waiting for our turn for the test. He's so much more focused and attentive to my commands now.
 
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