Poodle Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I’m new to poodle world and am excited to have one as a forever family. Anyone has any experience with PJ mini apricot breeder in Oregon? I saw a couple recommendation of them in this forum and would like to hear more feedback on this breeder. Thanks so much.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,100 Posts
Hi and Welcome!

I'm not familiar with that breeder but found what's probably the positive mentions you referred to. I respect that members opinions tho they are before my time here and haven't posted in some years. It's possible that things have changed since they last looked.

Since it has been some time, here's some tips and things to consider and discuss if/when you make contact with them or another breeder.

My criteria need not be yours but I think it's important for a potential poodle owner to understand why these things matter in finding a conscientious breeder and to get a well bred puppy to share life with for many years to come. Simply being advertised as "registered" or even "purebred" doesn't mean that a puppy is well bred.


Every one of these is a talking point a conscientious breeder will welcome, just not all at the same time :)

My ideal breeder is someone who is doing this because they love the breed.
They want to see each new generation born at least as good as the previous, ideally better.
They provide for every dog in their care as if that dog is their own.
They will be there for the new family, and stand behind that pup for it's lifetime, rain or shine, with or without a contract.
They will know the standards and pedigrees of their chosen breed, health and genetic diversity of their lines, and breed to better them.
They will know of the latest studies in health standards for their chosen breed and variety and do the health testing of their breeding dogs.
They prove their dogs meet breed standards and are physically capable by breeding from sires and dams proven in competition or participating in other activities.
They do not cross breed.
They will have as many questions for me as I do for them.
They invest in their dogs. They don't expect the dogs to support them.


Health testing of the breeding parents is a good indicator of a quality, conscientious breeder. The Breeder List has info on what to look for in the testing for each variety. Mentioning health testing on a site is nice but isn't proof. For proof, look for health testing results spelled out on the breeder's site, then verify for yourself by going to the site the results are published on. If you don't find any evidence of testing or can't find the info but the breeder appeals to you, contact them and ask where you might see the testing they do. Reputable breeders put in a lot of effort to make sure they're breeding the healthiest poodles and will be happy to talk about it and provide the info.

Look for and verify OFA/CHIC level testing at a minimum. Poodle specific DNA panels for those testable conditions are companion testing with the OFA/CHIC testing.
Look Up A Dog | Orthopedic Foundation for Animals | Columbia, MO (ofa.org)


A caution that a health "guarantee" on a puppy doesn't have much to back it if the sire and dam were not given the testing for breed and variety. "Guarantees" without the testing often favor the breeder, more than the buyer.

Read thru any contracts that may be listed. If they rule out coverage for conditions that the breeding pair should or could have been tested for, consider that a caution flag. Otherwise, are the terms clear to you and can you live with them?

Conscientious breeders have a waitlist at the best of times and with pandemic puppy seekers, that wait is stretched well into 2021-2022. There have been more than a few serendipitous contacts between seeker and breeder, so don't be put off by the thought of a waitlist. Also, don't be put off if online sites aren't particularly updated. As often as not, breeders may prefer communicating by phone as well as email or text, and are busy with their dogs rather than keep a website updated.

When you start making contacts, let them know if you're open to an older pup or young adult.
Color preferences are understandable but keep in mind that you're limiting your options even further in a very limited supply of puppies. Many poodle colors change thru their lives.
Temperament is lifelong trait.

Be prepared to spend in the range of $2000 to $3500 USD. Conscientious breeders are not padding pricing due to Covid.

Be prepared to travel outside your preferred area.

As a very general rule, websites to be leery of are those that feature cutesy puppies with bows and such, little or no useful info on sires or dams, the word "Order" or "Ordering" (these are living beings, not appliances) and a PayPal or "pay here" button prominently featured "for your convenience".

Be extremely cautious of puppies sold thru pet stores, or online marketplaces like puppyspot, puppyfind, kijiji, craigslist, classified ads, etc. Many of these puppies will be mill puppies and while you may get lucky, the odds are against you and that sweet puppy.

One additional caution, be very wary of those very cute short legged poodles. That's a genetic mutation which may carry serious life-altering disease.


An excellent source for breeder referrals is your local or the regional or national Poodle Club. An online search for "Poodle Club of ___ (your city or state)" will find them. You can also go directly to the national club site.

Some Poodle Club links are in the Breeder List.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi and Welcome!

I'm not familiar with that breeder but found what's probably the positive mentions you referred to. I respect that members opinions tho they are before my time here and haven't posted in some years. It's possible that things have changed since they last looked.

Since it has been some time, here's some tips and things to consider and discuss if/when you make contact with them or another breeder.

My criteria need not be yours but I think it's important for a potential poodle owner to understand why these things matter in finding a conscientious breeder and to get a well bred puppy to share life with for many years to come. Simply being advertised as "registered" or even "purebred" doesn't mean that a puppy is well bred.


Every one of these is a talking point a conscientious breeder will welcome, just not all at the same time :)

My ideal breeder is someone who is doing this because they love the breed.
They want to see each new generation born at least as good as the previous, ideally better.
They provide for every dog in their care as if that dog is their own.
They will be there for the new family, and stand behind that pup for it's lifetime, rain or shine, with or without a contract.
They will know the standards and pedigrees of their chosen breed, health and genetic diversity of their lines, and breed to better them.
They will know of the latest studies in health standards for their chosen breed and variety and do the health testing of their breeding dogs.
They prove their dogs meet breed standards and are physically capable by breeding from sires and dams proven in competition or participating in other activities.
They do not cross breed.
They will have as many questions for me as I do for them.
They invest in their dogs. They don't expect the dogs to support them.


Health testing of the breeding parents is a good indicator of a quality, conscientious breeder. The Breeder List has info on what to look for in the testing for each variety. Mentioning health testing on a site is nice but isn't proof. For proof, look for health testing results spelled out on the breeder's site, then verify for yourself by going to the site the results are published on. If you don't find any evidence of testing or can't find the info but the breeder appeals to you, contact them and ask where you might see the testing they do. Reputable breeders put in a lot of effort to make sure they're breeding the healthiest poodles and will be happy to talk about it and provide the info.

Look for and verify OFA/CHIC level testing at a minimum. Poodle specific DNA panels for those testable conditions are companion testing with the OFA/CHIC testing.
Look Up A Dog | Orthopedic Foundation for Animals | Columbia, MO (ofa.org)


A caution that a health "guarantee" on a puppy doesn't have much to back it if the sire and dam were not given the testing for breed and variety. "Guarantees" without the testing often favor the breeder, more than the buyer.

Read thru any contracts that may be listed. If they rule out coverage for conditions that the breeding pair should or could have been tested for, consider that a caution flag. Otherwise, are the terms clear to you and can you live with them?

Conscientious breeders have a waitlist at the best of times and with pandemic puppy seekers, that wait is stretched well into 2021-2022. There have been more than a few serendipitous contacts between seeker and breeder, so don't be put off by the thought of a waitlist. Also, don't be put off if online sites aren't particularly updated. As often as not, breeders may prefer communicating by phone as well as email or text, and are busy with their dogs rather than keep a website updated.

When you start making contacts, let them know if you're open to an older pup or young adult.
Color preferences are understandable but keep in mind that you're limiting your options even further in a very limited supply of puppies. Many poodle colors change thru their lives.
Temperament is lifelong trait.

Be prepared to spend in the range of $2000 to $3500 USD. Conscientious breeders are not padding pricing due to Covid.

Be prepared to travel outside your preferred area.

As a very general rule, websites to be leery of are those that feature cutesy puppies with bows and such, little or no useful info on sires or dams, the word "Order" or "Ordering" (these are living beings, not appliances) and a PayPal or "pay here" button prominently featured "for your convenience".

Be extremely cautious of puppies sold thru pet stores, or online marketplaces like puppyspot, puppyfind, kijiji, craigslist, classified ads, etc. Many of these puppies will be mill puppies and while you may get lucky, the odds are against you and that sweet puppy.

One additional caution, be very wary of those very cute short legged poodles. That's a genetic mutation which may carry serious life-altering disease.


An excellent source for breeder referrals is your local or the regional or national Poodle Club. An online search for "Poodle Club of ___ (your city or state)" will find them. You can also go directly to the national club site.

Some Poodle Club links are in the Breeder List.
Thank you R
Hi and Welcome!

I'm not familiar with that breeder but found what's probably the positive mentions you referred to. I respect that members opinions tho they are before my time here and haven't posted in some years. It's possible that things have changed since they last looked.

Since it has been some time, here's some tips and things to consider and discuss if/when you make contact with them or another breeder.

My criteria need not be yours but I think it's important for a potential poodle owner to understand why these things matter in finding a conscientious breeder and to get a well bred puppy to share life with for many years to come. Simply being advertised as "registered" or even "purebred" doesn't mean that a puppy is well bred.


Every one of these is a talking point a conscientious breeder will welcome, just not all at the same time :)

My ideal breeder is someone who is doing this because they love the breed.
They want to see each new generation born at least as good as the previous, ideally better.
They provide for every dog in their care as if that dog is their own.
They will be there for the new family, and stand behind that pup for it's lifetime, rain or shine, with or without a contract.
They will know the standards and pedigrees of their chosen breed, health and genetic diversity of their lines, and breed to better them.
They will know of the latest studies in health standards for their chosen breed and variety and do the health testing of their breeding dogs.
They prove their dogs meet breed standards and are physically capable by breeding from sires and dams proven in competition or participating in other activities.
They do not cross breed.
They will have as many questions for me as I do for them.
They invest in their dogs. They don't expect the dogs to support them.


Health testing of the breeding parents is a good indicator of a quality, conscientious breeder. The Breeder List has info on what to look for in the testing for each variety. Mentioning health testing on a site is nice but isn't proof. For proof, look for health testing results spelled out on the breeder's site, then verify for yourself by going to the site the results are published on. If you don't find any evidence of testing or can't find the info but the breeder appeals to you, contact them and ask where you might see the testing they do. Reputable breeders put in a lot of effort to make sure they're breeding the healthiest poodles and will be happy to talk about it and provide the info.

Look for and verify OFA/CHIC level testing at a minimum. Poodle specific DNA panels for those testable conditions are companion testing with the OFA/CHIC testing.
Look Up A Dog | Orthopedic Foundation for Animals | Columbia, MO (ofa.org)


A caution that a health "guarantee" on a puppy doesn't have much to back it if the sire and dam were not given the testing for breed and variety. "Guarantees" without the testing often favor the breeder, more than the buyer.

Read thru any contracts that may be listed. If they rule out coverage for conditions that the breeding pair should or could have been tested for, consider that a caution flag. Otherwise, are the terms clear to you and can you live with them?

Conscientious breeders have a waitlist at the best of times and with pandemic puppy seekers, that wait is stretched well into 2021-2022. There have been more than a few serendipitous contacts between seeker and breeder, so don't be put off by the thought of a waitlist. Also, don't be put off if online sites aren't particularly updated. As often as not, breeders may prefer communicating by phone as well as email or text, and are busy with their dogs rather than keep a website updated.

When you start making contacts, let them know if you're open to an older pup or young adult.
Color preferences are understandable but keep in mind that you're limiting your options even further in a very limited supply of puppies. Many poodle colors change thru their lives.
Temperament is lifelong trait.

Be prepared to spend in the range of $2000 to $3500 USD. Conscientious breeders are not padding pricing due to Covid.

Be prepared to travel outside your preferred area.

As a very general rule, websites to be leery of are those that feature cutesy puppies with bows and such, little or no useful info on sires or dams, the word "Order" or "Ordering" (these are living beings, not appliances) and a PayPal or "pay here" button prominently featured "for your convenience".

Be extremely cautious of puppies sold thru pet stores, or online marketplaces like puppyspot, puppyfind, kijiji, craigslist, classified ads, etc. Many of these puppies will be mill puppies and while you may get lucky, the odds are against you and that sweet puppy.

One additional caution, be very wary of those very cute short legged poodles. That's a genetic mutation which may carry serious life-altering disease.


An excellent source for breeder referrals is your local or the regional or national Poodle Club. An online search for "Poodle Club of ___ (your city or state)" will find them. You can also go directly to the national club site.

Some Poodle Club links are in the Breeder List.
Thank you Rose for the excellent tips. I will keep them in mind. I also agree that verifying the health/ genetic tests are very important. This is a lifetime partner so it is wise to be extra cautious. I will ask for it. As for now I am still looking for a red/ apricot and I don’t mind waiting or branching out of my state. Also, it is interesting how some breeders could have a very long waitlist but said that no health tests are necessary since they think they have been breeding so long and are able to weed out those genetic issue and thus the health guarantee for x years. Everyone has different breeding policy. Have you heard of Rankin Poodle? They openly shared the test of their sire and dam on their website.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,100 Posts
I don't have any experience with them either but I mostly like what I see on the website.

I'd like to see that they compete in something with their dogs, or do therapy work, something besides just The Life of Riley, but not a deal breaker.

I think 7 weeks is more typical to determine personality and temperament.

I understand their reasoning for not having anyone in their home until pick up day and they've developed a way of staying in contact, but it's not the same as being there.

I would take them up on the offer to see the contract and guarantee prior to making a full commitment.

I'm a little leery of withholding the registration papers until seen by a vet, although that's a very good idea regardless. 3 days is pretty typical. I don't like that they will void the health guarantee if that doesn't happen. There may need to be some allowances made for covid on that side as well.

Make sure the microchip info is also changed to you.

One thing that does bother me is the different pricing on puppies. They aren't selling full reg vs limited reg - all their puppies are limited reg per their site, so what are they basing that difference on? If it's size, gender or color, it costs them the same to bring each puppy into the world. Pricing based on those criteria is not something I like to see.

I see nothing that would stop me from learning more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't have any experience with them either but I mostly like what I see on the website.

I'd like to see that they compete in something with their dogs, or do therapy work, something besides just The Life of Riley, but not a deal breaker.

I think 7 weeks is more typical to determine personality and temperament.

I understand their reasoning for not having anyone in their home until pick up day and they've developed a way of staying in contact, but it's not the same as being there.

I would take them up on the offer to see the contract and guarantee prior to making a full commitment.

I'm a little leery of withholding the registration papers until seen by a vet, although that's a very good idea regardless. 3 days is pretty typical. I don't like that they will void the health guarantee if that doesn't happen. There may need to be some allowances made for covid on that side as well.

Make sure the microchip info is also changed to you.

One thing that does bother me is the different pricing on puppies. They aren't selling full reg vs limited reg - all their puppies are limited reg per their site, so what are they basing that difference on? If it's size, gender or color, it costs them the same to bring each puppy into the world. Pricing based on those criteria is not something I like to see.

I see nothing that would stop me from learning more.
Thank you for the advice and feedback. Greatly appreciate it. About the different pricing, you are right, it is rather odd but I notice it is typical west coast thing with breeders that do not do competition. But it is generally based on size (ie smaller mini or smaller toy - general reasoning is smaller is more fragile and need more attention as babies) /color, I’m not sure about rankin. They have no plan to breed red this year so I prob will be on lookout for their next breeding season. This is v helpful. Thank you again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Hi Cometandpudding.
We got our Beau from PJ’s and he is a beautiful healthy pup (so far at 6 months 😉 ).
I didn’t do “all” my homework as suggested (slap my hand), but I thought Penny was sincere, super loving and caring of poodles with strict criteria about how they should be bred and raised.
We are not planning to show or compete Beau, but a sibling went for agility. We get a lot of comments from seemingly knowing people that we coii hi le show Beau, due to hit shape and the way he carries himself. The puppies seemed well cared for (per a home visit).
we wanted a mini on the bigger side and a bit higher energy and that’s exactly what we got.
476380

476381
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi Cometandpudding.
We got our Beau from PJ’s and he is a beautiful healthy pup (so far at 6 months 😉 ).
I didn’t do “all” my homework as suggested (slap my hand), but I thought Penny was sincere, super loving and caring of poodles with strict criteria about how they should be bred and raised.
We are not planning to show or compete Beau, but a sibling went for agility. We get a lot of comments from seemingly knowing people that we coii hi le show Beau, due to hit shape and the way he carries himself. The puppies seemed well cared for (per a home visit).
we wanted a mini on the bigger side and a bit higher energy and that’s exactly what we got.
View attachment 476380
View attachment 476381
Aww your Beau is so gorgeous and I love his long legs. Thank you for sharing your lovely picture of Beau and the experience. It is very helpful. Does Beau have an IG acct?
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top