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Zephyr's two best friends are Standard Poodles that he met at the park. I think they play differently than other dogs, so their style suits each other. Poodles jump a lot, and they rear up and box with each other, which I don't see them doing with other breeds. Pics are of Zephyr playing with his friend Sadie.

Other dogs recognize their own breeds also, my Giant Schnauzers always recognized Schnauzers of any size.
 

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Absolutely. They recognize that poodle gait when they see a poodle across the room. They love to run and bounce.
 
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Zephyr's two best friends are Standard Poodles that he met at the park. I think they play differently than other dogs, so their style suits each other. Poodles jump a lot, and they rear up and box with each other, which I don't see them doing with other breeds. Pics are of Zephyr playing with his friend Sadie.



Other dogs recognize their own breeds also, my Giant Schnauzers always recognized Schnauzers of any size.
Loved the pics! It is so rare that we meet another Standard. They certainly do play differently and have so much fun together. Our Charlie never tires of playing, up to the point one time that he kept stopping on the 3 km walk back to the car and looking beseechingly at me ......dream on, if you think I am carrying a long legged beast who weighs 80 pounds.....

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Molly ALWAYS acknowledges a 'cousin'! It's really funny because when we are out she rarely even pays attention to other dogs even if they come up to her to greet she will ignore them UNLESS they are a poodle of some kind! The only other dogs she gets 'happy' to meet are Yellow Labs and Golden Retrievers but that is because those are the breeds that socialized her! (my son's dogs taught Molly her manners as a pup!)
 

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my male lowchen was notably uninterested in other dogs - except other lowchen - and those tended to be few and far between. i always assumed dogs recognized their own from having grown up with them, but i have no proof. maybe there's a magic pawshake or tail wag for each breed?
 

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I have always thought the same thing, Pat - Sophy is particularly interested in other papillons, and Poppy in poodles, even big ones. Perhaps there is a difference in smell, as well as appearance?
 

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there is certainly something, because my lowchen was bullied by a jack russell at the dog park (until the day he decided to 'fight' back). and ever after, he would go berserk when he saw one, barking like crazy. it was an eye popping experience watching my sedate boy explode in some crazy ranting when we came across one on a walk. maybe someday we will be testing 'purebred' by breed smell as well as pedigree.
 
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my male lowchen was notably uninterested in other dogs - except other lowchen - and those tended to be few and far between. i always assumed dogs recognized their own from having grown up with them, but i have no proof. maybe there's a magic pawshake or tail wag for each breed?
I vote for the secret tail wag

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the interesting thing about the tail wag issue is that some behaviorists believe that by docking dogs we are interfering with their ability to full communicate with each other - let alone with us.
 

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the interesting thing about the tail wag issue is that some behaviorists believe that by docking dogs we are interfering with their ability to full communicate with each other - let alone with us.
That is a really interesting observation. I've been seeing articles on the subject too. After 30+ years of owning Schnauzers who came to us with docked tails, we now have a standard poodle with natural tail. We live in British Columbia, which , like the majority of Canadian provinces, bans ear clipping and tail docking. I am astounded by the range of emotions our Charlie expresses with his tail! We have become adept at interpreting his needs and state of mind by checking the position of his tail. At dog parks, we watch his tail to see if he is comfortable with a new dog. Watching him approach a potential new playmate is very interesting because he has an identifiable set of signals with head and tail positions that indicate his willingness to play and lack of aggression. Everyone who meets Charlie is delighted by his jaunty banner of a tail, which is long enough to be carried in a full circle over his back. In addition, we keep the hair on it quite long even when his body is shaved to a one inch length, so he has a luxurious plume that streams over his back. Since he is a really large dog, people who are hesitant about approaching focus on his huge wagging flag of a tail, which he unashamedly uses to lure humans close enough to pet him. Due to his exceptional size, we were scrupulous about training him to never move towards people, rather he must stand at my side, wagging his tail and immediately sit when they approach to reassure them he would never jump up. I can actually see people eyeing his frantically wagging tail , and then deciding he is safe to approach. Yes, it is an effective means of communication!

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