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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi , We have a 13 year old female toy poodle who is the only dog and gets a lot of affection and attention. She is not very friendly when meeting other dogs while out walking but is a very gentle loving dog at home. Next week a new female miniature poodle is arriving in the house , 10 weeks old who is very lively. Our 13 year old sleeps a lot. I think we might have trouble brewing with her reaction to the new arrival. I would really appreciate your advice and experience .
 

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I introduced a male puppy very successfully to Poppy (12 at that point, but suffering from liver failure) and Sophy (nearly 13). I was very clear that a puppy was my idea, not theirs, and that it was my responsibility to ensure that they were not teased or bullied and that their comfortable routines were disturbed as little as possible.

The dynamics between two females are likely to be trickier, especially as the puppy matures should she decide she wants to take over, but key things I recommend are:
  • Use a puppy pen, and make it a happy place for the puppy. Fortunately Freddy was already very used to a pen - I set it up close to my chair and the older dogs' beds so he was close to us but could not tease them.
  • Ensure plenty of long naps. At the first sign of teasing or being irritating he went to bed in his pen with a biscuit - and slept.
  • Back up appropriate discipline from the older dog. Sophy set the rules for when, where and how she interacted with him, and I supported her, even when they seemed a bit arbitrary. At first he was not allowed within 6 feet of her, that quickly reduced to not on her bed, then only by invitation.
  • Sharing games from the moment they meet. I introduced the older dogs to the puppy on neutral ground at his breeder's and played the one-for game which my two were already very familiar with. As having the pup around meant lots of extra games for really good stuff it helped to sweeten the transition.

Expect to keep pup and older dog separated much of the time, and to supervise closely whenever they are together. If you are very lucky they may build the sort of relationship Sophy and Freddy have, where she teaches him, mentors him, plays with him and tells him when enough is enough, and has a new lease of life running around with him. Poppy simply ignores him, and roars at him if he pushes her too far, and that is fine too. What you want to avoid at all costs is the pup teasing the older dog until her life is miserable or she snaps and fur flies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I introduced a male puppy very successfully to Poppy (12 at that point, but suffering from liver failure) and Sophy (nearly 13). I was very clear that a puppy was my idea, not theirs, and that it was my responsibility to ensure that they were not teased or bullied and that their comfortable routines were disturbed as little as possible.

The dynamics between two females are likely to be trickier, especially as the puppy matures should she decide she wants to take over, but key things I recommend are:
  • Use a puppy pen, and make it a happy place for the puppy. Fortunately Freddy was already very used to a pen - I set it up close to my chair and the older dogs' beds so he was close to us but could not tease them.
  • Ensure plenty of long naps. At the first sign of teasing or being irritating he went to bed in his pen with a biscuit - and slept.
  • Back up appropriate discipline from the older dog. Sophy set the rules for when, where and how she interacted with him, and I supported her, even when they seemed a bit arbitrary. At first he was not allowed within 6 feet of her, that quickly reduced to not on her bed, then only by invitation.
  • Sharing games from the moment they meet. I introduced the older dogs to the puppy on neutral ground at his breeder's and played the one-for game which my two were already very familiar with. As having the pup around meant lots of extra games for really good stuff it helped to sweeten the transition.

Expect to keep pup and older dog separated much of the time, and to supervise closely whenever they are together. If you are very lucky they may build the sort of relationship Sophy and Freddy have, where she teaches him, mentors him, plays with him and tells him when enough is enough, and has a new lease of life running around with him. Poppy simply ignores him, and roars at him if he pushes her too far, and that is fine too. What you want to avoid at all costs is the pup teasing the older dog until her life is miserable or she snaps and fur flies.
thanks very much for the great advice , I will take heed of it
 

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Basically what fjm has recommended, I introduced a 17 week old female to two 13 year old females. Then I introduced a 20 week old female to a 13 year old and 11 month old.
The biggest misconception is that you can just put animals together and they will get along or they will sort it out.

Also another big thing people get wrong is giving the new pup all the freedom the older dog enjoys, skipping the part where the pup learns and has respect house rules.
Puppies gave to earn that freedom through training and maturity
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Basically what fjm has recommended, I introduced a 17 week old female to two 13 year old females. Then I introduced a 20 week old female to a 13 year old and 11 month old.
The biggest misconception is that you can just put animals together and they will get along or they will sort it out.

Also another big thing people get wrong is giving the new pup all the freedom the older dog enjoys, skipping the part where the pup learns and has respect house rules.
Puppies gave to earn that freedom through training and maturity
I will remember Twyla , appreciated
 

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Such excellent advice given. The one thing that we think is helpful when introducing a new pup/dog is to set up the initial meeting in a neutral territory. Doing something “together” like meeting at a park or riding in the car together can get the initial meeting and bonding process off to a good start. It’s sort of like, “We’re together” vs “Oh no!” “There’s an intruder who just came into my house!” Since each dog easily fits in a carrier they could ride together, go some place together and sniff and be exposed to one another but both feel safe and not overwhelmed by one another.
 

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Be sure to give your older dog the same level of attention (or at least close to it) as you did before. Don't make the new puppy your only focus.
That’s very important. When I get a new dog, I make sure the « old » dog gets everything first, and the puppy, second. Dinner, treats, toys, affection, etc. The puppy gets as much, or even more, but AFTER. This helps put in place a new, peaceful order in the family.
 

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Hi and Welcome!

I have no actual advice but am adding a brief tale of my experience adding a puppy to a senior's life.

I had a 13 year old miniature poodle girl. She was still clear of mind and sight and hearing but definitely slowing down physically.

Without consulting Missy, I brought a new puppy into our home.

Initially there was not a meeting of the minds. Puppy Sass was a pain in the rear for Missy and Missy had to find ways to escape. She started moving faster, then started jumping up on the sofa again to escape. It took a while, weeks, maybe even a couple of months but one day I noticed that instead of escaping, Sass was running with Missy chasing and it was Game on! They were good friends for the rest of Missy's life.

Sass definitely brought fun and activity and companionship to Missy thru her last years. Without even considering how it would affect Missy, I'd accidentally given her a gift.

This isn't everyone's good luck but it was ours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hi and Welcome!

I have no actual advice but am adding a brief tale of my experience adding a puppy to a senior's life.

I had a 13 year old miniature poodle girl. She was still clear of mind and sight and hearing but definitely slowing down physically.

Without consulting Missy, I brought a new puppy into our home.

Initially there was not a meeting of the minds. Puppy Sass was a pain in the rear for Missy and Missy had to find ways to escape. She started moving faster, then started jumping up on the sofa again to escape. It took a while, weeks, maybe even a couple of months but one day I noticed that instead of escaping, Sass was running with Missy chasing and it was Game on! They were good friends for the rest of Missy's life.

Sass definitely brought fun and activity and companionship to Missy thru her last years. Without even considering how it would affect Missy, I'd accidentally given her a gift.

This isn't everyone's good luck but it was ours.
That was a great outcome, hope I have such a wonderful experience. Was Sass a male or female puppy ?
 

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I must say, this was in 1983 so I have few snapshot memories, more a mood of memories :). There's a lot that's been learned in these last decades.

Having said that, once our two girls adjusted, my memory says that Missy, the matriarch, took over "training" Sass in a lot of the house rules simply by being the example. I don't mean that we ignored Sass, more that it seemed natural for Missy to do this. This wasn't something that we expected and helped Sass and the rest of us too.

There might not be enough time, but if you can get a towel or blanket with your new puppy's scent on it to introduce your matriarch first to the puppy's scent, and the reverse also.

Usually, it would also be suggested to get something that has her mother and littermates scent if possible.

PF is here for you all. I hope you stay in touch!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I must say, this was in 1983 so I have few snapshot memories, more a mood of memories :). There's a lot that's been learned in these last decades.

Having said that, once our two girls adjusted, my memory says that Missy, the matriarch, took over "training" Sass in a lot of the house rules simply by being the example. I don't mean that we ignored Sass, more that it seemed natural for Missy to do this. This wasn't something that we expected and helped Sass and the rest of us too.

There might not be enough time, but if you can get a towel or blanket with your new puppy's scent on it to introduce your matriarch first to the puppy's scent, and the reverse also.

Usually, it would also be suggested to get something that has her mother and littermates scent if possible.

PF is here for you all. I hope you stay in touch!
Wonderful idea , Thanks so Much !:)
 

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I second the neutral territory. I always have dogs meet out on a public walk away from the house, and only head toward the house after they have become friendly, It has always worked for me.
On the other hand, there are always dogs that mine likes more than others.
If I get another dog while he is alive, he gets to choose!
 
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