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She's a character he at the barn where I live. There's 10 cows now along with the horses a she's trying to learn how to herd them I'm having to teach her new commands to start and stop and give directions at the same time I'm working on basic obedience. At my somewhat advanced age it keeps me busy. My knees aren't good so I'm teaching her to pick things up for me and to brace for me when i first stand and am a bit wobbly. At almost 6 months she's doing a lot more than I'd expected. Love her to death!
 

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Thank you! She's my first poodle so there's a steep learning curve as my previous dogs, while good dogs and fairly smart, aren't necessarily the sharpest tools in the shed in comparison! I got Emma to become a stranger deterrant with her expected size and me being alone. Didn't want a biter, more alert barking and giving strangers pause not knowing if she would bite or not. So far she's gotten good at that job even tho she likes all different people after meeting them, she waits for me to tell her it's Ok to make friends. She does this funny thing of "smiling" when she's happy to see you but strangers think she's snarling. I'm not telling anyone any different if they're not on my friend list, that's her point and purpose, to give pause, warning to me. Had two break ins here and first one two years ago the dirtbags killed the mini donkey with a pellet gun they stole. Never caught them. Since Emma came with her huge deep voice on one's showed up that isn't welcome. I raised and trained Rottweilers in my younger life so am competent to channel her energy and instill controls for her in her life here with me without endangering the general public. She's so smart it's been way easier than the Rotties. Sorry for the book! You can probably tell I spend 99% of my time alone with the animals!
 

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What a lovely poodle - sometimes it is hard to train basic commands and specialized commands at the same time. I just mix up the commands, some from each type in each small training session. We normally train in 10 minute sessions several times a day.
 

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Looking good, Emma! I’m sorry you had those terrible break ins, and hope that a poodle first alert will keep you safe.
 

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She is a beautiful girl!
Thank you. When I purchased her I was very naive and uneducated about poodles so she has a minimal but noticable overbite and maybe slightly sickelhocked and her eyes are a bit round. So far tho she's been totally healthy, cast iron stomach (has to have as she snacks on horse and cow poop why more than I like) and a kind happy heart connected to a pretty fantastic brain! She'll never be a mom as being a previous breeder of Rottweilers and striving for only the best is never think of breeding a less that ideal animal. Her original capacity with me was never about breeding to begin with. So far her hips are fine and I've gotten her steps to get up and down places where she'd be jumping but she's a busy, busy girl outside and no way to slow her down especially while I'm working. I can't jog and I sold my last horse so she'll not be over exerted that way. I'll have her OFAd when she's old enough and am going to have her tested for the hereditary issues so prevalent with many poodles a well. If for no other reason than to be aware myself of possible issues. I'm not too worried about bloat a she's being raised a free feeder with no set meals. I've raised dogs for years this way and not had any get overweight so there's that. If she has a long healthylife she might outlive me! I am training toward a service dog for picking things up that I drop. With bad knees and a stiff back just that one thing, maybe to "brace" for me when I first stand up would be nice. All in good time since I don't want to stress her bones. She's turning into a multi tasker. Seems to like it. Dang, the i go again, another stinking book! Sorry.
 

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What a lucky dog - i think an active life with a lot of "jobs" is about the most satisfying life a dog can have.

The local herding trainer told me that poodles are some of the best non-herding herding dogs she's worked with. Not surprised to hear yours is already figuring it out!
 

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She's a character he at the barn where I live. There's 10 cows now along with the horses a she's trying to learn how to herd them I'm having to teach her new commands to start and stop and give directions at the same time I'm working on basic obedience. At my somewhat advanced age it keeps me busy. My knees aren't good so I'm teaching her to pick things up for me and to brace for me when i first stand and am a bit wobbly. At almost 6 months she's doing a lot more than I'd expected. Love her to death!
What a great dog! I bought a Ruff Wear harness for my Charlie , who tips the scale at over 80 pounds and is around 29 inches at the shoulder, so I don,t have to lean down to grab the handle. I have a bad ankle, but still spend hours hiking mountain trails and snowshoeing . When I need help steadying myself on loose or steep trails, I say "help me" and Charlie walks at my side, Bracing his big clawed feet to support me. If I am kneeling, I call him over and brace myself on his shoulders to get up. The harness also has pockets built in to carry water pouches, has reflective trim and spots to snap on things like our night flashing light and bear bells.

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Thank you! She's my first poodle so there's a steep learning curve as my previous dogs, while good dogs and fairly smart, aren't necessarily the sharpest tools in the shed in comparison! I got Emma to become a stranger deterrant with her expected size and me being alone. Didn't want a biter, more alert barking and giving strangers pause not knowing if she would bite or not. So far she's gotten good at that job even tho she likes all different people after meeting them, she waits for me to tell her it's Ok to make friends. She does this funny thing of "smiling" when she's happy to see you but strangers think she's snarling. I'm not telling anyone any different if they're not on my friend list, that's her point and purpose, to give pause, warning to me. Had two break ins here and first one two years ago the dirtbags killed the mini donkey with a pellet gun they stole. Never caught them. Since Emma came with her huge deep voice on one's showed up that isn't welcome. I raised and trained Rottweilers in my younger life so am competent to channel her energy and instill controls for her in her life here with me without endangering the general public. She's so smart it's been way easier than the Rotties. Sorry for the book! You can probably tell I spend 99% of my time alone with the animals!
I enjoyed all of your writing! After decades of Standard Schnauzers, who were completely fearless and very effective guard dogs, we end up with this huge clown of a Standard Poodle. He adores everyone and we joke that he would show the burglar where the silver is kept and hold the door for him. He is amazingly smart, but sure no guard dog

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Thank you. When I purchased her I was very naive and uneducated about poodles so she has a minimal but noticable overbite and maybe slightly sickelhocked and her eyes are a bit round. So far tho she's been totally healthy, cast iron stomach (has to have as she snacks on horse and cow poop why more than I like) and a kind happy heart connected to a pretty fantastic brain! She'll never be a mom as being a previous breeder of Rottweilers and striving for only the best is never think of breeding a less that ideal animal. Her original capacity with me was never about breeding to begin with. So far her hips are fine and I've gotten her steps to get up and down places where she'd be jumping but she's a busy, busy girl outside and no way to slow her down especially while I'm working. I can't jog and I sold my last horse so she'll not be over exerted that way. I'll have her OFAd when she's old enough and am going to have her tested for the hereditary issues so prevalent with many poodles a well. If for no other reason than to be aware myself of possible issues. I'm not too worried about bloat a she's being raised a free feeder with no set meals. I've raised dogs for years this way and not had any get overweight so there's that. If she has a long healthylife she might outlive me! I am training toward a service dog for picking things up that I drop. With bad knees and a stiff back just that one thing, maybe to "brace" for me when I first stand up would be nice. All in good time since I don't want to stress her bones. She's turning into a multi tasker. Seems to like it. Dang, the i go again, another stinking book! Sorry.
Hahaha! Those yummy, still steaming horse buns are irresistible. Whenever I stay at my sister in law s (5 horses, lots of sheep) I am constantly yelling at Charlie to stop snacking. He looks up with a mouthful - and it makes me gag. No licky kisses for sure

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She's a character he at the barn where I live. There's 10 cows now along with the horses a she's trying to learn how to herd them I'm having to teach her new commands to start and stop and give directions at the same time I'm working on basic obedience. At my somewhat advanced age it keeps me busy. My knees aren't good so I'm teaching her to pick things up for me and to brace for me when i first stand and am a bit wobbly. At almost 6 months she's doing a lot more than I'd expected. Love her to death!
Our silly Charlie loves to tease my sister in law s barn cats. He would never actually hurt them. Just dances back and forth, luring them into chasing him. Despite the fact that he weighs over 80 pounds, there is one feisty little cat who always chases him, slapping his fluffy pantaloons with her claws. She might weigh all of 7 pounds, and seeing her furiously pursuing Poodle across the barnyard is hilarious. Charlie is tremendously fast, and I can see that he is deliberately slowing down just to keep her interested in the chase.

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I enjoyed all of your writing! After decades of Standard Schnauzers, who were completely fearless and very effective guard dogs, we end up with this huge clown of a Standard Poodle. He adores everyone and we joke that he would show the burglar where the silver is kept and hold the door for him. He is amazingly smart, but sure no guard dog

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Emma likes everyone a well, after I tell her they are mommy approved. She probably wouldn't bother anyone if I wasn't here either truth be told, but I really do like her being a bit reserved. My normal protectors have always been Rottweilers, raised some from Germany Ann's had a female i trained thru her Schutshund ll. She was great but in my present place and lifestyle with the horses and cattle I worry I wouldn't get another with the common sense my old Tildy had. There's so much for Emma to learn and I hope I have the smarts and stamina to get er done. Never thought I'd start over with a pup at 70 but here I am, doggie mom again.
 

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Emma likes everyone a well, after I tell her they are mommy approved. She probably wouldn't bother anyone if I wasn't here either truth be told, but I really do like her being a bit reserved. My normal protectors have always been Rottweilers, raised some from Germany Ann's had a female i trained thru her Schutshund ll. She was great but in my present place and lifestyle with the horses and cattle I worry I wouldn't get another with the common sense my old Tildy had. There's so much for Emma to learn and I hope I have the smarts and stamina to get er done. Never thought I'd start over with a pup at 70 but here I am, doggie mom again.
After 50 years of owning and training dogs, we got this Poodle pup. And one day I turned to my husband and said, "I suddenly realized this is likely our last dog" . If he lives to 15, I will be 75. I would be worried about getting another dog at that age in case something happened and I could not care for it. We once adopted a dog whose heartbroken owners fell ill and had to move into a nursing home. It is a funny feeling. After a lifetime of caring for and being responsible for many animals and our own kids and others (we took in 27 teens over 30 years of providing Home Stay care) the thought of being unable to care for a creature is very disturbing

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After 50 years of owning and training dogs, we got this Poodle pup. And one day I turned to my husband and said, "I suddenly realized this is likely our last dog" . If he lives to 15, I will be 75. I would be worried about getting another dog at that age in case something happened and I could not care for it. We once adopted a dog whose heartbroken owners fell ill and had to move into a nursing home. It is a funny feeling. After a lifetime of caring for and being responsible for many animals and our own kids and others (we took in 27 teens over 30 years of providing Home Stay care) the thought of being unable to care for a creature is very disturbing

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Yes, I've thought about my mortality since my husband passed 3 years ago. I made end of life arrangements with family and friends for my crew if I should pass before them. One is 15 now and won't see 16, one is 12, my mini Schnauzer, and he is very healthy so some years possible as the last one lived to 17, there's Annie the Toy Aussie mix who is 5 this year and could live many more years but has a intermittent cough from a trachea issue so who knows for sure... and then there's Emma. Should she live to 15, and if I'm still kicking, I'd be 85. So my directive covers my possible incapacitation, or commitment, and inevitable death. That's all I can do for them and enjoy the time we all have left. Whenever my time is up I'm fine with it, not wishing, just prepared.
 

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I enjoyed reading this thread very much. I love reading how well Emma is training. It is so nice when you have the land and the dog can have the freedom to learn in that situation. Years back we lived on 34 acres, had horses and goats, cats , dog and even rabbits for a time. I had rottweilers and a lab back then. The dogs were all trained well, never chased any other animals and stayed within our property lines. Our lab would follow our kids and us everywhere. Our neighbors were in their 90's still had a few pigs and chickens. When we would stop by to say hello the lab would follow and just lie down at the bottom of their steps never chasing a chicken. Today I think its more difficult training a dog to have proper manners who living in a subdivision with house upon house and having to be leashed anytime when not behind a fenced in area. You have brought me back to good memories. I wish I had never had to leave our little farm but life takes on its many paths. I'm close to your age and my daughter says to never worry about my pets, she will always care for them. Thats a good feeling.
 

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I enjoyed reading this thread very much. I love reading how well Emma is training. It is so nice when you have the land and the dog can have the freedom to learn in that situation. Years back we lived on 34 acres, had horses and goats, cats , dog and even rabbits for a time. I had rottweilers and a lab back then. The dogs were all trained well, never chased any other animals and stayed within our property lines. Our lab would follow our kids and us everywhere. Our neighbors were in their 90's still had a few pigs and chickens. When we would stop by to say hello the lab would follow and just lie down at the bottom of their steps never chasing a chicken. Today I think its more difficult training a dog to have proper manners who living in a subdivision with house upon house and having to be leashed anytime when not behind a fenced in area. You have brought me back to good memories. I wish I had never had to leave our little farm but life takes on its many paths. I'm close to your age and my daughter says to never worry about my pets, she will always care for them. Thats a good feeling.
Bless your kind daughter

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