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I love using other kinds of kibble as treats for puppies. Cheap, nutritionally balanced, and in convenient sizes! Anything you can get that can be broken into a piece <1/2 a pinkie nail in sized makes a good training treat. My spoo learned reliable sit, down, and stay with pieces of frozen veggies!

As for the cry it out method - that's what I was always taught/we always did. I tried it with my spoo, and I think it's why to this day, she HATES and refuses to enter of hard sided crates (rough drive in the hard sided crate, then a night in the crate "crying it out" for 3 hrs straight the first night, several hours of crying over the next few nights before I figured it out, and also bought her a different (wire) crate). I am not going to try it again with future dogs, too stressful for the puppy, too stressful for me, and I can't afford to lose that much sleep!
 

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I think you do what works for u and your puppy. I got my spoo at 8 weeks and first two weeks either me or my oldest daughter slept in the living room with him(in crate). I’ve slowly gotten him crate trained. But every dog and human is different. What works for mine might not work for u and yours. U will get lots of ideas and options on here. Let us know what works!
 

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Due to an early temperament scare, I've taken a very different approach with Peggy than with my past dogs. It's been so good for her (and honestly so good for us, too), I would never go back.

I basically approach everything as "How do I reward the good behaviour?" And when she does something undesirable, I think "How is she being rewarded for this? What's she getting out of it?"

With those questions as my foundation, I'm finding it easier to problem solve, meaning each new issue that pops up (there's always something) is less likely to overwhelm me.

So applying this philosophy to crate training, I would no longer let a puppy cry it out without rewarding them in some way once they've stopped. If puppy stops crying and still finds herself alone in the dark, what has she learned? Perhaps that crying accomplishes nothing. Or perhaps that crying is comforting when she's scared.

I'd personally prefer she learn that settling quietly = good things.

Of course, some dogs just have wonderful, easygoing temperaments, and they'll roll with whatever you throw at them. But poodles have good memories and will stun you with their capacity for learning.....for better or worse. ;)
 

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Due to an early temperament scare, I've taken a very different approach with Peggy than with my past dogs. It's been so good for her (and honestly so good for us, too), I would never go back.

I basically approach everything as "How do I reward the good behaviour?" And when she does something undesirable, I think "How is she being rewarded for this? What's she getting out of it?"

With those questions as my foundation, I'm finding it easier to problem solve, meaning each new issue that pops up (there's always something) is less likely to overwhelm me.

So applying this philosophy to crate training, I would no longer let a puppy cry it out without rewarding them in some way once they've stopped. If puppy stops crying and still finds herself alone in the dark, what has she learned? Perhaps that crying accomplishes nothing. Or perhaps that crying is comforting when she's scared.

I'd personally prefer she learn that settling quietly = good things.

Of course, some dogs just have wonderful, easygoing temperaments, and they'll roll with whatever you throw at them. But poodles have good memories and will stun you with their capacity for learning.....for better or worse. ;)
I"m married to a psychologist. I sometimes wonder if our marriage has been based on his using positive and negative reinforcement on me.

When I ask, he just frowns. ; )
 

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Discussion Starter #26
That makes sense, she didn't seem too vocal when we visited so I'm hoping that'll continue but I doubt it haha. She was quite happy to go off on her own exploring though so fingers crossed. Thanks again for all the advice, I'll post the results after the first night!
 

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Hi all,
We have a standard poodle puppy coming home with us in a few weeks time so we're starting to plan how to tackle the first few days.
We can't decide whether to leave the puppy downstairs in the crate for the first night or whether it should be upstairs with us. Apparently the latter is more common now?
We're happy to get up to let it outside every few hours overnight as we have the week off work. Eventually we want her to sleep downstairs in her bed for the duration of the night.
Just wondering if anyone here has left theirs downstairs away from them on the first night and how it went?
Thanks!
Ours stayed in or near our bed. No crate. We could feel him stir when he needed out. Never an accident and never cried. After a week he was sleeping 10 hours without waking! At one year he sleeps soundly near us.
 

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When we got our current poodle, the breeder said to have her sleep between our heads for the first night so she would know who her pack is. Second night she slept in her crate in our bedroom with no problems. The breeder also sent us home with a small floppy flat-stuffed animal, which smells like her home. It is Karma's binky. She has had it for seven years now. Congrats on your new puppy!
 

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Hi all,
We have a standard poodle puppy coming home with us in a few weeks time so we're starting to plan how to tackle the first few days.
We can't decide whether to leave the puppy downstairs in the crate for the first night or whether it should be upstairs with us. Apparently the latter is more common now?
We're happy to get up to let it outside every few hours overnight as we have the week off work. Eventually we want her to sleep downstairs in her bed for the duration of the night.
Just wondering if anyone here has left theirs downstairs away from them on the first night and how it went?
Thanks!
We brought our first standard poodle puppy home at 10 weeks. The breeder told us to line the big crate (for the grown up st. poodle) with newspaper and leave her there alone. But our little girl disagreed and very loudly. I spent more time cleaning up after her and taking her out, then I was in bed. But, since breeder instructed us, we followed. No one could sleep in the whole house for 3-4 nights. I couldn’t imagine that a tiny puppy could pee that much. Since getting a st. poodle puppy was my long-standing dream, I took care of her. My husband and son were loved the puppy, but it was getting to the point, that I’d be moved downstairs for the night...
I was doing laundry and left an empty, rectangular laundry basket on the floor in the room. During the day, it was easy to allow poppy to wander where I was. Something got my attention, but then I heard a helpless squick. She made her way into the basket, while it was on its side, but as she moved, the basket turned and she ended up inside. She stood on her hind legs, but couldn’t get out. I helped her out. The same day, a neighbor, when I shared our nightly predicament, told me that puppy was taken from her mother and her siblings by us. She may not perceive us as her “ family” yet, but is scared of being alone downstairs, in the kennel. I told her about the laundry basket. She advised me to line the bottom of laundry basket with old towel, put there stuffed toy, large enough, to cover an old fashioned, portable clock. Ticking of the clock, may remind her of mother’s heartbeat; being in the laundry basket, she can’t get out, but can be with us in the room. I did as planned. Surprise! Puppy nestled next to the teddy bear in the basket and slept peacefully till ~ 4-5 am, at which point, she got on her hind legs and squeaked. I quickly took her downstairs and outside. Overnight, she got potty trained. The only problem was that she figured out to which door (leading to the stairs to 1st floor) she must come, but was too small to walk down the stairs. So, for a while, I/we carried her, but as she got a bit bigger, we trained her to walk the stairs. Her water bawl and food balls were downstairs, so she learned where to go to drink, eat and to ask to go out. In a few months, she learned that the house had 2 doors and she can lead us to either one, asking to go.
There are various schools of thought, regarding keeping the dog downstairs, but our girl got trained beginning at 6 mos., and never got on the furniture or beds. She was allowed to walk free throughout the house, even when we were out. We have our 2nd standard poodle, this one was adopted and was abused. I trained her basic commands, but she has severe separation anxiety and certain fears (from the previous owners), that we have to make allowances for. But we never kept either of the dogs on a separate floor.
 

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Hi all,
We have a standard poodle puppy coming home with us in a few weeks time so we're starting to plan how to tackle the first few days.
We can't decide whether to leave the puppy downstairs in the crate for the first night or whether it should be upstairs with us. Apparently the latter is more common now?
We're happy to get up to let it outside every few hours overnight as we have the week off work. Eventually we want her to sleep downstairs in her bed for the duration of the night.
Just wondering if anyone here has left theirs downstairs away from them on the first night and how it went?
Thanks!
I’ve never left one of my puppies alone. ESP first night. I actually put the crate on my bed right next to me. One of the joys of having a dog is snuggle time at night. If that’s not your thing, I would do a Very slow transition or consider a different breed. Poodles don’t do well with too much alone time and you’ll open the door for neurotic behaviors potentially.
 

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All of my dogs, including fosters, have slept in my bedroom. For the young ones the crate is right next to my bed. Can’t imagine leaving them downstairs alone.
I agree! Mine are my babies and I want them in the room with me. My little guy sleeps on our bed and my Spoo still sleeps in her crate, beside my bed, but I don’t close or lock the door anymore (she will be 2 in late September). I was lucky enough to have an awesome breeder who started crate training prior to me picking her up (she was almost 10 weeks old when I picked her up) and she never even cried, as we had her baby blanket with siblings and mama’s smell on it. Definitely have to start slow and make sure they know the crate is their safe place, not for punishment.
 
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