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Discussion Starter #1
Once again, I was disappointed, after not getting a dog. I’d been waiting and something happened again. There are certain things that I’d like to see in a breeder. That is, there are certain health-related issues. I want a breeder that does more natural rearing, with minimal vaccines, doesn’t have a specofic soay/neuter time period or doesn’t necessarily advocate traditional spay/neuter, and doesn’t only feed kibble.

There aren’t too many and because I don’t want certain colors it’s not easy. I’m bored and depressed. It’s over two years bow looking. Because I was on a waiting list, now I have to get on other lists but because I’m late again for these lists, I probably won’t get a dog. Plus, getting a dog in the winter isn’t ideal with flu season.
 

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I am sorry you ‘re having such a hard time. I know how wanting a dog and expecting it’s arrival is exciting and how much disappointment it can bring when it doesn’t happen.

We all want the perfect dog that we build in our minds from the perfect breeder, but it’s not always possible. In fact, it’s hardly ever possible.

When I start looking for a dog, my list of criterias is very long. Then I start looking and within 2-3 months, I generally have a dog to call my own. The thing is the more I look around and talk to people, the more some criterias just become less important, like color, or even sex. And size, a little bit. And perfect conformation (minor flaws are not okay at first but then become superficial). Age also, I can be flexible on if need be.

Once you get your new dog, none of the superficial criterias, or if the breeder fed kibble or not, matter. You will love the dog for its personality, no matter what the rest is. The only thing that you can’t let go of are criterias related to health. You need a good healthy puppy from healthy parents.

When you’re older, would you rather think of all the dear memories you had with your unperfect dog, or think about all the years you spent missing having a dog ?

Just something to think about. Life is short. Live it !
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
S---- happens. A lot of the time, it does happen to me. I won't go into it but I did not manifest the things that have happened in my life. They just happened. I have medical problems that I have to work around. Other people may not like it but I don't have a choice. I'm used to having these issues interfere with my plans or having to adjust them accordingly but other people aren't.
There are things in my life that I have to live with, whether I like them or not. I don't have the luxuries (not material) that others have. It's a product of having the medical problems that I have. However, given that I do have these problems, I have always had pets to make things a little better and there has never been a time when they were compromised in any way by those problems. I can't do everything I'd like to do in life. That's why I want a dog. Because there are things that I can do.
Having witnessed the things that I have in life, I have empirical evidence refuting the self-fulfilling prophecy.
 

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The natural rearing (puppy culture? Rule of 7s?) and limited vaccines (Jean Dodds’ protocol) are common among responsible breeders. Requiring spay/neuter of dogs that are not co-owned/breeding dogs is also the norm, preferred after the benefits of hormones to bone growth are realized (1 year or after a female’s first heat). It makes sense that a breeder wants to support healthy development and then retain control of genetic material by requiring spay/neuter.

I’m not sure what your food requirment is but, my breeder recommended a food brand ‘or equal,’ meaning a high quality food, to follow what she provided for the puppies. This offers a choice, and I’ve transitioned my dog to different foods, as you could if you don’t prefer what a breeder has raised a puppy on.

It is difficult to find that first puppy, before obtaining poodle street cred (my words). I walked away from the process 18 years ago and ended up with my first shelter dog. I didn’t like being interviewed by breeders to see if I was a good prospective home. After all, I grew up with poodles. Of course I knew what was required!

I was committed to finding a poodle this time around and was very lucky at the timing. I’m a strong supporter of new owner screening in order to place puppies in only the best homes. As a Humane Society foster home, it was just as important to me that the pound puppies that I lavished care and love on moved on to responsible owners. Many rescues also employ strict requirements, including home visits.

I hope that you find the pup that is meant for you and can look back on this time as the hurdles needed to be jumped to find the perfect companion.
 

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I hope you are feeling a little better today Mish17.
I thought I had done good research and chose a breeder that was what I thought I wanted, but I see now I was influenced a lot by people around me. I felt guilty for not getting a rescue dog as that was the comment I got over and over. I was lucky to get a great poodle in the end and he seems healthy — he’s definitely not a show dog! I also wouldn’t agree to some of the things in the contract (wanted him neutered too early) but there are other variables I could let go (colour etc.)
My point is I have evolved and I would never pick the same poodle breeder again, despite getting a good dog. Is there anything you can prioritize so that you have more choices in breeders? I’m not sure if that would help or not. I also acknowledge that you are just disappointed and I hope whatever happens, you will get a dog soon! I know you will be happy with him/her when you get him/her:)
Jen and Sage
 

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I highly recommend checking out Danube Poodles on the east coast, if you live nearby there (she isn’t keen on her dogs flying). She is extremely natural and caring with her dogs, believes in holistic vet care, delayed and minimum vaccines, and raw food. She really cares.

https://www.danubepoodles.com/about
 

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If you want a great dog, you have to get in line. That’s the way it is. Isn’t it so often the case that anticipation is a big part of the celebration? Hope you find the perfect puppy in due course.
 

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If I had stuck to my desires of color and sex I would never have ended up with the awesome dog I have! When I let those requirements go and stuck to health and temperament I found my wonderful spoo. I am pretty sure I said this quite awhile ago.
 

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I have two absolutely amazing poodle breeders within 10 miles of me and I still had to wait 9+ months to get my puppy. And I did make compromises on color and a few other things. But I couldn’t be happier with what ended up happening. Just put in applications with as many reputable breeders are possible. Get on many waiting lists. I hope you get a perfect puppy for you someday and at that point the wait will all have been worth it.
 

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I have been looking for two weeks for a standard. After researching I have found at least 4 different good prospects (breeders with one or more available puppies) although only one is a color I want. While I may still be looking in a month, that will be my choice because I held out for a particular color and even then there are 2 breeders that I know of that have puppies coming, some of whom should be the color I am seeking. I am sorely tempted by the breeders I have spoken to because at least 3 of them have a dog with the personality I am seeking and I ask if I really would not rather have the right dog which may be the wrong color?

As for raw food and vaccination protocols, once you have your dog, you will feed him or her what you want to feed him and you will vaccinate him however you and your vet think best and I would not get bent out of shape about it. If anything I have found the opposite, they all want you to promise to feed raw food and follow anything Dr. Dodd says
 

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I agree with you Saphire...I had wanted a particular color...didn't happen....but really I don't care any longer. As far as food and vaccinations...well once you own the dog its really your call. Neutering/spaying...I don't have a problem with, in fact AKC now offers limited registration...The breeder can give you your AKC papers to register the dog but It will be registered on a spay neuter and the dog could never be used in AKC as a breeder. Some breeders will hold the papers until you neuter and many now agree with the later protocol of spay/neuter. There are also rescues out there. My friend just adopted a very nice standard, obedience trained, neutered and under 2 years old. I think if you really want a dog/puppy there are plenty out there and many have been decently bred. Once you have your puppy you will follow the beliefs you have. There are also plenty of dogs/puppies that would love to be adopted from local shelters/and or rescues.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well, I guess what makes it worse, is that the dog I missed out on was everything I wanted in a breeder and a dog-color, personality, feeding, vaccines. It just didn't work out because there was something we couldn't settle upon.
Yes, there are a couple of Standards out there now but either the colors or feeding and/or spay neuter requirements are not all there, as they were with the pup I really wanted. I guess I'm having a very difficult time getting over it because it seemed to be the ideal dog. There is one breeder that checks all the boxes and that may have puppies in the near future but I don't know how far down I am on the list.
My only concern with changing to raw or a different food, is that, breeders know how to feed certain diets and adjust them, as necessary. I don't. I would like to be able to refer to someone if I have questions or concerns about it.
 

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Feeding and changing foods is not rocket science. Much of that is preference and common sense. I have had dogs for 64 yrs now and never had a breeder tell me what I had to feed a dog. I would not ever buy from a breeder who said I had to feed specific foods or suppliments. A dog's needs and food tolerances can change over time and one person's opinion on food, ie. breeder, may not always be appropriate for every single dog they have produced.

Back in my childhood days we fed "grocery store brands." There were not many food choices back then. Our dogs were healthy and lived long lives. Now we have lots of healthy food choices, sometimes too many choices, which can be confusing. I am lucky that I worked in the pet food business for a few years, attended many different training seminars and feel like I can sort through the marketing B.S. And select great foods. Also, with the internet we have other resources we can access.

My breeder of Poppy generally requires pets to be spayed/neutered by one year of age. I explained that I wanted to wait longer in order to give Poppy the advantages of having her hormones while completing bone growth, etc. The breeder did not give me any trouble over that at all. It was a reasonable request. I did notify her when Poppy had her spay surgery and emailed her proof from the vet, but she did not require that of me, nor did she even request it.

We honestly did not discuss vaccination protocol. Puppy vaccinations and Rabies vaccination were completed by the breeder. What I do for vaccinations going forward is up to me.

I hope you find a breeder with whom you can work, and find the puppy that you want. Good luck.
 

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I would also add that sometimes a poodle just happens out of the blue and totally unexpected.

I'm a total poodle snob, I started with akc show poodles when I was 16, believe me, I have very high expectations when it comes to poodles and I have done the long road of finding breeders, researching breeders and then being very selective of the pup I chose. And this was all before the computer age which made things take even longer.

No one was more surprised than I when I took a severely abused shelter dog, he didn't have a single quality I wanted and hit every single mark I didn't want. If I had stuck to my list of what a poodle should be than I would have missed 10 years of this beautiful soul.

And he taught me an important lesson. When it came time to look for another standard, I did make sure the breeder was responsible although she was not a show breeder, just someone who loves poodles and made sure her dogs were healthy, both genetically and physically. And when I went to look at her pups, I didn't pick the best quality, I picked the one that best suited my lifestyle, a very laid back pup for a older lady. I now have Roland, now 10 months old, the apple of my eye and the perfect fit for me.

In short, be patient, let it happen, your poodle is out there somewhere, just maybe not where you expect it to be.
 

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Mish, it is very difficult to let go of “the perfect puppy” that has not worked out and hard not to compare every puppy moving forward to that puppy. That puppy will remain perfect in your mind, since it was everything you wanted. I had this happen to me with a litter that was completely spoken for, but was absolute perfection. I spent hours researching the parents and all of the dogs in the pedigree, and imagining bringing one of those puppies home with me, but it wasn’t meant to be. I think that is why it took so long to then get my eventual puppy, because my standards were so high after that. However I did compromise on color and a few other things and while I still prefer my favorite color silver over my girl’s color who is white, her dynamite personality is everything I could ever want in a dog and I love her dearly. I am not suggesting that you should compromise anywhere, just trying to give hope that it may work out yet and you will be happy you waited. I used my wait time to do a ton of research on training and I am so glad that I did because early on in my search I had planned to use a certain training style, but found out that there was a better way, so I really started off on a better foot with the new puppy!
 

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IAssuming you are looking for a standard, I am looking for a standard, I have had a couple of good leads and some that you will have to investigate, assuming you are looking on the East Coast or are willing to drive there I can give you information on the ones I have found. I have had a few ask about a raw diet on the puppy application, to me that is a negative but something I am willing to consider. What colors are you willing to accept, male or female, what geographic area?

Get a holistic vet. As for mentoring, make friends with the breeders you contact who mention raw diet on their application, if they end up selling you a puppy, great, if not but you like each other, no reason you cannot keep in touch
 
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