Poodle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 5 month old toy poodle who is always near me but whenever I try to pick her up or go near her, she runs away. At first it was cute, but now it's a nuisance. She loves going for walks, but when I try to get her to put on her leash, she runs away. Then she comes right back to me. At first I thought she was playing, but now it's 24/7. Anyone have this same problem? Solutions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,645 Posts
I'd say get some yummy treats she likes and call her to you randomly and when she shows up give her a treat and say good girl and pick her up. Then put her down and ignore her. Later call her to you and give her a treat and pick her up and say good girl. Eventually she'll equate being called to you with something very good and being picked up is just nothing important or to be scared of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,686 Posts
This should be in the training section. You might want to have Todd move it.

Your dog is dictating when and where you handle her. This is not OK and it is a safety issue. I would recommend tethering. You can read about this on the Internet.

Also, it seems to me that you have no recall. When you call your dog, it needs to come. However, it does no good to give a command you can not enforce and that you can not treat. To start this training she needs to be on a leash anytime she is out of her crate, even in the house (she can drag her leash around if she is supervised).

Numerous times a day you need to practice the recall. Make sure you have the end of the leash/line. Say your dog's name, followed by the come command. Just a note about this.... some people choose to use a word other than "Come" because they want a distinct word that can not be confused with anything else. Some people use "Front" or "Aqui". The idea is that when you say this word, your dog drops whatever it is that it is doing, and high-tails it back to you, ultimately coming and sitting nicely in front of you close enough that you can bend down and touch/handle it.

So anyway.... Say, "Fluffy Come!" in a happy up-beat voice. If she starts to come, reel her in and PARTY PARTY PRAISE! With small dogs it is a good idea to give the treat around the back and in between your calves. This gets the dog used to coming in close and between your feet.

If your dog ignores you, give it a collar pop and reel it in again PARTY PARTy PRAISE and a treat between the legs.

Your Poodle will learn quickly that if she comes, she will get a reward and if she does not come, she will get a correction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,293 Posts
I second cbrand's advice, I really like tethering!

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
I have been having the same problem with Mercury. He loves being with me but when I go toward him to put a leash on him, groom him, pet him, he moves away from me ask if Im going to hurt him so Im glad I found this thread. Since he is a standard how do I treat him? Still between my legs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,155 Posts
I second all that Cbrand said !!!!

"Come" command is one of the MOST important ones in so many ways !!!! It can save your dog's life one day !

I also agree that leash during training is essential now that your dog is into a habit of running away. He is not a baby any more and real obedience training has to start as soon as possible.

It will make your dog's and your life so much easier and enjoyable in any situation or environment : ))) ! Your dog will feel more confident and calm knowing that he has a strong "pack leader" ; ) !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Recall, Recall, Recall . . . it's a real brain buster . . .

Remember a couple of important points:


  1. Never give a command to a pup in which you are not able to back up immediately. E.G. If you teach sit, make sure you are there to immediately enforce the sit. If you are teaching recall (come!), then make sure you have a leash (6' or longer) enforce the recall. Do this until you are absolutely confident . . . then add a couple of months to be sure!
  2. Each command is given ONLY once . . . a small pause . . . enforce gently! Give a treat . . . huge praise . . . My Std. Poodle female is always thanked profusely for doing her business outside - she's been house trained for some time . . .they can't get enough of it!
    1. You say why? Well imagine it from his/her perspective . . . how many times are you going to say 'come' until you really want it too happen? Could it be that "come ... come ... come ... - damn it dog get over here . . ." is part of the command . . or is just 'come'? or is spoken twice? How is s/he supposed to know? Remember who the instructor and who the student is(or, well is supposed to be anyway)!
    2. If you reward (or neg reinforcement) for a variety of 'commands' expecting a single outcome, this isn't fair! Consistency and predictability go a long way! Don't be unfair - s/he counts on YOU to ensure that commands are taught in an even-handed and consistent fashion.
  3. Have fun!!!! Smile laugh carry on etc etc . . . it really is a blast!
  4. I will tell you a terrible secret, I've trained Mastiffs to a high-level (192/200 AKC all breed, he upped up on standards, borders and etc) . . . all 200+lbs fully intact male . . . patience is a virtue . . and I never ever had an organized lesson @ the house - ever. Why? Because I never stop training . . . my entire waking interaction with my dogs is training - period. They must sit correctly before entering and exiting the front door, wait to have their collars taken off, sit before dinner, front for treat (hey, I work for a living - so can they!) . . .the list goes on and on . . . When in Pet Smart, healing is done . . . whatever . . . The only 'organized' lessons are at where I trained . . . Some will cringe at this advice, but someone with 5+ OTCHs' gave me this tidbit of advice . . . never(no 5 to 5:30pm schedules etc)/always(training is communications - treat it that way - always talk to you dog) train at home!
OTCH == Obedience Trial Champion . . . It's like PhD in dog training-ology! One is phenom . . . 5 is out of this world . . . and yes there are those who have more than that! Sheesh . . . I'd just settle for a stink'n little UDX (no small matter itself!)

Mark, Jamie and The Poodle Gangsters!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,645 Posts
I still praise Harry when he potties. I don't make a big deal but I say "good potty Harry." I just think it's always good to provide some kind of positive reinforcement to something you tell them to do when they do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,881 Posts
Looks like a lot of great, sound advice! I agree with it all.

After I teach my dogs to come on command in controlled situations-as stated above-, I let them off leash for a walk in the woods (that is the first place I let off leash as there are no distractions and I can work with them), I take a whole bunch of small treats with me and call them back to me periodically. When they turn to look I praise them and call in a happy tone... as soon as they get to me they get a treat, a very happy sounding 'good boy/girl', a good scratch on the head and then an 'ok,go' to let them know they can go off again. I do this with each of them and then all of them together. I can let Grace off leash anywhere, including in public parking lots and she will stay near me and come as soon as I call her. I can let Ivy and Chantel off leash also, but both are young still and can be distracted by wanting someone to pet them, so they won't be allowed total off leash in public like Grace until they are older and I am sure of their complete control. It is such a safety issue, all dogs should learn to come when called, even if they don't learn any other obedience training.

I always tell anyone that asks me how I get all of my girls to behave so well when they are out and they all come when called... training, training, training, and ALWAYS POSITIVE training! Set them up to "win" by doing things in small steps, not advancing to the next step till they are ready, and always willing to take a step back if needed, and, of course, lots of praising and you will have a happy, willing companion! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
Recall, Recall, Recall...

This is a great thread I'm glad I found it.

I have a Male Toy Poodle that was a gift/rescue that has only been with me 6 weeks. I don't know Guido's history so I'm learning as I go with him. I have held off on training him because he was sick with kennel cough and a really bad bladder infection (blood in urine) I didn't want to push him while he was ill and not sure of his new surroundings. But other than his night incontinence issue I feel I need to start training him now.

All and all he is a great dog except he doesn't 'come' on command. He knows his new name I gave him. I have tried treats and he acts like he could care less. When I give him a 'Guido come!" command he looks at me like he's a dumb-dumb and doesn't have a clue what to do or I'm speaking a language he doesn't understand. I know he is a very smart dog. Again as a rescue I don't know how his previous owner trained him and the commands they used. I have had many dogs over the years, all breeds, mostly Spoo's and I've never had a dog that can't do the simplest command as 'come'.

As I read the posting on this tread I'm wondering if I need to do the command with him on a leach/tethering? And gently pull him towards me on the 'come' command so he'll understand what it is I am wanting him to do? - - - Or when he's outside in the fenced yard, and I call him to come in and he does 'come' I need to praise him a lot and give him a treat?

markfsanderson -- Thanks for all the valuable info.

You are so right about "come ... come ... come ... - damn it dog get over here . . ." I end up closing the front door in front of him because he stand there dumbfounded when I say "Guido come!" as I'm walking out the door, I close the door in front of him, he barks at the door for me to open it and then when I open it he comes. Silly game, isn't it?

It is true its constant training all day every day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,686 Posts
As I read the posting on this tread I'm wondering if I need to do the command with him on a leach/tethering? And gently pull him towards me on the 'come' command so he'll understand what it is I am wanting him to do? - - - Or when he's outside in the fenced yard, and I call him to come in and he does 'come' I need to praise him a lot and give him a treat?
.
He should NEVER be off leash either in the house or in the yard. He needs to drag a long line around. This way, you can pick up the end, call him and if he does not respond immediately, you can give him a collar pop. As he starts to come in PRAISE PRAISE PRAISE for being so smart and good. Give him a treat when he comes in close and is right in front of you (don't move into him, let him come to you.... back up if anything to keep him coming in).

If there is no consequence for non-compliance, then he will just blow you off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,905 Posts
I tried "charging up" the word come kind of like you charge up a clicker before you actually use it. So I was sitting on the couch with Teddy sitting next to me and I would say "come" and then give him a treat right away. It seemed to help him make an association between the word and the treat, which has helped tremendously outside where there are plenty of distractions. Sometimes he gets fixated on a bird or something and I have to pull so hard to reel him in that I feel like I'm abusing him. It's frustrating, but we're working on it and I'm seeing progress little by little. With no distractions, his recall is great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,686 Posts
Sometimes he gets fixated on a bird or something and I have to pull so hard to reel him in that I feel like I'm abusing him.
Instead of pulling, try short, hard, staccato pops. I find the more I pull, the more the dog leans pulls against me. I used to ride horses and the same thing is true there which is why in dressage you use a series of half halts to shift a horse's center of balance and to adjust speed. If you keep a steady pull, the horse just gets heavier and heavier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,905 Posts
Thanks, I'll try that. When he leans like that, it feels like he weighs about 50 pounds instead of 12. It's actually kind of amazing that he can do that, no matter how frustrating it is for me. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,686 Posts
Thanks, I'll try that. When he leans like that, it feels like he weighs about 50 pounds instead of 12. It's actually kind of amazing that he can do that, no matter how frustrating it is for me. :)
Ah yes... in our house we call that Zen dog. Rudi our Poodle mix was only 7 lbs but if he was on the bed and in a spot he wanted, he could make himself weigh 50lbs at least! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
The Tao of Poodle - or seven steps to canine nirvana!

Hello!
Thanks for the kind words!

. . ." I end up closing the front door in front of him because he stand there dumbfounded when I say "Guido come!" as I'm walking out the door, I close the door in front of him, he barks at the door for me to open it and then when I open it he comes. Silly game, isn't it? .
Just make absolutely sure that you do NOT open the door immediately . . . just wait a random amount of time from 2 to 10 minutes and then open it. Guido missed his opportunity . . . he'll just have to wait for the next one!.

I think that pros' call it 'oppositional reflex' . . . If you push, your 'pushee' will push back! That's also related to why you never run towards an escaping dog outside, but you call to it in a playful tone and start skipping off in the direction you want him/her to go . . . Almost guaranteed to work every time. Clap your hands and make like over here is the funnest place around . . .

Remember - these are poodles. They are smart devils, and will make a fool of you if you don't catch on quick. He's probably testing testing 1 2 3 to see what you are made of . . . Mine do some scary things that make you really wonder about how smart they really are . . .

Therefore, if I where you I'd:

1) Make him sit before going outside with you. Do not ever let him go first outside through a door way - you go first - not him.
2) Make him sit before dinner time (hey, all of us must have manners - correct?). He is not to eat when you put the bowl down, only when you let him after you put the bowl down. If you need to physically hold him then do so . . you can also use a leash. Also make sure that you can pick up and inspect the dog dish while they are eating, and that you are able to repo bones that they are chewing on for inspection. This can save your dogs life.
3) When walking in the neighborhood, make him sit when you stop to tie your shoes, cross an intersection (this might just save your dogs life).
4) Make sure he is kennel trained. This takes advantage of a deep canine denning instinct. They feel SAFE in a kennel, mine choose to go there as its their 'bedroom'. Never use it as a punishment. This can also save your dogs life, as if s/he is ever injured, you can control his movements in an environment that they feel safe in (read lower heart rate, relaxed, good for trauma I'm assuming . . . ), and you can travel with them, and board them, and . . . you get the picture.
5) I can't remember - is he a toy or a mini? If he is a toy, never ever ever under any circumstance carry him around. Don't do the baby carriage thing (women are particularly susceptible to this behavior - sorry if I offend), or hold him up on your same face level. Let him walk - he's got legs! Remember, when you put a canine (it doesn't matter the size) at the same level as you - over a period of time they will begin to believe that you are their peer. This is bad - you must be leader - period.
6) Belly scratches. This will make your dog feel great! Scritchies feel good . . . and are mandatory at random times through out the day. S/he must roll on their back and accept a tummy rub. They must also accept inspection of their toes, ears, eyes, mouth and etc. Again - this can save their life - its not designed to be 'dominant' - its meant for you to be the leader so you can ensure his safety.
7) They must accept being groomed . . . got to brush a poodle . . even a buzzed one need it pretty often.

Will you be able to do all of these things from day 1? Maybe . . but probably not . . .They are good goals though!

Good Luck!

Mark, Jamie and The Poodle Gangsters!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
Today I worked with him on the 'Guido come' command. He did very well with a lot of praise. I think its all newness on both our parts. He really wants to please me.

I did make him sit and wait for dinner and again when I was filling his bowl with water. I only had to tell him once to sit and stay, then I released him from the command on 'okay' and he got up and went to his bowl.

I'm going to work with him on the outside points you made as each day passes.

I don't have a kennel to kennel trained him. I have used that method with all my other Spoos I had over the years. We called it 'the condo' cause it was a really x-large airline kennel as big as some NYC condo's. :laugh: My cousin said she'll bring a small old kennel she has over next time she stops by and I will begin using it. Because I don't have a kennel/cage I do use the bathroom to isolate both Guido or Goomba when they have been bad (so to speak). We call it 'the bad-room' not the bathroom. I will discipline them tell them why they are bad and put them in there for a period of time. With Goomba it has been very very effective. But I will go back to kennel training.

Guido is a Toy. I'm not big on carrying him. I do very rarely.

Belly scratches he loves also...

He is very very good at baths, grooming and getting his nail trimmed and is feet buzzed with the clippers. I cut his hair and restyled his hair for the first time last week. He was as calm and cool as a cucumber, he enjoyed every minute of it. When I was through he pranced around like my Spoo's would do like they were going to a dog show. When I got him from the humane society he was groomed with a beautiful puppy cut. Whoever owned him took very good care of him it was very obvious.

Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
My sister n law has a Papillon that does this. He is 6 now and still does it. He'll come to you, jump on your leg like he wants you to pick him up, but when you got to pick him up he jumps back. With him it seems more like a fear than a bad behavior. it's not that he won't come, he just panics when that hand is coming towards him? Is that what your poo is doing?
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top