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My standard, only 6 years old, appears to be developing heart disease. The vet said she could have a cardiologist confirm and consult. I looked up to see if her dog food was implicated in the recent reports. In doing that i stumbled on an apparently ‘known’ issue with lamb and rice and certain dogs and heart disease. Since my dear Sophie is allergic to all poultry i had been feeding her lamb and rice for 5 years!

I am in search of a dry dog food which has no poultry, is not lamb and rice and is not grain free, ie dont want the potato or legume types. Any suggestions? Cannot have any chicken whatsoever.

Suggestions appreciated. Also would like to hear if you have had any experience with these diet related heart problems.
 

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Your vet was wise to suggest a cardiac consult. I belong to a facebook group which is run mostly by veterianarians and veterinary nutritionists....this group addresses the DCM issues caused by nutrition issues. The group of veterinarians, cardiologists and nutritionists suggest choosing foods which are made by companies which follow WSAVA guidelines for manufacturing foods, which employ full time veterinary nutritionists to formulate foods and which do long term feeding trials to ensure that dogs are healthy while eating these diets.

The companies which are recommended are Purina, Royal Canin, Iams, Eukanuba,and Hills Science Diet. As long as you chose a grain inclusive diet from one of these companies the food will be both nutritious and safe and healthy to feed.

I feed my Poppy Purina Pro Plan Sport and chose it because it is formulated for sporting, working and very active dogs. The one she eats is chicken based, however there is a Pro Plan Sport Sensitive Skin and Coat formula which is salmon based, and it has absolutely no chicken products in it. A tremendous number of people whose dogs have food allergy issues have had great results feeding this formula.

Poppy had no issues with transitioning to her Pro Plan and LOVES IT. She has been eating it for 7 months and is fit as well as has an insanely thick and lush coat.

I have found that Petsmart carries this as well as Chewy. Chewy has the best prices and if you have an order of $49 it ships for free in 2 days. Petsmart will match Chewy prices. A 37.5 lb bag lasts Poppy 94 days and at 2 cups per day, she is 45 lbs, the cost is $ .48 per day to feed!

Pro Plan Focus also has a Salmon Sensitive Skin and Coat formula which contains no chicken and it is a lower protein percentage than the Sport version. You might look at this one and compare it with the Sport version. It would depend on your girl's activity level. Poppy is lean and fit and maintained her weight when we switched food to PPP Sport....she neither gained nor lost weight.

I hope this is helpful....feel free to ask questions.

I wish you well with the cardiology tests and hope your girl recovers quickly.

While Poppy does not have DCM or any other cardiology problems I made the food change out of an abundance of caution. I was comfortable changing to Purina because we started feeding our family dogs Purina in 1954 and fed Purina until 2001. All of our dogs had long and healthy lives without any major illness or injuries. I strayed away to grain free foods in 2001 and now am back feeding Purina and grain inclusive foods. I am comfortable with how they manufacture and test their formulas.

Many dogs who have been diagnosed early with DCM have had successful recoveries with change of diet and supportive medications, as long as the damage to the heart is not too severe. DCM which is inherited in some breeds, not standard poodles, do NOT recover with change of diet, however medications can make them more comfortable for the duration of their lives. You might want to join the facebook group Taurine-Deficient (Nutritional) Dialated Cardiomyopathy. It is run by veterinarians, is science and fact based and is very helpful and supportive. It can be overwhelming to read all the information posted in the group, however, if your girl does have this the group will be an invaluable resource.
 

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VQ, thank you again. I am rereading your post. I will get a small bag of the salmon based food you suggest. When we first discovered the chicken allergy, we tried a salmon based food and herself didnt like it much. She liked the natural balance lamb and rice best and it seemed to get rid of all her symptoms. Who knew there was another issue to consider. I will try this one though and see how it goes. Originally i had decided to take a wait and see til September but having read about the lamb and rice issue i am going to try to schedule the apt today though it may not be til september. I am also going to switch her food immediately.

Here is another question. Sophie is our second poodle and fourth dog dog in my adult life (it is one at a time each for a long life happily). We have always fed a dry dog food with a generous amount of meat from the table. No cake or pizza, but meat. This seemed to work fine. The last poodle lived to 14 and was very active til 13. I am wondering if given this issue it might be wise to just increase the ratio of meat and if so, is a variety good ? Seems like variety of food minimizes these kinds of risks. Is the meat that i eat really bad for my dog or is that a myth if the dogfood industry? The dogs seem to approve.
 

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My standard, only 6 years old, appears to be developing heart disease. The vet said she could have a cardiologist confirm and consult. I looked up to see if her dog food was implicated in the recent reports. In doing that i stumbled on an apparently ‘known’ issue with lamb and rice and certain dogs and heart disease. Since my dear Sophie is allergic to all poultry i had been feeding her lamb and rice for 5 years!

I am in search of a dry dog food which has no poultry, is not lamb and rice and is not grain free, ie dont want the potato or legume types. Any suggestions? Cannot have any chicken whatsoever.

Suggestions appreciated. Also would like to hear if you have had any experience with these diet related heart problems.
I would take her to a cardiologist for an echocardiogram and then pursue taurine testing if DCM is suggested. Diet wise, have you tried Purina Pro Plan Sensitive Skin and Stomach?
 

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No i havent, are either of those better than lamb and rice for the taurine situation? Ie is it the rice or the lamb that is not good, or is it only the combination?
 

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No i havent, are either of those better than lamb and rice for the taurine situation? Ie is it the rice or the lamb that is not good, or is it only the combination?
It's not known exactly what is causing nutritionally mediated DCM right now, but it seems to be associated with foods with a high legume content. Unfortunately loading super expensive foods with peas and legumes has become a trend over the last several years...In the past, I do believe it was also associated with lamb and rice diets. If you've been feeding lamb and rice, I'd find something else, preferably a food that does not currently have a high incidence of DCM, if a cardiologist confirms DCM and/or low taurine and advises you to do so. There's also other causes of heart issues, so I would definitely visit with a specialist before making any changes!

https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/news-events/fda-investigation-potential-link-between-certain-diets-and-canine-dilated-cardiomyopathy?fbclid=IwAR3qXElDpUgacgzYXLFtnt-luLmgpwiuNsluq1ulRkLZ9HRwsPwnsAKK7tw#diet
 

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Your vet was wise to suggest a cardiac consult. I belong to a facebook group which is run mostly by veterianarians and veterinary nutritionists....this group addresses the DCM issues caused by nutrition issues. The group of veterinarians, cardiologists and nutritionists suggest choosing foods which are made by companies which follow WSAVA guidelines for manufacturing foods, which employ full time veterinary nutritionists to formulate foods and which do long term feeding trials to ensure that dogs are healthy while eating these diets.

The companies which are recommended are Purina, Royal Canin, Iams, Eukanuba,and Hills Science Diet. As long as you chose a grain inclusive diet from one of these companies the food will be both nutritious and safe and healthy to feed.

I feed my Poppy Purina Pro Plan Sport and chose it because it is formulated for sporting, working and very active dogs. The one she eats is chicken based, however there is a Pro Plan Sport Sensitive Skin and Coat formula which is salmon based, and it has absolutely no chicken products in it. A tremendous number of people whose dogs have food allergy issues have had great results feeding this formula.

Poppy had no issues with transitioning to her Pro Plan and LOVES IT. She has been eating it for 7 months and is fit as well as has an insanely thick and lush coat.

I have found that Petsmart carries this as well as Chewy. Chewy has the best prices and if you have an order of $49 it ships for free in 2 days. Petsmart will match Chewy prices. A 37.5 lb bag lasts Poppy 94 days and at 2 cups per day, she is 45 lbs, the cost is $ .48 per day to feed!

Pro Plan Focus also has a Salmon Sensitive Skin and Coat formula which contains no chicken and it is a lower protein percentage than the Sport version. You might look at this one and compare it with the Sport version. It would depend on your girl's activity level. Poppy is lean and fit and maintained her weight when we switched food to PPP Sport....she neither gained nor lost weight.

I hope this is helpful....feel free to ask questions.

I wish you well with the cardiology tests and hope your girl recovers quickly.

While Poppy does not have DCM or any other cardiology problems I made the food change out of an abundance of caution. I was comfortable changing to Purina because we started feeding our family dogs Purina in 1954 and fed Purina until 2001. All of our dogs had long and healthy lives without any major illness or injuries. I strayed away to grain free foods in 2001 and now am back feeding Purina and grain inclusive foods. I am comfortable with how they manufacture and test their formulas.

Many dogs who have been diagnosed early with DCM have had successful recoveries with change of diet and supportive medications, as long as the damage to the heart is not too severe. DCM which is inherited in some breeds, not standard poodles, do NOT recover with change of diet, however medications can make them more comfortable for the duration of their lives. You might want to join the facebook group Taurine-Deficient (Nutritional) Dialated Cardiomyopathy. It is run by veterinarians, is science and fact based and is very helpful and supportive. It can be overwhelming to read all the information posted in the group, however, if your girl does have this the group will be an invaluable resource.
So, i just took Sophie to PetSmart and to the purina aisle. I let her smell the salmon pro sport and the pro focus. She spent more time smelling focus so i bought that. It said rice but inoticed barley was ahead of rice in the ingredient list. I gave it to her for lunch with a milkbone on top. She gobbled it all up! �� i just got a small bag and hopefully iy will hold her til the cardiologist apt. I was afraid she would turn it down because she turned down some salmon foods years ago. I dont remember what they were but i think they had potatoes in them.
 

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It's not known exactly what is causing nutritionally mediated DCM right now, but it seems to be associated with foods with a high legume content. Unfortunately loading super expensive foods with peas and legumes has become a trend over the last several years...In the past, I do believe it was also associated with lamb and rice diets. If you've been feeding lamb and rice, I'd find something else, preferably a food that does not currently have a high incidence of DCM, if a cardiologist confirms DCM and/or low taurine and advises you to do so. There's also other causes of heart issues, so I would definitely visit with a specialist before making any changes!

https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/news-events/fda-investigation-potential-link-between-certain-diets-and-canine-dilated-cardiomyopathy?fbclid=IwAR3qXElDpUgacgzYXLFtnt-luLmgpwiuNsluq1ulRkLZ9HRwsPwnsAKK7tw#diet
I did make a change. We shall see how it goes. Hoping the apt is not too far off. Office closed til Monday. Thanks.
 

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I did make a change. We shall see how it goes. Hoping the apt is not too far off. Office closed til Monday. Thanks.
I am glad she approves of the Sensitive Skin and Stomach salmon formula.

A lamb and rice formula is not a bad choice for food if it is made by a company which works to formulate the food properly and which does all the proper testing on their formulas to ensure that it is healthy to feed. The problem with some lamb and rice formulas as well as others is that they can be loaded up with peas, lentils, sweet potatoes and other ingredients which are believed to interfere with proper absorbtion of certain amino acids, one of those being taurine.

The important thing now is to feed a food which is not known to be associated with Nutritional DCM and to follow up with your cardiology appointment.

You are doing both. You have the cardiology appointment and you are feeding a grain inclusive Purina formula which had no DCM cases associated with it.

I wish you well and hope your girl recovers quickly.
 

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Transitioning to new foods can sometimes cause gut upsets....this is pretty common, but does not mean your dog is allergic to the new food. Here are a couple of screen shots with helpful info.

Poppy had no issues transitioning to new food, but others may react differently.Hope this info is helpful.
 

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I am glad she approves of the Sensitive Skin and Stomach salmon formula.

A lamb and rice formula is not a bad choice for food if it is made by a company which works to formulate the food properly and which does all the proper testing on their formulas to ensure that it is healthy to feed. The problem with some lamb and rice formulas as well as others is that they can be loaded up with peas, lentils, sweet potatoes and other ingredients which are believed to interfere with proper absorbtion of certain amino acids, one of those being taurine.

The important thing now is to feed a food which is not known to be associated with Nutritional DCM and to follow up with your cardiology appointment.

You are doing both. You have the cardiology appointment and you are feeding a grain inclusive Purina formula which had no DCM cases associated with it.

I wish you well and hope your girl recovers quickly.
Thanks. I thought Natural Balance limited ingredient foods were good. Maybe not or maybe it is not even the issue, but as you say, on to next step and thank you for a good choice that Sophie approves of!
 

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I joined the same group on FB when the info was in the news. Out of the 5 recommended we chose Purina Pro Plan Savor Adult Shredded Blend Beef & Rice Formula Dry Dog Food for Toby and Purina ONE SmartBlend Small Bites Beef and Rice Dry Dog Food for Louie; our tiny Shih-poo.
 

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maybe try a natural dogfood store for some good suggestions. there are a lot of good foods that are not carried by big box stores. Fromm, Victor, are both family owned. I like Farmina, maybe look into that. There are ingredients in SD and Royal Canin that I do not like. Plus look at SD track record, not great. Also check into a limited ingredient food. Raw is great but expensive, but I feel the best food out there for dogs. do your Research
 

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