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I came across this information that I think everyone should read. I had no idea this idea originally was used for children in the car and found to be dangerous.

"Pets are essentially “clothes-lined” by extension tethers – they launch forward and snap back with the spine incurring the most damage. Reports of paralysis, blunt force trauma – and in some cases the spine has been damaged so severely that the internal organs could no longer function and the dog had to be humanely euthanized. Here’s one example that clearly illustrates what happens – Click Here for Case Study" Here is the case study written up in a veterinary journal Veterinarni Medicina http://vri.cz/docs/vetmed/60-7-399.pdf

The quote is from an article Extension Tether Advisory found here https://www.centerforpetsafety.org/pet-parents/extension-tether-advisory/

While a tether will limit the dog's movement in the car so they can't jump into your lap and try to take over the steering wheel, it is important to consider what would happen in an accident or even in a sudden stop.
 

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I use a crate for just this reason - tethers are too dangerous.
 
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Ultimately, it is not practical to safely restrain our dogs to the extent that you can with a human. Crashes are going to be dangerous, and likely to cause serious injuries to your pet.

Whether tethered, or crated, how they survive the crash, will be highly dependent on the position they were in at the time of the crash, and their location inside the vehicle.

In all cases, I believe it is important to minimize the distance they travel before hitting something, as well as taking into consideration what they may be hitting. Traveling less than a foot, and hitting a crate wall, or a seat back, is far better than flying from the rear, and hitting the dash board or windshield. Their momentum being stopped by only a tether and harness may not be ideal, but in some scenarios, I believe it could be better than being unrestrained.

Untitled by Ryan Jakob, on Flickr
 

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Ultimately, it is not practical to safely restrain our dogs to the extent that you can with a human. Crashes are going to be dangerous, and likely to cause serious injuries to your pet.

Whether tethered, or crated, how they survive the crash, will be highly dependent on the position they were in at the time of the crash, and their location inside the vehicle.

In all cases, I believe it is important to minimize the distance they travel before hitting something, as well as taking into consideration what they may be hitting. Traveling less than a foot, and hitting a crate wall, or a seat back, is far better than flying from the rear, and hitting the dash board or windshield. Their momentum being stopped by only a tether and harness may not be ideal, but in some scenarios, I believe it could be better than being unrestrained.

Untitled by Ryan Jakob, on Flickr
Actually my dog is almost as safely restrained as I am in the car - we are both held in by seat belts - not tethers. Here's a link to some photos in the car I took Scroll down to page 4 post 32 https://www.poodleforum.com/5-poodle-talk/256186-car-restraints-4.html In an accident she won't be moving more than a few inches either way as she is linked in closely to the back of the seat.

I do agree, you don't want your dog flying through the car, or going through the car window etc. Lots of horrors we all hope we avoid.
 

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I do use tethers and I do also realize there are risks in doing so, however we are sometimes on the road for hours and crating them is just not possible. I don't have room for two crates and I wouldn't expect them to share a crate. If they were in crates in the way back and I was rear ended it might be dangerous from damage to the crates in the collision. I have a hammock in the back seat and both spoos are tethered so they can't get flung around in the vehicle or worse ejected from it. I agree with rkj that safety in vehicles is very different for our dogs than for us or our children, particularly if the dogs are big. If I had small dogs they would be in crates that were restrained in the middle (back set).
 
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Noelle rides in a rear facing car seat for the reasons mentioned in the article. My car seat is shaped like a catcher's mitt and anchors to the car seat using the same tethers as an infant seat. Just like infants need to ride facing backward to spread forces across their bodies, Noelle's car seat is designed to stop forward movement and keep her in place. It passed crash tests and I'm always grateful when I buckle Noelle in the car.

From the article, it sounded like the tether was too long and the dog hit the back of either the driver's or the passenger's seat, which lead to the injury. Cars really aren't designed for dogs to ride safely, yet. I wonder if a dog safe(er) back seat will become an option on future cars. I'd trade in the back seat of my current car for one designed for dog safety. I never haul people back there, just dogs. Maybe some day we'll get that option. Until then, drive safely.
 

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https://pupsaver.com/collections/all It's called The PupSaver. Video of it passing a crash test. The seat stayed on the bench and the dog was not ejected from the seat. As you can see, it really does act like a catcher's mitt.


There is an earlier version of the Pupsaver that failed a crash test because it shifted laterally. They fixed it and updated it with seatbelt anchors that hold it still laterally. I feel really grateful this seat is in my car because Noelle goes with me everywhere.
 

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The Pupsaver now has seatbelt anchors on the bottom that keeps it from lifting up off the seat during a crash. I really like this car seat. They have three sizes, toy, medium and up to 45 pounds. Noelle is in the medium seat.
 

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I hope you like the PupSaver. It can be tricky to get it set correctly in the car. I think there's an installation video on YouTube.

What I like about the slow motion crash tests is you can see the dog gets flung forward directly into the car seat which absorbs the momentum and cradles the dog. This is the large version of the seat for dogs up to 45 pounds.

I taught Noelle to lie down and stay while I'm driving. Usually she falls asleep curled up inside her seat. You'll need a harness to attach the car seat to the dog. For obvious reasons, the collar is a bad idea. Good luck!
 

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I hope you like the PupSaver. It can be tricky to get it set correctly in the car. I think there's an installation video on YouTube.

What I like about the slow motion crash tests is you can see the dog gets flung forward directly into the car seat which absorbs the momentum and cradles the dog. This is the large version of the seat for dogs up to 45 pounds. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TNLTuXZlAso

I taught Noelle to lie down and stay while I'm driving. Usually she falls asleep curled up inside her seat. You'll need a harness to attach the car seat to the dog. For obvious reasons, the collar is a bad idea. Good luck!


This is a really good video. The forward motion of a crash test makes this type of pet cat seat an excellent choice. Most pet seats are designed for aesthetic and less for safety unfortunately.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Snow,

I hope car manufacturers will seriously consider transporting pets and how to do it safely. Yes, I like the PupSaver because you can see how a dog is flung forward at 35 miles an hour. The dog is caught, restrained and doesn't fall off the seat. Most restraints fail. SleepyPod passes tests. Keep that in mind when you're looking for a restraint for larger dogs. If I had a Spoo, I'd use a Sleepypod Clickit.

In 2013, Subaru sponsored a program where dog car restraints were tested. There's footage of their results on Youtube. It's a very distressing video if you love dogs. Watch if you dare. Remember, these are crash test dogs! Tests are industry standard, 35 miles an hour.

 
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