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Hi all, I'm heading into winter for the first time as a poodle owner n just have a few things to share and ask. My wife recently found the chart you can, hopefully, see attached. I was just wondering if you agree or disagree with this?

And, do you think winter clothes for a toy poodle are essential/important? Korea gets pretty cold, regularly minus double figures celcius real feel. I think we are almost certain to buy a coat n things. I've also already read about shoes, so I think it would be sensible to buy some as well. Although the area I'm in doesn't get a huge amount of snow, we can expect at least a few days where there will be that to contend with as well.

Any experience, knowledge,and thoughts would be greatly received as always. Thanks in advance
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Toy breeds because of their size have difficultly retaining body heat. Roughly when its 45 degree F and under my dogs are in sweat shirts below 32 degrees F they are in jackets, since I have multiple I use Musher Secret on their feet prior to walks on snow or salted roads. It's only been this year my smallest he is 6 1/2 pounds isn't shaking with cold below 60 degrees. I live in a condo so there is no yard access and I must walk my dogs, so there is no quick in and out for a piddle.
 

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I have two toy dogs in a temperate climate. Poppy feels the cold, and will ask for a jumper on walks when the temperature drops towards freezing. Sophy categorically refuses. The only time they really suffered from the cold was when my sisters persuaded me to leave them in the car after a snowy walk, and the car was simply not warm enough - since then I make sure to take hot water bottles in cold weather. I would say the chart is a helpful starting point, with exact reaction to cold depending on acclimatisation.

On clothes I would look at patterns online and see if you can find someone to knit or sew to fit Toffee - Poppy's jumpers are hand knitted in pure wool by a friend, and have the advantage of staying warm and comfortable even when wet. So many dog coats and jumpers are unnecessarily bulky and inflexible in small sizes. I doubt that you would need shoes or boots for shortish walks in occasional snow unless there is widespread use of salt or chemicals to clear it - both of mine loved playing in the snow when they were young, but quickly decided it was to be avoided like rain as they got older!
 

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I live in Canada, with similar winter temperatures to you, although my dogs are all larger breeds so I don't have experience with that part.
I do find that what the normal local temps are makes a huge difference: Friends in warm areas like Florida are putting coats or sweaters on their dogs, at temperatures where my dogs are are finally comfortable and not too hot.
What activity we are involved in makes a difference too, the more active, the less they feel the cold of course.
When I lived in the city one of my dogs needed boots because he was sensitive to the salt. Since moving to the country none of my dogs need (and definitely don't want!) anything on their feet for snow.
 

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If you’re talking putting on a coat for a walk, then I say yes, it’s necessary from about -10C or a little before, depending on the wind.

To go outside to do their business, a toy doesn’t need a coat, even when it’s the coldest. Both my toys go outside when it’s -40C/F; they just hurry up. Having a « pee/poo » command is very useful, as at first they won’t want to go outside when it’s cold. You give the command and praise when they’re done.

I would say even more important than the coat are water repellent boots. As the salt we use in winter to melt ice on sidewalks will burn their feet and you’ll have a three legged poodle who refuses to walk and wants to be picked up in no time.

Also, make sure you grow your dog’s hair longer in winter. I start growing my dogs’ hair for winter early, so they have a nice thick coat when the cold weather hits. My last summer cut is in deptember. You can see on my picture below their coats are getting longer.
 

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I live in Canada, with similar winter temperatures to you, although my dogs are all larger breeds so I don't have experience with that part.
I do find that what the normal local temps are makes a huge difference: Friends in warm areas like Florida are putting coats or sweaters on their dogs, at temperatures where my dogs are are finally comfortable and not too hot.
What activity we are involved in makes a difference too, the more active, the less they feel the cold of course.
When I lived in the city one of my dogs needed boots because he was sensitive to the salt. Since moving to the country none of my dogs need (and definitely don't want!) anything on their feet for snow.
Regarding temperatures in places where it is super humid, like Florida (I have no idea if Korea is very humid)... but pay attention to the heat/cold index. In the winter we could have 60 degree weather but because of humidity (or if we have an uptick of humidity) it can feel like like 45.

Starvt, that may be one of the reasons your Florida friends break out winter wear at higher temps. That and we are just not used to the cold, poodle or human.
 

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I think it's a good start but misses a few key factors. Luckily most dogs are good at communicating when they are cold! Watch for lifted paws, asking to be picked up, or them trying to turn around and go the other direction! Indoors, watch for them curling into a tight ball.

(All temps quoted in Celsius)

My Annie is a spoo, Trixie is a Yorkie. In general, Trixie wears a sweater below zero, maybe 5C, Annie wears one below -10.

Wind, water, sun, and exercise level are the other factors I would think of.

Wind- in my last apartment, i was in an area of blustery, strong winds that picked up over open water. Even at only -8C, both Annie and I got quite cold on our walks, Annie wore a heavy insulated coat, and I ended up putting a cowl over her head some days. I wore hats and scarves and gloves I usually reserve for -30 and below, because of how bad the wind was. On a normal, light wind -10 day - no need.

Water - raining and 2C is significantly more miserable than clear and -10C. The water reduces the insulation value of the fur. I often put a water resistant shell over Annie for long walks in cold rain or blowing snow- otherwise she gets cold. My mom uses Pawz rubber boots on Trixie for any longer walks in winter, her feet are much warmer because they don't get wet, and she can walk much longer before getting cold. With a sweater, coat, and boots, she will cheerfully walk 20 min at -20. Without the boots, she will walk miserably about 3 min.

Sun- sunny and -10 is much more pleasant than overcast, damp, and -5C.

Exercise level - arguably the most important. When freshly shaved down, Annie gets cold overnight in my 15C bedroom, and wears a sweater. When running and playing, she can cheerfully stay out in -20C for an hour or more without a sweater. When walking, she likes a sweater for long walks below -10C, a coat at -20 or so. Trixie gets cold if left to sit on the porch while we work outside at 5C or so, even with a sweater.
 

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I live in one of the coldest and snowiest states in the US. Last winter was my first with little Lacey and I’d say that chart is a good one to follow.
I also use a thin layer of Musher’s Secret on the paw pads (and nose) to protect from the de-icing chemicals in the street and keep them from drying out. Reapply every other day, or about 3x/week. Dog shoes are hard to find a correct fit and we don’t have to be in below freezing temps long enough to bother.
i didn’t use any clothing to keep her warm, but I also didn’t have her outside longer than 5 minutes once it got to feeling like 20 F/ -6C including the windchill. Just long enough to do her business and maybe walk up and down the street.
Be prepared for snow balls to cling to the feet and legs. I melt them with my hand and pull them off because using a dryer several times a day for 4-5 months is a hassle.
Just keep an eye on Toffee. If she’s violently shivering or trying to be picked up when normally she doesn’t, etc then bring her in as long as she’s finished her business. As mentioned before, a quick trip outside to potty doesn’t require any clothing. Lacey didn’t waste any time sniffing around when it’s cold. She wants to get out and in quick.
 

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Commuting with Gracie in winter, I would use Pawz booties to protect her feet from the crazy salty Toronto streets and sidewalks. They prevented snowballs, too.

They do nothing for the cold, but are still nice to have on hand. The salt really hurts! They look like little deflated balloons, so you can keep them in your pocket, glove box, wherever.
 

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I've only one thing to add beyond agreement with the comments above. We're in Kansas and it can get very cold and very snowy. Snow packs into the feet and lower legs if there's any accumulation at all.

As an option to using a dryer to melt and dry, I use a plastic cup half filled with warm water to pretty instantly dissolve the snow pack from feet and lower legs. I can towel dry from there or blow dry if I need to. I use that for muddy paws too :). I got the idea from a gadget I saw on Amazon.
 
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