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I currently have the sweetest yorkipoo ever. We are probably going to get another dog next year and have to decide if we want another yorkipoo or a straight poodle. I think yorkies are more high strung, so poodle would be a better fit. I know yorkipoos aren't standardized and even though we clearly got the best of both in her, we might get the worst next time! Her weight has been in the 8-10.5 range for her adult life. 10 pounds seems perfect to me. I am concerned with getting a toy (7 pds or smaller) or a min of over 12 pounds, so I don't know what to do.

Maggie was 2.5 pounds at 13 weeks, and I think she was underweight due to her laid back dispostion, I think she was last to eat because she was intimidated by the other pups in with her. I'm wondering if the way to pick the right adult size is to pick the right size puppy. Does that make sense? If a 12 week puppy is 2 pounds, it would be a small adult and if it's 4 pounds maybe it will be bigger? Is there a "growth chart" kind of like people. My son was always in the 10-25th percentile as a child for height and is in the 5'9 range, while my other son was in the 50-75 range and is closer to 6ft, so the charts were a good predictor.

Seems like a mix between toy and mini would be just right if I want a 10 pounder. Will a breeder ever breed like that or is it a huge no-no? I'm not interested in registration or breeding my puppy.

Do toys have more health issues? I know the smaller yorkies are more prone to problems. The problems are partly due to breeding them to be small.
 

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I do not know of any reputable breeder who would cross-breed varieties. I'm afraid you cannot always predict adult size from puppy size. A better predictor would be the size of the puppy's parents. It is not at all uncommon for toys to grow larger than desired. People who breed toy poodles for show usually try to get their dogs to grow to between 9 1/2 and 10 inches. Since they are trying for the top of the standard, many do go over.

I would go to a toy poodle breeder and ask for a puppy who is likely to go oversize if you want a larger toy. They will probably be happy to help you out!
 

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In general a reputable breeder won't do an inter-variety cross. The exceptions are pretty rare and usually have to do with a breeder trying to correct a problem or introduce a specific trait to their line. Sketchy breeders might do it simply because they had access to the two dogs and, hey, why not, someone will buy the puppies.

A good toy breeder will health test the parents and will avoid striving for teacup size for the health reasons you mention. Although you just want a pet, I would encourage you to look into show breeders. Choosing parents - size, temperament, health - is the same skill set whether breeding for pet or breeding for show. However, show breeders tend to be pretty thorough in researching their crosses, so you are less likely to get blindsided by something unexpected.
 

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I might add to Cowpony's suggestion that show breeders are not likely to have exorbitant prices. When you breed for show there are always puppies in a litter that will go to pet homes. These will have been carefully bred and carefully raised just like the ones kept for show!
 

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I do not know of any reputable breeder who would cross-breed varieties. I'm afraid you cannot always predict adult size from puppy size. A better predictor would be the size of the puppy's parents. It is not at all uncommon for toys to grow larger than desired. People who breed toy poodles for show usually try to get their dogs to grow to between 9 1/2 and 10 inches. Since they are trying for the top of the standard, many do go over.

I would go to a toy poodle breeder and ask for a puppy who is likely to go oversize if you want a larger toy. They will probably be happy to help you out!
I mistakenly assumed they tried to breed the toys small. It's good to know they try for the high end of size for show.
 

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I might add to Cowpony's suggestion that show breeders are not likely to have exorbitant prices. When you breed for show there are always puppies in a litter that will go to pet homes. These will have been carefully bred and carefully raised just like the ones kept for show!
This is not something I had thought of. Very good point!
 

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My toy poodle is probably the exact size you want — she is "oversized" height-wise and is currently 8lbs, will likely be 10-12 in full adulthood.

When I met the breeder, I was able to see the parents and she is a super comparable size to them! Highly recommend meeting the parents or getting their measurements if you can, it will give a good idea of how big the puppies will get.

My breeder also mentioned that her and many others that show toys tend to breed on the bigger end of the range. Not sure if this is regional or a general standard, but I find that most breeders love talking about what they do so definitely ask around.
 

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When I was looking for a puppy I was hoping for 10 lbs, less than that seemed too small and more than that seemed too big. (I smile now when I think of this conundrum I was in). I had the opportunity to visit a breeder who had both varieties and I really liked one of her poodles who eventually became Violet’s mother. She is a mini poodle. The breeder guessed she would be around 13 lbs. At 15 months old she seems to have topped out at 11 lbs. She is sturdy and athletic, while still being graceful. I am content with her size. Must admit though, when she sits on my lap she blocks my view.

I think most people who like 10 lb dogs will do best to seek out an oversized toy, unless you want a sturdier dog. The minis have bigger bones than the toys do.
 

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I got my boy Leonard at 18 weeks he was too tall to show he is ~11" and 6 1/2 pounds and has many generations of show dogs on all sides and is by far the smallest toy poodle I have owned.
That said my girls are larger 8 /2 + pounds, more than likely inter variety bred longer than they are tall and heavier than my boy I love them dearly but their conformation is terrible, long backed and one has neck issues which is not uncommon with longer backs.
 

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Zoe is 11 pounds. She is about 14 inches at the shoulder, very fine-boned. That is smaller than most of the miniatures being shown right now - which is why we stopped showing her in conformation. We will continue in agility, obedience, and barn hunt, and maybe scent work. Isn't it nice that there are so many different things you can do with your dog! I'd love to try doc-diving, but water is in short supply here in New Mexico!
 
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