Poodle Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Do any of y'all have insights linking particular diets or ingredients with poodles producing more or less porphyrins?

The reason I ask is our standard white male has begun to develop some red tint to some of his hair at 18 months old. I'm familiar with saliva being the cause of red fur staining from porphyrins. However, it's not like the minimal amounts of dark rust red you get around his eyes or mouth or in between his toes. It's almost a peach color and very faint in most places. But he has no allergies and doesn't lick unless there's an actual injury. Plus the locations are interesting (and some are impossible to lick). On the back of his front elbows and front arm pits fading into his chest. Some more around the back of the ears near where they meet the skull. Some on his rear ankles.

The bits on the elbows and ankles are darker and at those are his favorite contact points when sitting or lying down. That's certainly part of it. His hair is lush and thick there and the skin is soft without any callus or dryness though.

So I'm eliminating things to see if this trend can be reversed.

We've always used Wahl 4-in-1 Calming Pet Shampoo. And I do the grooming on him. I'm not thinking this is it. But I'm going to get the whitening version from Wahl.

He eats out of stainless bowl and drinks filtered water out of a stainless bowl.

Another thing that comes to mind is his food. He's not into treats btw. We went through a bunch of food choices before finding one that presented good solid stools that he was happy to eat when he hit adulthood. Right now it's Diamond Pro89 and he's been on it for about 4 months. Before he was on Large Breed Puppy Lamb and Rice Formula. I'm out in the country and the local feed store has some limited other options. Do y'all think changing to something grain free like Diamond Skin and Coat All Life Stages Salmon & Potato Formula would do any good. What little I've found online about porphyrins that tries to make a link to diet has to do with hydrolyzed proteins and grains.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,572 Posts
Since porphyrins are essential in proper formation of hemoglobin and myoglobin I would not particularly try to decrease their production. Unless this is a dog being shown in conformation I don't think I would give it much thought. And since you mentioned changing foods to find one that has good digestive outcomes I wouldn't mess with changing foods either.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I've been reading more about it today and I don't think I'm going down the right path with a food change either. I think we'll perhaps try a whitening shampoo for a while. And pick up another bed for the guy to have in the living room since he lays there a lot in the evenings on the hard floor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
How often do you bath him, does the color come out after a bath? On the spots is it the whole strand of hair or just the tips turning color? Could It be something he is laying on that is staining him?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Good question. He gets a pretty thorough scrub and shower and shampoo every weekend. It's mostly the whole hair strand actually. When you look at one strand it's hard to tell it's not white. It blends in with his pink skin. It's when you get a whole tuft that the color shows. He spends most of his time when he's lying down either on a leather couch, the concrete floor, or his bed.

I just had a thought. He does love jumping into the pool and lying down on the tanning ledge since it gets hot in Texas. That'll change soon, but he does that probably at least once a day. It's a computer monitored chlorine sanitized pool. Maybe that?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,292 Posts
Could it be areas that are staying wet longer after his swims? Maybe yeast?

I can't speak to the quality of their source(s), but this article does offer up some interesting alternative explanations:

"It has been proven that particular wavelengths of sunlight bring about a yellow tinge on wool. Since wool has the same biochemical structure, it is entirely plausible that this scenario could apply to the yellow colouration of a white dog coat."

And:

"The discolouration can also be the result of a mechanical stress on the coat. The dog rubs its coat on different surfaces, the hair becomes brittle and the light is now refracted differently so that the coat now appears to have a reddish tinge."

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
It could be from the pool, as I know that black spoo hair can tint red/brown if it is allowed to dry from sunlight due to oxidation.

Also side note I was reading from the same article @PeggyTheParti 😂
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
It could be from the pool, as I know that black spoo hair can tint red/brown if it is allowed to dry from sunlight due to oxidation.

Also side note I was reading from the same article @PeggyTheParti 😂
This is pretty good speculation. I was just getting a haircut and mentioned this mystery to my stylist. She suggested a really good whitening purple shampoo. And that just mist the hair and smear the shampoo in well. Don't let it foam up. And leave it for 10-15 minutes. Then get it wet and foamy and rinse it out. That'll help grab the orange tint out of the hair she claimed. I'll find out tomorrow when the shampoo comes in. And I guess I'll do a much better job drying my poodle than just a quick towel off.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
I use a blue whitening dog shampoo for my white poodle, apparently I just recently learned the little bit of blue tricks the eye to think that your whites are whiter.
20200923_194443.jpg
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top