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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Has anyone used this book for upland training? It covers duck pheasant all sorts. Our focus will be phesants I find it to be a valuable tool lots of good information so far. If you have any suggested reading material that might help us I appreciate it. I'm so excited to be embarking on this adventure with my dog. For those that don't know I've included a little bit of traditional poodle history. They make one heck of a companion in the field their versatility is shocking I've never experienced that with other breeds. The book is also a valuable resource for early puppy basic training. I know not everybody will be into hunting upland game ect. The information in here still has tons of value for basic dog traning. Potty training crate training place command sit stay fetch leash traning on and off much more.
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Ear pinches and jowl pinches? I would not take this approach, and especially not with a smart, sensitive poodle. I am not familiar with retriever training, but I am sure there are more effective, scientifically-sound methods out there.

Hope more knowledgeable folks will chime in.

In the meantime, here’s a still-relevant article from 2001, which offers an alternative that won’t risk your bond with your dog:

 

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I also would not use this book because of jowl pinches. I would look for a method that uses positive reinforcement. Long ago i regularily went pheasant hunting with my dad and our amazing labrador, Wild Fowler's Cover Girl.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ear pinches and jowl pinches? I would not take this approach, and especially not with a smart, sensitive poodle. I am not familiar with retriever training, but I am sure there are more effective, scientifically-sound methods out there.

Hope more knowledgeable folks will chime in.

In the meantime, here’s a still-relevant article from 2001, which offers an alternative that won’t risk your bond with your dog:

Absolutely I didn't really care for that method either. There are a few things in the book where my methods differ. Especially when it comes to bite control. I've already got a leg up he's past basic training for a puppy. He already knows sit stay fetch hunt em up and place. He loves hide and seek🙂
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
One thing I've already got for him is a protective device. It works like a skid plate for going through brush to protect his underside. I also got a reflective vest to make him highly visible. I agree a prong collar should not be used to train something new. I've heard it called by many names prong collar shock collar but what it really is a proper unit type is a TENS unit. Much like what they use in physical therapy on humans. There are definitely a lot of bad units out there that wouldn't fit into that category. Improper use of one can really do a lot of damage to a dog. It's never used to train a new behavior only to reinforce what's already known. More like an annoying tick that gets the dog's attention when used properly. A clicker beeper vibrating collar or whistle works too. You just have to read the dog to see what they respond to in high drive . Let that dictate the method used to get their attention.
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I knew someone who used a variation of jowl pinches on mouthy dogs. When a dog playfully bit her hand she would simply wrap her hand around the jaw and not let go for five seconds. She wouldn't squeeze hard or hang on long enough to cause the dog to panic; she simply made the point that mouthing hands wasn't fun. I personally don't want to risk teaching my dog to be hand shy. I use a hand lure for too many things; it would make my life so much more complicated if my dog was reluctant to put his face up against my hand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Absolutely you have to read the dog. It may sound crazy but my method involved keeping my hand in his mouth as a pup. When he would bite too hard I would give a ouch and stop giving attention. I would put a chew in his mouth that was very effective. I too don't want him to be fearful of mouthing things. He might put me to work going out into the field to retrieve carry back pheasants😅. Now he doesn't really mouth my hands at all just his toys or things he fetches.
 

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I recommend following Standing Stone Kennel on YouTube. They have a whole series of dog training videos on bird hunting. Here's an example.
Thanks for that video, Magna_Tom! This is really helpful and well timed in my quest to teach Topper to swim. We. took him wading a few times last summer and he didn't seemto like it. Since then I have taken him hiking along streams and rivers where we can wade or go "rock hopping," and he seems to like it and has started to go in on his own. Last week we came to a spot with a pool between two sections of faster water. The upper section produced bubbles that fascinated Topper. He waded out to catch them and came very close to swimming to get to more of them. We're headed up there next week and will try to give him the same opportunity again. I'm focusing on letting him explore at his comfort level. I was having so much fun watching him play in the water that I forgot to take pictures!
 
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