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Hello Everyone
Well the wait is soon to be over. Our Standard puppy was born on June 21st!!, and will be coming home around the 9th to 10 week mark. Though we had hoped for a boy, the mother had all girls, therefore "Beau" has become a "Cleo".
I was wondering, at what age are dew claws normally removed by, and is this procedure always done?
Thank you
 

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Dew Claws (usually with tails) are removed within 3 days of being born. Most breeders will remove dew claws and tails, but it depends on the breeder. :p
 

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Congratulations!! June 21st is a lovely day to be born on...IMO :D

but like Jak said the dewclaws and tail should be done a few days after birth so not to cause to much discomfort :]
 

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It's not ALWAYS done, but I think it's a good thing to have done. I've heard a couple stories of adult dogs getting their dewclaws caught on things or ripped out during activities, and it's very painful for the dog. With an active dog like a spoo, I would want dewclaws removed...however, if your breeder hasn't done it yet, I think it's too late.
 

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It's not ALWAYS done, but I think it's a good thing to have done. I've heard a couple stories of adult dogs getting their dewclaws caught on things or ripped out during activities, and it's very painful for the dog. With an active dog like a spoo, I would want dewclaws removed...however, if your breeder hasn't done it yet, I think it's too late.
Well..the dew claws can still be removed but it is MUCH easier and more painless when done shortly after birth. My sister's 4 yr old Bernese Mountain Dog recently tore open one of his dew claws and then had surgery to remove them. So it can be done...but it is a more major surgery when done later.
 

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Well..the dew claws can still be removed but it is MUCH easier and more painless when done shortly after birth. My sister's 4 yr old Bernese Mountain Dog recently tore open one of his dew claws and then had surgery to remove them. So it can be done...but it is a more major surgery when done later.
Sorry, yes, you are right. I just meant its too late to remove them without surgery. As little pups, you just cut them off with scissors :S
 

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Congrats on your pups birth! We'll both be starting the poodle pup adventure soon. I was also wanting a boy but it'll be a girl and in the end I don't think that will matter much. Still have to choose exactly which one I want and she'll be arriving middle on July.
Who's the breeder you chose?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you to those who responded to my dew claw question, your answers helped me quite a bit.
It is nice to be able to come here and get such great help and advice.
 

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Congrats on your pups birth! We'll both be starting the poodle pup adventure soon. I was also wanting a boy but it'll be a girl and in the end I don't think that will matter much. Still have to choose exactly which one I want and she'll be arriving middle on July.
Thank you, and congratulations to you as well. We will be picking out our girl when she is about 6 weeks, then she will come home with us a few weeks after that. Yes it will be an adventure that I am so looking forward to. She will be my first standard poodle, will yours or have you had one before?
 

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As a dog groomer, I've seen a lot of dew claws. IME the only ones that are really at risk for tearing off are those that "float." Meaning, they're not attached to the bone the way the other toes are, they simply hang off the dog's leg.

If your pup has good, solid dewclaws, I would leave them as they can help the dog with certain things such as face scratching and gripping. However, if they're loose or floppy, just ask your vet to remove them at the same time as the spay. This will not only be cheaper, but you won't have to put her under multiple times (each anesthesia poses a risk to the dog). Floppy dewclaws are very easily removed and usually heal quickly.

Congrats on your new pup!
 

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Thank you, and congratulations to you as well. We will be picking out our girl when she is about 6 weeks, then she will come home with us a few weeks after that. Yes it will be an adventure that I am so looking forward to. She will be my first standard poodle, will yours or have you had one before?
No. She'll be my first and from what I understand it'll be a bit of a learning curve when it comes to the training. Throughout my life I've had experience with Shepherds, a Rottie, my little Rat Terrier 'Butter' as well as a bunch of mixed breeds working at the SPCA when I was younger, but never a poodle. Not even a cross. I think I'm gonna need some advice when it comes to training, so I can learn how not to be outsmarted by my dog!
 

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If your pup has good, solid dewclaws, I would leave them as they can help the dog with certain things such as face scratching and gripping. However, if they're loose or floppy, just ask your vet to remove them at the same time as the spay. This will not only be cheaper, but you won't have to put her under multiple times (each anesthesia poses a risk to the dog). Floppy dewclaws are very easily removed and usually heal quickly.

Congrats on your new pup!
Thank you Savannah, TBH I had not even thought of that and it is a very good idea to have them removed when she is fixed. It is difficult deciding one way or the other, each side of the pros and cons have valid points.
Thanks again for your point, I appreciate the help.
Macker905
 

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No. She'll be my first and from what I understand it'll be a bit of a learning curve when it comes to the training. Throughout my life I've had experience with Shepherds, a Rottie, my little Rat Terrier 'Butter' as well as a bunch of mixed breeds working at the SPCA when I was younger, but never a poodle. Not even a cross. I think I'm gonna need some advice when it comes to training, so I can learn how not to be outsmarted by my dog!
It sounds like we will be learning about the standard puppy training at around the same time, as this will be my first poodle as well. Like you I am quite familiar with the shepherds, we lost our 2 within the last 2 years and that has been quite difficult. Both of them took to their training very well, I recieved compliments on them whenever we were out. Like the poodles they were very intelligient and so eager to learn. I am really looking forward to training our poodle, and working with her. I have posted some pictures of my female shepherd, having trouble accessing the pictures of my male though.
Looking forward to learning 'with you'
 
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